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IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY OF JAPAN. 



(TEIKOKU DAIGAKU). 



THE 



CALENDAR. 



2556-57 



(1896-97) 



I ••• i 



TOKYO : v^ 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY. 



Fo; sale by Z. P. Maruya, & Co. 

2557. 

(1897) 



r 



, 



1 



^ 



\ 




L 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

I. Calendar 2 

II. Historical Summary 4 

III. Imperial Ordinance for the Founding of the Imperial 

University 17 

IV. Imperial Ordinances relating, one to the Officers of the 

Imperial University, and the other to the Appointment 

of a Foreigner to a Professorship 21 

V. Imperial Ordinance relating to the Chairs of Professor- 
ship ;... 24 

VI. Imperial Ordinance relating to the Regulations for 

Degrees ' 28 

VII. By-Laws relating to the Regulations for Degrees 29 

VIII. Regulations as to Examination for Degrees of the 

Students of the University Hall 33 

IX. University Officers 34 

X. General Regulations for the Colleges 38 

1. Academic year, Terms and Vacations 38 

2. Conditions of Admission and Attendance 38 

3. Suspension of Attendance 41 

4. Examinations and Certificates :. i. 42 

5. Post-Graduate Studies 47 

6. Unpaid Assistants 49 

7. Elective Studies 49 

8. Honour Students h.. 51 

9. - Loan Scholarships 52 

10. Suspension, Forfeiture, and Repayment of Government 

• Cadetships, and Loan Scholarships ;... 56 

11. Donations in Money ; « . . • '57 



( 



fF 



II CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 

1 2. Scientific Excursions 59 

13. Fees and other Expenses 61 

14. Regulation for Voluntary Military Service 62 

XI. College of Law 63 

1. Officers 63 

2. Courses of Instruction and Subjects 64 

3. Regulations for Examinations .- 66 

4. By-Laws relating to the Regulations for Examinations. . 69 
Xn. College of Medicine 73 

1. Officers 73 

2. Courses of Instruction 74 

3. Regulations for Graduation Examinations 78 

4. By-Laws to the Regulations for Elective and Post- 

Graduate Students 95 

5* Course of State Medicine 96 

6. Hospitals 97 

XIII. College of Engineering •■ loi 

1. Officers loi 

2. Courses of Instruction 103 

3. Regulations for Examinations* 115 

4. By-Laws relating to the Regulations for Examinations. 116 

5. Regulations relating to Practical Training and Directions 

for Students undertaking Practical Work or Excursions. 1 19 

6. Laboratories ••••. 122 

7. Museums 124 

XIV. College of Literature 126 

1. Officers 125 

2. Courses of Instruction .... , 128 

XV. College of Science 142 

1. Officers 142 

2. Courses of Instruction 143 

3. Museums 151 

4. Tokyo Astronomical Observatory 155 

5. Botanic Garden 156 

6. Seismological Observatory , 159 

7. Marine Biological Station 161 

XVI. College of Agriculture 163 



9 

24 
26 
126 

I4« 
143 



CONTENTS. JII 

PAGE. 

X. Officers 163 

2. Courses of Instruction 165 

3. Regulations for Graduation in the Course of Veterinary 

Medicine 171 

4. Regulations for Subsidiary Courses in Agriculture, 

Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine 172 

5. Farm, Nursery, Botanic Garden, Cattle &c 179 

6. Laboratories, Museums, & 182 

7. Veterinary Hospital z86 

8. Pomological Garden in Daishigawara 187 

g. The Kiyosumi Forest in Awa Province 188 

10. Regulations for Volunteer Farm Labourers 189 

XVII. University Hall 192 

Regulations • 192 

Admission 193 

XVIII. Library 195 

XIX. Dormitories, Recreation and Physical Exercises 203 

XX. List of Students 208 

XXI. List of Gakushi and Graduates 259 

HOgakushi of Tokyo Daigaku 259 

HOgakushi (Law) of Teikoku Daigaku 260 

HOritsugakushi of Tokyo HOgakkO 269 

Graduates „ ,, „ 270 

Hogakushi (Politics) of Teikoku Daigaku 270 

Igakushi of Tokyo Daigaku 274 

Seiyakushi „ „ „ 277 

Jun-Igakushi „ „ „ 278 

Igakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 278 

Yakugakushi „ „ „ 284 

K5gakushi of K5bu DaigakkO 285 

Graduates ,, „ ,, 290 

Kdgakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 291 



.155 



^^ Bungakushi of Tokyo Daigaku 300 

Bungakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 30c 

Rigakushi of Tokyo Daigaku 303 



• ^5^ Rigakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 310 

"^ NOgakushi of Komaba NOgakkO 313 

..•«3 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

NOgeikagakushi of Komaba NOgakkO 314 

NOgakushi of Tokyo NOringakkO 315 

Graduates of the Course of Agriculture in Teikoku Dai- 

gaku ••...• 316 

NOgakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 317 

Ringakushi of Tokyo NoringakkO 319 

Graduates of the Course of Forestry in Teikoku Daigaku. 320 

JRingakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 320 

Juigakushi. of Komaba NOgakkO 4 . . • 321 

Juigakushi of Tokyo NoringakkO «... 322 

Graduates of the Course of Veterinary Medicine in Tei- 

. koku Daigaku 323 

Juigakushi of Teikoku Daigaku 323 

List of Journals, Memoirs and Bulletins of the Imperial 

University 

Rough Plan of the University Compound * . . 

„ „ „ „ Agricultural College Compound .... 



CALENDAR. 






r 



IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY OF JAPAN. 



1896. 

September. 



October. 



November. 



December. 



1897. 



January. 



I 



S. M. T. W. Th. F. S. 

12345 
6 7 8 9 10 II 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 



I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

(I 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 aS 29 30 31 



1 23 456 7H is Majesty *8 Birthday, 



Summer Vacation ends, 

loth. 
First Term begins, nth 
Holiday of the Shiukl 

Korei Sai^ 22nd. 



Holiday of the Kanname 
Matsurit 17th. 



8 9 10 ic ^2 ij 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 2t 

22 23 2| 25 26 27 28 

29 30 







I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




^ 


10 


II 


12 


»3 


H 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


2^ 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


3« 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


IX 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


3t 















3rd- 
Holiday of the Niiname 

Matsurit 23 rd. 



First Term ends, 24th. 
Winter Vacation begins, 
25th. 



Winter Vacation ends, 

7th. 
Second Term begins, 8th. 
Holiday of the Komei 

Tenno Sat, 30th. 



CALENDAR FOR 1894-95. 



IC 



10S| 






1897. 


s. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


Th. 


F. 


S. 




February. 




I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Holiday of the Klgen. 




7 


8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


»3 


Setsu, nth. 




^4 


»5 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 






21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


: 




28 














'. 


March. 




I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Anniversary of the Uni- 




7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


X3 


versity, I St. 




H 


«5 


16 


'7 


18 


?9 


20 


Holiday of the Shunkl- 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


Korei Sai, 20th. 




28 


29 


30 


31 








Second Term ends, 31st. 


April. 










I 


2 


3 


Spring Vacation begins, 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


ISt. 


^ 


II 


12 


13 


H 


15 


16 


»7 


Spring Vacation ends, 




iS 


J9 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


7th. 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


90 




Third Term begins, 8th. 


May. 














I 






2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 






9 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


15 


• 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


• 




23 


24 


as 


26 


27 


28 


29 






30 


31 














June. 






I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Term Work ceases, 17th. 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


Annual Examinations 


V 


13 


14 


>5 


16 


17 


18 


"9 


begin, 2ist. 


- 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




27 


28 


29 


30 








i 


J«iy- 










I 


2 


3 


Third Term ends, loth. 


• 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Sum r.er Vacation begins. 




II 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


nth. 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




t . 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


51 


•   *. 



1 



II. HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 

Inasmuch as the Teikoku Daigaku or Imperial 
Unievrsity owes its existence to the union of the late Tokyo 
Daigaku, K6bu Daigakko, and TokyO N6ringakk6, it seems 
fitting that, in tracing its histor}', reference should be made 
to the origin of these three institutions. 

The four departments of Law, Science, Medicine, and 
Literature, which composed the T6ky6 Daigaku, sprang, 
with the one exception of the Department of Medicine, 
from an institution of some antiquity founded by the Toku- 
gawa Government, and known first as the YOgakujo, and 
afterwards as the Kaiseijo. This institution was, after the 
Restoration of 1868, revived by the Imfperial Government, 
and in the following year, the College received the name 
of Daigaku Nanko and was attached to the Daigaku, which 
was then established at Yushima. 

In the year 187 1, the Daigaku Nanko came directly 
under the control of the Department of Education then 
first established, and was called simply the Nank6, and in 
the following year, when the country was mapped out 
into educational districts, it received the name of the First 
Middle School of the First Grand Educational District. 

In 1873, the name of the institution was changed to 
Raise I GakkO, and in the same year, the institution was 
transferred to the new buildings just completed at Nishiki- 
CHO SanchOme, Kanda. 

In 1874, the word '*T5ky6" was prefixed to the name 
of the institution, and it was called the Tokyd Kaisei GakkO* 

In April of 1876, this institution was united to the 
Tokyo IgakkO or Medical College so as to form the TOkyO 



HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 5 

Daigaku or T0KY6 University, comprising the four De- 
partments of Law, Science, Medicine and Literature. The 
Departments of Law, Science and Literature were com- 
bined in one institution and one President was appointed 
for these three. 

The Medical Department sprang out of the Igakujo, an 
institution in Izumibashi, Shitaya, originally belonging to 
the Tokugawa Government, and revived by the Imperial 
Government in 1868. In the following year, this School 
and the Hospital, previously established in the old TodO 
Yashiki, Shitaya, were united under the name of the Medic- 
al School and Hospital. Soon afterwards the combined 
institution was attached to the Daigaku and received the 
name of Daigaku TOko. In 187 1, this institution came 
under the control of the Departmant of Education and 
shortened its name to Toko, and in 1872, assumed the 
name of Igakko or Medical College in the First Grand 
Educational District, which title was again changed to 
T5Ky6 Igakko in the year 1874. 

lu 1876, the new buildings at MotofujichO, Hongo, 
having been completed, the College was transferred thither 
from Shitaya. In April, the following year, the College 
having been united to the T6ky6 Kaiseigakk6 became the 
Medical Department of the Tokyo Daigaku or TQkyO Univer- 
sity, and one President was appointed for that Depart- 
ment. 

In June, 1881, the organization of the T0kv6 Daigaku 
was modified, whereby one President should be appointed 
to have control not only of the four Departments of Law, 
Science, Medicine and Literature, but also of the Prepara- 
tory School. On the 9th of August of 1884, the Central 
Office of the University and the Departments of Law and 



Q HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 

Literature were transferred to the buildings in the com* 
pound at No. i. Motofujicho, Kongo. In October, the 
office of Vice President was created. On the 14th of 
August, 1885, the Preparatory School dissolved its con- 
nection with the University and became an independent 
institution. On the 7th of September of the same year^ 
the Department of Science also removed to HongO. 

On the 28th of the same month, the Tokyo H6gakk6 
or Law School was merged into the Law Department of 
the University. This institution, which began in 1872 with 
the giving of legal instruction to a certain number of 
students at one of the bureaus, Meihorio, of the Depart- 
ment of Justice, and which, then under the control of the 
Department of Justice, was called Hogakko Seisoku Kwa, 
came under the control of the Educational Department in 
December 1884, and took the name of Tokyo HOgakko. 

Also in December of the same year, the Department 
of Technology was created, and coursss in Mechanical and 
Civil Engineering, Mining, Applied Chemistry, Naval Ar- 
chitecture, and kindred subjects were transferred to the 
new Department from the Science Department. The course 
of Politics in the Literature Department was likewise trans- 
ferred to the Law Department, henceforward to be known 
as the Department of Law and Politics. 

The KoBU Daigakko, originally known as the Kogakko, 

was instituted at Toranomon-uchi, in 187 1, in connection 
with the Bureau of Engineering in the Public Works Depart- 
ment of the Imperial Goverment. The institution was in 
1.872 divided into the College and the Preparatory School.. 
In 1874, the Preparatory School was actually opened for 
instruction in Yamato-Yashiki, Tameike, and in 1876 an 
Art School was created in connection with the College. 



HISTOI^ICAL SUMMARY. 7 

In 1877, the Bureau of Engineering was abolished, and 
the College was thenceforce called the Kobu Daigakk^ or 
Imperial College of Engineenng. The same year witnessefl 
the completion of the large fiew buildings at Toranomon. 

lu June, 1882, the term 'Of engagement of the Head- 
professor Mr. Henry Dyer expired. Since his first appoint^ 
ment in 1873, during a Head-pofessorship of ten pears he 
had rendered valuable service to the College. For this 
reason, when he was leaving Japan, he was decorated with 
the Third Order of the Rising Sun, and was also appointed 
honorary Head-professor of the Engineering College. 

In 1882, the Art School was discontinued. In 1885 Xtm 
Department of Public Works was abolished, an event whkh 
caused the College to be transferred to the control of the 
Department of Education. 

On the ist. of March, 1886, the Imperial Ordinance 
No, 3 was promulgated for the organisation of the Tei«OKU 
Daigaku or Imperial University, and the T6ky6 Daigaku 
and KObu Daigakk6 were merged in the new institution. 
HiROMOTO Watanabe, then the Governor of T^kv5 Fu, wa» 
appointed President of the University. 

In April, curricula of instruction for the several Co 
leges of the University were established. Each course 
extends over three years, excepting the course in Medicine, 
which extends over four years. In the same month, the* 
Tokyo Shokko GakkO (School of Industrial Technology) was 
placed under the control of the University. 

Oft the 29th of October, His Imperial Majesty the 
Emperor visited the University to inspect all the lecture* 
rooms and laboratories of each College, the dormitories, 
the Hospital, the Library, &c.| as well as the Botanic 
Garden of the University. 



8 H1ST<>RICAL SUMMARY. 

In November, the- five principal private Law Schools 
in the city, Senshiu Gakko, MbijihOritsu GaxkO, TOKVd 
Semmon GakkOi Tokyo HogakkO, and Igirisu HOritsu 
Gakko were placed under the supervision of the University. 

. In December of the same year, a Marine Zoological 
Station was established at Misaki, a town situated at Cape 
Miura» iu Sagami. 

In May, 1887, the Imperial Ordinance No. 13 was pro- 
mulgated, establishing regulations for Learned Degrees, 
which are of two classes viz., that of Daihakushi, and Haku- 
shi. The degrees oiHakushi are of five kinds, viz., Hogaku- 
hakushif Igakuhakushi, KOgakuhakushi, Bungakuhakushi 
and Rigakuhakushi, which shall be granted to those, who 
shall have passed the prescribed examinations at the Uni- 
versity Hall ; the degree of Daihakushi shall be granted to 
those who are recognized as men of great merit in any branch 
of learning. In June of the same year, by-laws connected 
with these regulations were issued by the Minister of State 
for Education. These two documents will be found, in 
full, further on in the Calendar. 

In July, it was decided that graduates of the Colleges 
should be entitled to call themselves Hogakiishi^ Igaknshi 
{Yakngakushi in the case of graduates in the course of 
Pharmacy), Kdgakushi, Bungakushi and Rigakiishi respec- 
tively, according to the course which they had pursued, and 
that yuH'Igakushi of the T6ky6 Daigaku, and graduates of 
the KoBU DaigakkO who had not received degrees, should 
be allowed to call themselves Igaknshi and Kogaknshi re- 
spectively after obtaining the sanction of the President of 
the University, provided . that, after graduation, they 
continue following their, professions, in the same special 
line which they had pursued at the University. 



HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 9 

On the 4th of October, the T6ky6 Shokk6 Gakk6 was 
separated from the University, by the issue of the Imperial 
Ordinance No. 51. 

In March 1888, the Imperial Ordinance No. 19 was 
t issued, regulating the income, from tuition fees and various 

other sources, of all educational institutions under th6 
direct control of the Department of Education. 

In May, the University/ was released from the duty of 
supervising the five principal private law schools in T6ky6. 

On the 29th of the same month. Her Majesty the 
Empress visited the University to interview all patients 
belonging to the sections of medicine, surgery, obstetrics, 
and ophthalmology in the Hospital and also inspect its 
operating room, as well as .the lecture-rooms and labor- 
^ atories of both the Medical and Science Colleges. 

On the 1st of June of the same year, the T0ky6 Obser- 
vatory, formed by the amalgamation with the University 
Observatory of the Astronomical Section of the Home 
Department and the Astronomical Observatory of the 
Imperial Navy, was placed under the control of the Im- 
perial University, which was accordingly entrusted with 
the duty of publishing the Astronomical Alhianac. 

On the 31st of July, the College of Engineering was 
S moved to the new brick building, just completed for its use, 

in the compounds at HongO. 

On the 30th of October of the same year, a ** Temp- 
orary Committee for the Compilation of the National 
History " was established. This was due to the disconti- 
nuance of the ** Temporary Board for the Compilation of the 
National History in the Naikaku," and to the subsequent 
entrusting of the work to the Imperial University. 

On the 20th of December of the same year, the 



# 



r: 



lO HISTORICAL SUM&!ARY. 

College of Science wss removed to the new building then 
completed. 

On the igth of May, 1890, Hiromoto Watanabe, the 
president of the Imperial University, was appointed a 
Minister Plenipotentiary, and Hiroyuki KatO, a member of 
the Senate, succeeded him as President of the Imperial 
University. On the nth of June of the same year, the 
College of Agriculture was added to the University, as the 
result of the Imperial Ordinance No. 92, according to which 
the College of Agriculture and Dendrology was made one 
of the colleges of the Imperial University, and of the Im- 
perial Ordinance No. 93, according to which the College of 
Agriculture was included under Article X of the Imperial 
Ordinance for the Founding of the Imperial University. 

The College of Agriculture and Dendrology came into 
existence by the Imperial Ordinance No. 56, proclaimed on 
the 22nd July, 1886, which abolished the Komaba Agricul- 
tural College, and the T6ky6 Dendrological College, and 
established the said College of Agriculture and Den- 
drology. 

The Agricultural College owes its existence to the 
establishment of the Nojishugakujo (Place for studying 
Agriculture) started in 1874 ^^ Nait6 Shinjiku, a compound 
belonging to the Industrial Board of the Department of 
the Interior, where students were taught agriculture. The 
said institution was designated by the new name of N5- 
OAKKO (Agricultural College) in October, 1877, and in 
December of the same year, removed to the building at 
Komabano, then completed. 

In: January, 1878, the then Minister of the Interior, 
Toshimichi Okubo, presented to the college, as a reserve 
fund, two years' share of his shOtenroku (pension for signal 



HISTORICAL SUMMARY. II 

merit) which amounted to the sum of over 5,400 yen. In 
April, 188 1, the College was placed under the management 
of the Agricultural Bureau of the Department of Agri- 
culture and Commerce* 

The Dendrological College owes its origin to the esta- 
blishment of the Jumoku-Shikenjo (the place for experi- 
ments on plants and trees) at Nishigahara, Kitatoshima- 
gfiri, in 1877, by the Geographical Bureau of the Home 
Department, and in April, 1881, that institution was placed 
under the control of the Bureau of Forestry of the Depart- 
ilnent of Agriculture and Commerce. In November, 1882, 
its name was changed to the Tokyo SANRin GakkO (TokyO 
Dendrological College). In April 1886, this College, to- 
gether with the Agricultural College^ was placed under 
the direct control of the Department of Agriculture and 
Commerce. 

On the I2th of July of the same year. His Imperial 
Majesty the Emperor visited the University and viewed 
lecture rooms, laboratories &c. of the Colleges of En- 
gineering and Science. 

On the 2nd of October of the same year, a Committee 
for the compilation of Geographical Records, known as 
Chishihensan gakari, w&s appointed. It owes its existence 
to the fact that the work of the last Chishika in the Chiri- 
kyoku was placed under the supervision of the Imperial 
University. On the 6th of November, the Imperial Ordi- 
nance No. 269 was issued, whereby the Art. XI. of the 
Imperial Ordinance relating to the Founding of the Im- 
perial University was modified, and the Art. XIV. thereof 
cancelled. The Imperial Ordinance No. 270 modified the 
existing regulations regarding the ranks of the ofiicial 



12 HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 



Staff to the Imperial University, at the same time fixings 
their number. 

In the same month, the graduates of the College of 
Agriculture were permitted to call themselves, NSgakushi, 
Ringakushi and Juigakushi according to their respective 
study. 

On the 31st of March, i8gi, the " Temporary Committee 
for the Compilation of the National History '* and the 
** Committee for the Compilation of the National Geogra- 
phical Records" were amalgamated into a single "Com- 
mittee for the Compilation of the National History and 
Geographical Records." 

On the 24th of July, the Imperial Ordinance No, 136 
fixed anew the number of the officers of the University ; the 
Ordinance No. 139 determined the salaries of the higher 
officials of the University, the schools under the direct 
control of the Department of Education and of the 
Public Library, and Ordinance No. 140 fixed the number 
of Professors and Assistant-Professors of the University. 

On the 15th of August, the length of the curricula in 
the College of Law was extended to four years. 

On the i8th of August, 1892, the new Library Buildings, 
for some time under construction, were completed. On 
the 8th of September, the Arts. VIII and IX of the Imperial 
Ordinance for the Founding of the Imperial University 
were modified by the Imperial Ordinance No. 75. 

On the 30th of March, 1893, Hiroyuki Kato, President 
of the Imperial University, retired from the office of Presi- 
dent and Arata Hamao, Director of the Bureau of Special 
Schools of the Department of Education, and Member of 
the late Senate, was appointed President of the Imperial 
University. On the 31st of the same month, the depart- 



^ 



HISTORICAL SUMMARY^ 1 3 

merits of Zoology and Geology were removed to the new 
building just completed, which is one part of the buildings 
designed as an Institute for Natural Hiatorj' of the College 
of Science. On the loth of April, the Committee for the 
Compilation of National History and Geographical Records 
was abolished on account of this compilation being dis- 
continued for some time. In the same month, the situa- 
tion of buildings for the future Medical College and its 
Hospital was decided upon, since a new building contain- 
ing the departments of ophthalmology, gynaecology, 
obstetrics, and paediatrics, including patients' rooms, was 
about to be erected. In July, the Library was removed to 
the new building. On the loth of August, the Articles of 
the Imperial Ordinance for the Founding of the Imperial 
University were altered by the Imperial Ordinance No. 82, 
and the Imperial Ordinance No. 83 respecting the Officers 
of the Imperial University and the Imperial Ordinance 
No. 84, concerning the salaries of the professors of the 
Imperial University, were issued. On the 24th of the same 
month, the Imperial Ordinance No. 88 determined the 
salaries of the higher officials of all the institutions under 
the direct control of the Educational Department, and of 
the Tokyo Library. 

On the 2nd of September, the regulations of the 
' College of Law were changed so as to abolish the grade 
system, and the courses of study, subjects for lectures and 
regulations for the examinations were newly constituted. 
On the 7th of the same month, the chairs of professorship, 
and their number were established by the Imperial Ordin- 
ance No. 93, namely, twenty two chairs in the College of 
Law, twenty three in the College of Medicine, twenty one 
in the College of Engineering, twenty in the College of 



14 HiSTCKlCAL SUMMARY. 

Literature, seventeen in the College of Science and twenty 
in the College of Agriculture. 

On the 1st of April, 1895, a Committee, for the Com- 
pilation of Materials for the History of Japan, was formed in 
the College of Literature. This Committee will continue 
the work of the former Committee for the Compilation of 
National History and Geographical Records, — the Com- 
pilation to be completed within five years. On the i6th of 
the same month, the building containing th^ new detached 
lecture-rooms of the Law College, was completed. On the 
22nd of the same month, the number of the Regular Profes- 
sors of the Imperial Univeristy was increased by Imperial 
Ordinance No. 52 from seventy five to eighty-one; and the 
former regulation limiting each class of the principal salaries 
attaching to the Professorships, was modified by Imperial 
Ordinance No. 53. The number of chairs for Botany was 
6n the same day increased from one to two, by Imperial 
Ordinance, No. 54;- 

On the 6th of May of the same year, three hundred and 
thirty-six c/jo, ^taftf one se, and one bu of forest at Kiyosumi, 
Nagasagori, in Chiba-ken, was given by the Government to 
the Univeristy for use in the teaching of Practical Forestry 
in the regular course of the College of Agriculture. 

On the 4th of Marth, i8g6, a piece of land (private 
property), measuring nine tan, six se, and twenty-nine bu, 
part of the grounds of the ancient Castle of Arai at Koajiro, 
Misakimachi, MiuragOri, in the province of Sagami, was 
transferred to the University in exchange for some property 
belonging to the University. The present Marine Biological 
Station is to be removed to this place ; the situation being 
excellently suited for the work of the Marine Station, and 
the completion there of the laboratory equipments. Oh 



4i 



HISTORICAL SUMMARY. ij 

the ist of April, the regulations concerning the Hospital of 
the Medical College was modified, chiefly to allow of the 
admission of free patients, so as to supply more subjects 
for clinical lectures, and for demonstrations in Pathological 
Anatomy. By this amendment larger facilities and better 
opportunities for Medical investigation have been secured. 

On the 5th of May, the regulation concerning the num- 
ber of Professors and Assistant- Professors was amended by 
Imperial Ordinance No. 174 ; the number of Regular Pro- 
fessors to be eighty-six, and of Assistant- Professors thirty- 
eight. The number of Professors and Assistant- Professors 
as previously arranged in relation to each class of principal 
salaries, was also changed by Imperial Ordinance No. 175. 
On the same day, the nuniber of chairs in Mechanical,' 
Engineering, Applied Chemistry, and Mining and Metal-' 
lurgy was changed, an additional chair being established for 
each course. 

On the 22nd of June, the new Hospital-Buildings of the 
Medical College, containing the departments of ophthal- 
mology. Gynaecology, Obstetrics, Paediatrics, and Der- 
matology, together with rooms for patients, lecture-rooms, 
and laboratories were completed. About the same tim- 
were completed the new buildings of the Engineering Cole 
ege, to contain the departments of Applied Chemistry, and 
Mining and Metallurgy. All these had been for a con- 
siderable time under construction. In September, the 
departments of Applied Chemistry, and of Mining and Me- 
tallurgy, were removed to the new buildings. In the same 
month, the medical departments before mentioned, with the 
exception of Dermatology, were removed to the new 
Hospital Buildings. On the 2nd of October, by Imperial 
Ordinance No. 318, Articles 2, 3, 5, and 7 of the regulations 



l6 HISTORICAL SUMMARY. 

concerning salaries of Professors of the Imperial University, 
were modified ; and Article 9 rescinded. 

The University finance is regulated by a special law* 
The Law No. 26, issued on the 27th of March, 1890, esta- 
blished the financial regulations of the government schools 
and library, whereby the Imperial University was especial- 
ly empowered to hold its own funds and pay its yearly 
expenditure out of government appropriations, incomes 
from funds, tuition fees, donations in money, and all other 
sources of income. The University funds consist of the 
sum of money already accumulated, real and personal 
property donated either by the government or by private 
individuals and the balance left over each year. Other 
donations in money made for special purposes are manag- 
ed apart from the above funds. 



UI. IMPERIAL OBIHNANCE FOR THE FOUNDING 
OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 



Imperial Ordinance No. 3. (March Ist, 1886) 

(The follwing modifications were made in the onginal 
OnSinance : Art. X modified by the Ordinance No. 93, dated 
the nth of June, 1890 ; Art. XI by the Ordinance No. 26<)v 
dated the 6th of November, 1890, and Art. XIV rescinded ; 
Arts. VIII and IX modified by the Ordinance No. 75, d^ted 
tftc 8th of September, 1892 ; and Arts. V— XIII by the 
Ordinance No. 82, dated the loth of August, 1893, and 
Arts. XIV— XIX added.) 

ART. I.— The Imperial University shall have for ite 
objects the teaching of such arts and sciences as are re- 
quired for the purpose of the State, and the prosecution of 
original investigations in such arts and sciences. 

ART. II. — The Imperial University shall consist of 
the University Hall and the Colleges: the University Hall 
being established for the purpose of original investiga- 
tions, and the Colleges for that of instruction, theoretical 
a^nd practical. 

ART. Ill— Certificates of graduation shall be award- 
ed to students, who shall have completed any one of the 
courses in the Colleges, and shall have passed the examina- 
tions prescribed by the statute. 

ART. IV. — ^The Degrees shall be conferred upon 
those who either being graduates of one ©f the Colleges or 
being deemed to be of equal standing with graduates, shall 



l8 IMPERIAL ORDINANCE. 

have prosecuted original investigations in the University 
Hall, and shall have passed the required examinations. 

ART. V. — The President of the Imperial University 
shall control all the affairs of the University and maintain 
its order. 

ART. VI. — A University Council shall be organized 
in the Imperial University. The Directors of all the Col- 
leges and one of the Professors of each College shall be 
the members of the Council. The President of the Im- 
perial University shall call the meetings of the Council and 
preside over them. 

ART. VII.— The Members of the University Council, 
who are Professors shall be formally appointed by the 
Minister of Eduction, but in each case that Professor 
shall be appointed who shall have been chosen at an 
election held by the Professors of his particular College. 
The term of the above membership shall extend over three 
years. After the expiration of such term the same Profes- 
sor may be re-elected. 

ART. VIII.— Matters to be submitted to the meeting 
of the University Council for its deliberation are as follows : 
(i) The establishment and abolishment of a course 
of study in any College. 

(2) Questions concerning chairs of professorship. 

(3) Regulations for the internal government of the 

Imperial University. 

N*B. If it is necessajy to suggest that an 
Imperial Ordinance or a Notification of the 
Educational Dpartment be issued, a draft of 
such suggestion shall be submitted, also, for 
deliberation. 

(4) Granting of Degrees. 



i'^ 



IMPERIAL ORDINANCE. f^ 

(5) Questions put' by the Minister of Education or 
by the President of the Imperial University. 

The University Council may submit suggestions to the 
Minister of Education with regard to higher education. 

ART. IX.— The Colleges of the University are as foU 
lows ; College of Law, College of Medicine, College €f 
Engineering, College of Literature, College of Science, and 
College of Agriculture. 

ART. X.^-The Director of each College shall manage 
the affairs connected with the instruction in his College. 

ART. XI. — The instructing staff of each College shall 
be as follows ; Professors and Assistant Professors. 

ART. XII. — The President of the Imperial University 
may appoint a Lecturer if necessary. 

ART. XIIL— The title of Honorary Professor may be 
granted by Imperial order either directly or through the 
recommendation of the Minister of Education to a person, 
who has done valuable service for the Imperial University 
or any work of great merit for the advancement of learning. 

ART. XIV. — A Faculty meeting shall be held in each 
College, and all the Professors 'of each College shall be 
members of the Faculty. The Director of each College- 
shall call the meetings of the Faculty of his College, and 
preside over them. 

ART. XV.— Matters to be submitted to the Faculty 
meeting for its deliberation shall be as follows ; 
(i) Curricula of studies. 

(2) Examinations of students. 

(3) Qualifications of candidates for Degrees. 

(4) Questions put by the Minister of Education of 

by the President of the Imperial University. 
ART. XVI. — The Director of the College may cause 



to IMPERIAL. ORDINANCE. 

an Assistant Professor or a Lecturer to be present at the 
Faculty meeting, if necessary. 

• ART. XVII.— Chairs shall be established in each 
College and each chair shall be occupied by a Professor, 
lif case there is any chair unoccupied by a Professpr, an 
Assistant Professor or a Lecturer may be entrusted with 
such chair. 

ART. XVIII. — The number of Chairs of Professorship 
and their character shall be estabished by another Imperial 
Ordinance. 

ART. XIX. — This Imperial Ordinance (Imperial Ordi- 
nance No. 82 dated the loth of August, 1893) shall be in 
fotce from the nth of September, 1893. 



1 



IV. IMPERIAL ORDINANCES RELATING, ONE TO 

THE OFFICERS OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, 

AND THE OTHER TO THE APPOINTMENT OF A 

FOREIGNER TO A PROFESSORSHIP. 



Imperial Ordinance No. 83, (August lotb, 1893). 

(The number of regular Professors was modified by 
the Ordinance No, 52^ dated the 22nd of April, 1895 •; the 
number of regular Professors, Assistant Professors and 
Assistants modified by the Ordinance No. 1741 dated the 
5th of May, 1896). 

ART. I. — The Officers of the Imperial University 
shall be as follows : President^ Secretary and Clerks, 

ART. II — The President shall be of chokunin rank 
and shall have charge of all the affairs of the Imperial 
University, and have control over all the subordinate 
officers, under the superintendence of the Minister Qf 
Education, and in accordance with the articles of the 
Imperial Ordinance for the Founding of the Imperial Univ- 
ersity. As to the appointment, promotion, &c. of the 
higher officials, the President shall submit his suggestions 
to the Minister of Education ; the appointment, &c. of the 
lower officials shall rest entirely with, himself. 

ART. Ill, — There shall be one Secretary (proper) and 
he shall be of sonin rank. He shall manage, under the 
direction of the President, all affairs relating to th^ ad- 
ministration and the treasury of the Imperial University: 

ART. IV.— The Clerks shall be of hannin rank and 



22 IMPERIAL ORDINANCE. 

serve in the business relating to the University administra- 
tion and treasury. The nuniber of Clerks of the University 
and the Colleges shall be fifty-two in all. 

ART. V. — Besides the officers mentioned in Art. I.. 
there shall be four Superintendents of Dormitories, and 
they shall be appointed by thjs Minister of Education from 
among the Professors and Assistant Professors. The 
Superintendents of Dormitories 'shall control the dormi- 
tories under the direction of the President. 

ART. VI.— The Officers of the College shall be a» 
follows: Professors, Assistant Pro/essorSy Assistauts^ Clerks. 

ART. VII. — The Professors shall be of sonin or cho^ 
kunirK rank and shall occupy the Chairs ; they shall inr 
struct the students and give them guidance in the pursuit 
of their studies. The Professor who is Director of a 
College or the Principal of the Hospital may not occupy 
any chair. The number of Regular Professors shall be 
eighty six. The number of the Professors of chokunin 
rank shall not exceed twelve. 

ART. VIII. — The Assistant Professors shall be of sonin 
rank and shall assist in the duties of the Professor with 
regard to instruction and practice. The number of regular 
Assistant Professors shall be thirty eight. 

ART. IX— The Assistants shall be of hannin rank 
iand shall perform, under the direction of the Professor or 
Assistant Professor, such services as relate to Science and 
Art. The number of Assistants shall be eighty three. 
i ART.. X. — Besides the officers mentioned in Art. VI, 
there shall be one Director in each College, and he shall 
lie one of the Professors of the College and appointed to 
the office of Director by the Minister of Education. The 
Director of the College shall take charge of the college affairs 



IMPERIAL ORDINANCE. 23 

under the superintendence of the President of the Imperial 
University, and in accordancewith the articles of the Imperial 
Ordinance for the Founding of the Imperial University. 

ART. XI. — In the Hospital belonging to^^the College of 
Medicine, there shall be one Principal, and he shall be one 
of the Professors of the College of Medicine and appointed 
to the office of Principal by the Minister of Education. 
The Principal of the Hospital shall manage the affairs of the 
Hospital and oversee the business of its officers, under the 
superintendence of the President of the Imperial University. 

ART. XII.— In the Tdkyo Astronomical Observatory 
belonging to the College of Science, there shall be one 
Director, and he shall be one of the Professors of. the 
College of Science and appointed to the office of Director 
by the Minister of Education. He shall manage the 
affairs of the Observatory under the superintendence of 
the President of the Imperial University. 

ART. XIII. — This Imperial Ordinance shall be in 
force from the nth of September, 1893. 



Imperial Ordinance No. 96- (September 9th^ 1893) 

When, in the Imperial University and in the schools 
under the direct control of the Department of Education, 
it shall be necessary, for instruction in some branch of 
study, to appoint a foreigner to take the duty of the Pro- 
fessor or Teacher, the President bf the University and 
Directors of such schools may appoint him to do so, with 
the permission of the Minister of Education. 



V. IMPERIAL ORDINANCE, RELATING TO 

THE CHAIRS OF PROFESSORSHIP IN THE 

CQUiEQSS OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 



Imperial Ordinance No. 93 (September 7ih, 1893.) 

(The number of Chairs for Botany in the College of 
Science was modified by the Ordinance No. 54, dated the 
22nd of April, 1895 5 '^^ number of Chairs for Mechanical 
Engineering, for Applied Chemistry and for Mining and 
Metallurgy modified by the Ordinance No. 176, dated the 
5th of May 1896). 

The number of Chairs of Professorship in the Colleges 
of the Imperial University and their character are esta- 
blished as follows : 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Constitution and Public Law 2 Chairs. 

Civil Code 3 »» 

Commercial Code i Chair. 

Code of Civil Procedure i 9*. 

Criminal Code and Code of Criminal Procedure ...i „ 

Political Economy and Finance 3 Chairs. 

Statistics I Chair. 

Politics and History ot Politics i ^ 

Administrative Law i 

International Law i 

History of Legal Institutions and Comparative 

History of Legal Institutions.^ i ,9 



ft 






j 



IMPERIAL ORDINANCB. 25 

Roman Law x Chair. 

English Law 2 Chairs. 

French Law i Chair. 

German Law i 

Jurisprudence i 



i9 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Anatomy 2 Chairs. 

Physiology i Chair. 

Medical Chemistry i „ 

Pathology and Pathological Anatomy 2 Chairs- 
Pharmacology I Chair. 

Medicine 3 Chairs. 

Gynaecology and Obstetrics i Chair. 

Paediatrics i ,, 

Surgery 3 Chairs. 

Ophthalmology i Chair. 

Dermatology and Syphilis i ,, 

Psychiatry i „ 

Hygiene i „ 

Forensic Medicine i „ 

Pharmacy 3 Chairs. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

CivU Engineering ...•....^.. ....* 4 Chairs. 

Mechanical Engineering... ..................3 „ 

Naval Architecture ,.....•.. . 2 ,, 

Technology of Arms .., , ..-. i Chair. 

Electrical Engineering 2 Chairs. 

Architecture 3 » 

Applied Chemistry , 3 ,1 



aS IMPERIAL ORDINANCE. 

Technology of Explosives i Chair. 

Mining and Metallurgy ; 4 Chairs< 

Strength of Materials and Structures i Chair. 

COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

Japanese Language, Japanese Literature and 

Japanese History 4 Chairs. 

Chinese Classics and Chinese Language 3 

History and Geography 2 

Philosophy and History of Philosophy 2 

Psychology, Ethics, Logic 2 

Sociology 






Pedagogics 



iEslhetics 

Philology 

English Language and English Literature 
German Language and German Literature 
French Language and French Literature ... 



Chair. 



1} 

I) 

a 
it 
it 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

Mathematics 2 Chairs. 

Applied Mathematics i Chair. 

Astronomy 2 Chairs. 

Physics 2 „ 

Chemistry ^ 2 ,, 

Zoology 2 ,, 

Botany v...... 2 „ 

Geology, Paleontology and Mineralogy 3 Chairs. 

Seismology * ...^ ^ Chair. 

Anthropology • i m 



IMPERIAL ORDINANCE. 27 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

Agriculture 2 Chairs. 

Agricultursfl Chemistry and Chemistry ....2 „ 

Forestry 3 ,, 

Botany i Chair. 

Zoology, Entomology and Sericulture 2 Chairs. 

Hortfculture i Chair. 

^ootechuy .....i „ 

Geology and Soils i „ 

Organic Physics and Meteorology i „ 

Agricultural Administration and Political Eco- 
nomy I ,t 

Veterinary Anatomy i ,, 

Physiology , i „ 

Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Surgery 3 Chairs. 

BY—LAW. 

This Imperial Ordinance shall be in force from the nth 
of September, 1893. 



YL XHPERIAL ORDINANCE RELATING TO TECS 
REGULATIONS FOR DEGREES. 



Imperial Ordlnanoe No. 13. (May 20th| 1887.) 

ART. I. — Degrees shall be of two classes, Hakushi an<l 
Daikakushi, 

ART. II.— The Degree of Hakushi shall be of five 
kinds ; — Hdgaku (Law) Hahushiy igaku (Medicine) Hatu- 
shi, Kdgaku (Engineering) Hahushi^ Bungaku (Literature) 
Haknshi, and Rigaku (Science) Hahushi, 

ART. III. — The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred 
by the Minister of State for Education upon such persons 
as have passed the prescribed examinations at the Univer- 
sity Hall ; and upon such others as, after reference to the 
Pouncil of the Imperial University, are considered by the 
Minister to possess attainments equal to, or higher than, 
those of the persons above mentioned. 

ART. IV.— The Degree of Daihakushi shall be confer- 
red by the Minister of State for Education, after reference 
to the assembly of Hakushi, and after approval received 
from the Cabinet, upon such persons as are deemed 
specially meritorious in science or arts. 

ART. V.—By-laws relating to the present Ordinance 
shall be made by the Minister of State for Education. 



Vn. BY-LAWS RELATING TO THE REGULATIONS 

FOR DEGREES. 



Notification No. 4- (June 25th, 1887) of the 
Department of Education. 

ART. I. — The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred 
as follows : — 

The Hogaku (Law) Hakushi shall be conferred upon 
persons who have specially studied the subjects prescribed 
in the College of Law ; the Igaku (Medicine) Hakushi, upon 
.persons who have specially studied the subjects prescribed 
in the College of Medicine; the Kdgaku (Engineering) 
Hakushi, upon persons who have specially studied th^ 
subjects prescribed in the College of Engineering; the 
Bungaku (Literature) Hakushi, upon persons who have 
specially studied the sudjects prescribed in the College of 
Literature; and the Rigaku (Science) Hakushi, upon per-r 
sons who have specially studied the subjects prescribed in 
the College of Science. 

ART. IL— The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred 
by the Minister of State for Education upon persons, whq 
have been admitted to the Universiy Hall and have passed 
the prescribed examinations thereof, after notice has been 
given by the President of the Imperial University. 

ART. in. — The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred 
by the Minister of State for Education upon such persons 
as are considered by him to possess attainments epual to, 
or higher than, those of persons who have been admitted 
to the University Hall and have passed the prescribed 
examination therein, provided that the qualifications of such 
candidates shall h^ve been first submitted to the CounciL 



3P BY-LAWS RELATING TO THE REGUtATIONS FOR DEGREES. 

of the Imperial University, and approved by not fewer 
than two- thirds of all the members of such Council. 

ART. IV. — Candidates for the Decree of Hakushi may 
lipply for the same to the Minister of State for Education ; 
each application to be accompanied by a brief personal 
record, together with a thesis composed by the candidate 
oh some subject specially studied by him. 

ART. V. — In the case of condidates under III., the 

■■..».-.' , '    '  

Qouncil of the Imperial University may, if necessary, hold 

examinations. 

N, B, — Such examinations are not compulsory. 

ART. VI. — The Degree of Z)a//ra^M5/jf shall be confer- 
red by the Minister of State for Education upon persons 
deemed by him specially meritorious in science or arts, 
whose qualifications, having been discussed by the As- 
sembly of Haknshi, shall have been approved by not less 
than two-thirds of the members actually present, and shall 

5  

afterwards have been snbmitted to, and comfirmed by, the 
Cabinet. 

ART. VII. — Matters relating to the Assembly of 
Haknshi shall be managed by a committee appointed by 
tlie Minister of State for Education, and no Asse;mbly 
shall be held unless at least twenty Hakushi be present. 

ART. VIII. — The place of meeting and the date of 
session of the Assembly of Hakushi shall in each case be 
published five weeks previously in the OfHcial Gazette. 

ART. IX. — Rules relating to the examination under 
Art, V. shall be framed by the President of the Imperial 
University. 

ART. X. — The forms for Degree Certificates shall 
be as follows :— 



BY-LAWS RELATING TO THE REGULATIONS FOR DEGREES. 3 1 



DEGREE certificate; 



Title, order of decoration, 

rank, legal residence, 

and social class. 

The Degree of Hakushi is hereby conferred 

on the aforesaid according to Arjt. III. of "Im- 
perial Ordinance No. 13 *' concerning Degrees, issued 
in the 20th year of Meiji. 

Dated this ...day of the. month of 

the year. 



Seal of the 
Department 

of 
Educsltion. 



1.^. 



 — ■»<■! 



Minister of Slate 
for Education, 
title, order of decoration, 
and rank, 
(seal). 



\ 



Counterfoil of seal. 



No, 



. 



* Certificates conferred under the 1st proviso of Art. III. of 
*' Imperial Ordinance No. 13 " relating to Degrees are distinguished 
by red borders ; those under the 2nd proviso, by green borders. 



32 BY-LAWS ItBLATlNG TO THE REGULATfOMS FOR DEGREES. 



DEGREE certificate; 



Title, order of decoration, 

rank, legal residence, 

and social class. 

The Degree of Daihakushi is hereby conferred on 
the afovesaid... according to Art, IV. of ** Im- 
perial Ordinance No. 13 *' conccrmng Degrees, issued 
in the 20th year of Meiji. 

Dated this day of the month of 

the year. 



Seal of the 
Department 

of 
Education. 



Minister of State 

for Education, 

title, order of decorat'on, 

and rank« 

(seal). 



\ 



Counterfoil of seal. 



/ 



-.-- 



/ 



No. 



• Th«se certificates are distingmished by black borders. 



Vin. REGULATIONS AS TO EXAMINATION FOR 

DEGREES OF THE STUDENTS OF THE 

UNIVERSITY HALL. 

ART. I.— -Students of the University Hall shall, after 
five years ' study, report on their studies through the Pro- 
fessor in charge to the President of the University and send 
in an application, together with a thesis on the subject of 
their study, for an examination for a degree. 

ART. II. — On receiving the application, the President 
of the University shall submit the matter to the faculty 
meeting of the respective Colleges to which the subject of 
the applicant's study belongs, for examinations as to his 
qualifications to the degree. 

ART. III. — The faculty meeting shall make the above 
examinations and report their opinions to the President. 



IX. UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 



President. 

ARATA HAMAO, LL. D. [Cantab). 

Members of the University Council. . 

MASAKAZU TOYAMA, Bungakuhakushi, M.A. (Michigan Univer- 
sity), Director and Professor of the College of Literature* 

KAUY FOUROUITSI, KOgakuhakushi, Ing^nieur des arts et manufac- 
tures, Licenci6 cs sciences. Director and Professor of the College of 
Engineering, 

KENJIRO YAMAKAWA, Rigakuhakush', Ph. B. (Yale University), 
Director and Professor of the College of Science, 

NAOKICHI MATSUI, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Columbia College), 
Director and Professor of the College of Agriculture, 

MASAAKIRA TOMII, HOgakuhakushi, Docteur en droit (Faculty 
de droit de Lyon), Director and Professor of the College of Law, 

GENTATSU HAMADA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Director and Pro- 
fessor of the College of Medicine, 

KAKICHI MITSUKURI, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins 
University), Professor of the College of Science, 

MASANORI OGATA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Professor of the College 
of Medicine, 

KINGO TATSUNO, KOgakushi, KOgakuhakushi, Professor of the 
College of Engitteering, 

KENZO WADAGAKI, Bungakushi, HOgakuhakushi, Professor of the 
College of Law, 

CHIYOMATSU ISHIKAWA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D., 
(Freiburg University), Professor of the College of Agriculture. 

TETSUJIRO INOUYE, Bungakushi, Bungakuhakushi, Professorofthe 
College of Literature, 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 35 

Secretaries. 

KENZO WADAGAKI, Bungakushi, HOgakuhakushi, Professor of the 
College of Law. 

HIKOGORO shimizu. 

Principal of the Hospital. 

HOGARA UNO, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Professor of the College of 
Medicine, 

Director of the A stronomical Observatory. 

HISASHI TERAO, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Licenci^ ^s sciences 
et mathematiques (Faculty des sciences de Paris), Professor of the 
College of Scietice. 

A cting Superintendents of Dormitories. 

HIKOGORO SHIMIZU, Secretary of the University, 
MANKICHI SAITO, Nogakushi, Assistant Professor of the College of 
Agriculture, 

Curator of the Botanic Garden. 

JINZO MATSUMURA, Rigakuhakushi, Professor of the ColUge of 
Science, 

Librarian. 

MANKICHI WADA, ^Ving9ka^\ix, Assistant Professor of the College of 
Literature, 

IWeasiirer. 

MUTSU NAGOYA, 



^ UNIVERSITY OFFICBRS. 

Chairman of the Health Committee. 

GENTATSU HAMADA. Igakushi. Igakuhakushi, Director and Pro- 
fessor of the College of Medicine, 

Members of the Health Committee. 

KENJI OSAWA, Igakuhakushi. M. D. (Strassburg University), Pro- 
fessor of the College of Medicine, 

MASANORI OGATA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Professor of the College 
of Medicine, 

TANEMICHrAOYAMA. Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Professorofthe Col- 
lege of Medicine, 

HIKOGORO SHIMIZU, Secretary of the University. 

HOGARA UNO, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Professor of the College of 
Medicine. 

TATSUTARO NAKAMURA, KOgakushi, Professor of the College of 
Engineering. 

Committee for the Water-supply of the University 

Compounds. 

CHARLES DICKINSON WEST, M. A., C. E. (Dublin University), M. 
I. Mech. E. (London), Professor of the College of Engineering. 

Superintendent of the Water-supply Department 
and of the Warming Apparatus. 

BUNJI MANO, KOgakushi. KOgakuhakushi, Pro/^ssor 0/ ^A<f College of 
Engineering. 

Superintendent of the Gas-Light Department. 

TOYOKICHI TAKAMATSU, Rigakushi, KOgakuhakushi, Professor 
of the College of Engineering. 



UIVERSITY OFFICERS. 37 

Superintendent of the Electric Lighl-Department. 

KOGORO WAT an ABE, KOgakushi, Assistant Professor of the College 
of Engineering. 

Superintendent of Building. 

TATSUTARO NAKAMURA, KOgakuBhi, Professor of the ColUge of 
Engineering, 



X. GENERAL REQULATIONS FOR THE 

COLLEGES. 



I. ACADEMIC YEAR, TERMS, AND VACATIONS. 

I. — The academic year begins on the nth of Septem- 
ber and ends on the loth of July. 

2. — The academic year is divided into three terms. 
The first term, comprising one hunrded and five days, ex- 
tends from September nth to December 24th ;' the second 
term of eighty-three days extends from January 8th to 
March 3i8t; and the third term of ninety-four days ex- 
tends from April 8th to July loth. 

3. — The Winter Vacation comprises two weeks, com- 
mencing on the 25th of December and ending on the 7th 
of January; the Spring Vacation, one week, commencing 
on the I St of April and ending on the 7th of the same 
month ; and the Summer Vacation, two months, commenc- 
ing on the nth of July and ending on the loth of September. 

4. — Lectures are suspended on Sundays and on the 
Holidays mentioned in the Calendar, pages 2 and 3. 

^, — At the beginning of each term, hours of lectures 
are determined according to the regulations of each College. 
In case practical works are to be done without the term, 
they shall be undertaken during the time of vacations. 

2. CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION AND 

ATTENDANCE. 

I. — Students are admitted to the Colleges of the Uni- 
versity at the beginning of each academic year. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 39 

2— Before stndents are admitted to any first year class 
^or as candidates for the first examination, in case of the 
College of Law), they must either produce a certificate of 
having completed a course, preparatory to the collegiate 
courses of the University, in one of the Higher Schools, or a 
similar course in a Higher Middle School, or a certificate 
of such schools as have been recognized by the Minister 
of Education to have a course of instruction similar to the 
above preparatory course, or show, upon examination held 
at any such Higher School, or Higher Middle School as 
above mentioned, on notice of any of the Colleges, the same 
degree of proficiency as those who have completed the 
above preparatory course. If the applications for permis- 
sion to follow any course, exceed the maximum number, 
admissible to that course, as previously aunounced under 
existing circumstances, the candidates shall undergo com- 
petitive examination on subjects of the course preparatory 
to the collegiate courses of the University ; and by the 
results of this examination, the admissions shall be deter- 
mined. 

3. — Candidates for admission to the 2nd or 3rd year 
<:lasses (or 4th year class in the Course of Medicine), are 
first examined in the subjects necessary for admission to a 
first year class, and afterwards upon the subjects pursued by 
the class, which they propose to enter, in order to determine 
whether they shall be admitted or not. 

4.— Candidates for admission are required to present 
to the Director of the College which they propose to enter, a 
written application in accordance with the forms prescribed. 

N. B. Those who are to be examined at the Univ- 
ersity for admission, must apply before June i6th of each 
year. 



40 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR Ti:£ COLLEGES. 

5.— Candidates, who undergo an entrance examination 
held at the University, are required to pay a fee of five 
yen to the University. The fee, however, shall not be 
returned to any candidate, though he withdraw the ap- 
plication of his own accord before the date of examination. 

6. — When a student is admitted to any one of the 
Colleges, he is required to pay a fee of two yen for admis- 
sion. A student, who is re-admitted to the same Colleg-e 
which he has left, or who is transferred from one Colleg-e 
to another is also required to pay the same fee. 

7. — When a student is admitted to any one of the 
Colleges, he is required to take the prescribed oath, and 
to sign his name in the College Register. He must also- 
present a written declaration, according to the prescribed 
form, signed by two sureties who are responsible for hint 
in all matters involved in his connection with the College. 
Sureties must be male persons above 21 years of age, who- 
possess land or a house within the jurisdiction of the Toky(V 
City Administration, or such other persons as the Univer- 
sity may deem suitable and trustworthy. 

8. — If a surety dies or loses any of the necessary 
qualifications stated in Article 7, he must at once be replac- 
ed, and a new written declaration must be signed by his 
successor. 

g.^When a surety desires to be absent from his fixed 
residence for a period longer than four weeks, he must, 
before his departure, state his intention to be absent, and 
provide a representative having power of attorney. If 
both sureties be absent at the same time for a period of 
less than four weeks, a representative must be provided,, 
and if their absence be longer than four weeks, a second 
representative must also be provided. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 4I 

10. — A graduate of any College of the University who 
applies for re-admission to pursue another course of study, 
and a student who, haivng voluntarily left any of the Col- 
leges, applies for re-admission to the same class, with which 
he was associated when he left the College, in order to 
pursue his former course, may be admitted at the begin- 
ning of the first term, without examinations. 

II. — The admission of a student, who, being unable 
through sickness, or from any other causes, to continue the 
course which he has previously chosen, applies for chang- 
ing the said course, as well as of a student, who, having 
voluntarily left any of the Colleges, applies for re-admis- 
sion to pursue any xourse other than that, which he was 
previously taking, shall be determined by articles 2 and 3, 
or such a student may be admitted without examination if 
his preparatory training for the proposed course of study 
be satisfactory. 

12. — A student who, by reason of misconduct, idleness, 
or chronic sickness, is considered by the President unfit to 
continue any longer a student of the College, receives 
notice of dismissal from the Pirector. 

13. — A student desirous of leaving the College, must 
present a written application to that effect, signed by 
himself and one of his sureties. 



3. SUSPENSION OF ATTENDANCE. 

I. — When a student who is suffering from sickness 
considers that there is no likelihood of recovery sufficient 
to enable him to resume his studies within the space of 
two months, he may suspend his attendance at the 



42 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 



or 



Colleges during the current academic year, after obtainin 
permission from the Director of the College. 

2. — A student who has obtained permission to suspend 
his attendance at a College, shall, at the beginning of the 
following academic year, enter the class of the grade to 
which he belonged, when he obtained the said permission. 

3. — No tuition fee is demanded of a student, who, has 
obtained permission to suspend his attendance at a College, 
during the period of such suspension. 

If he is in receipt of a loan or other scholarship, or is 
a government cadet, the payment of such scholarship or 
cadetship is also suspended. 

If such student recover from his sickness at an earlier 
date than he expected, he may, by obtaining special per- 
mission, attend classes, and in this case he is required to 
pay his tuition fee. 

4. — When a student makes an application to the 
Director of his College for permission to suspend his 
studies, the Director may grant his request if he consider 
it reasonable, subject to the approval of the Principal of 
the Hospital of the Medical College to whom the matter 
must always be referred. 

5.-— When the matter above mentioned is referred to 
him, the Principal of the Hospital shall appoint a com- 
mittee to examine into the state of health of the applicant, 
and shall inform the Director of the College of the result 
of their inquiry. 

4. EXAMINATIONS AND CERTIFICATES. 

I, — The annual examination commences on June 21st 
(or 22nd if the 21 st be a Sunday), when students are ex- 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR FHB COLLEGES* 43 

amined on all subjects studied during the year ; but should 
the instruction in any subject be completed during the first 
or second term, the examination on that subject may be held 
at the time of such completion. With regard to practical 
work carried out by students in laboratories, workshops, 
or any other place, the Instructor has the option of decid- 
ing whether or not an annual examination shall be held. 
In the annual examination of the 4th year class of Medicine 
and the 3rd year class of Pharmacy in the College of 
Medicine, students are not examined on the subjects in- 
cluded in the graduation examinations. 

2. — The term mark for the work done during each 
term in each subject shall be determined by written exam- 
inations, essays, or exercises, or by any other means the 
Instructor may prefer. If a student has given no means of 
determining his term marks, on account of absence during 
the whole term and at the term examination, or from other 
-causes, his term marks shall be reckoned as zero. 

3. — The year mark of a student in each subject at the 
end of each academic year shall be determined by adding 
twice the average mark for the term work to the marks 
obtained at the annual examination, and then dividing the 
sum thus obtained by 3. 

Where any subject is studied during only one term, 
the year mark of the student in that subject shall be 
determined in the same way, the term mark being taken 
as the average mark for the term work. 

N,B, — In the case of practical work done by students 
when no annual examination is held, the average mark for 
the term will be considered the year mark. 

4. — The general average of the student for each 
academic year is determined by dividing the sum of the 



44 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

year marks (obtained by the method mentioned in the 
foregoing article) in all the subjects, by the number of the 
subjects. 

5. — Each Professor or Instructor shall report to the 
Director the term marks at the end of each term, and the 
marks for the annual examination, as soon as possible after 
the date of examination. 

6. — At the end of every academic year after the final 
examinations, a list of each class is posted up, with the 
names of the students arranged according to merit, show- 
ing also promotion or degradation. 

7. — At the end of each academic year, students are 
promoted, degraded, or dismissed according to the scheme 
given on the next page. Students who have failed in an 
examination are not allowed to be re-examined under any 
circumstances. 

8. — Students who are absent from the annual examina- 
tion are degraded, but in cases where term averages ob- 
tained during the year are such as, according to the schen^e 
on the next page, entitle them to promotion, a special 
examination will be held for them at the beginning of the 
next academic year. 

g. — Students, who are degraded according to Article 
7, are required to attend the same class from the first term 
of the next year, and to pursue all the subjects studied by 
that class. They may somtimes be exempted from attend- 
ing lectures on those subjects which are studied only 
during one year or a portion of year, and on which they 
have passed their examinations ; but they must be present 
at all examinations held during the year. 

10. — Any student who has been degraded in two- 
successive years is dismissed. 



• 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CCLLBGBS. 



45 



GENERAL 
AVERAGE. 


YEAR MARK. 
UNDER 60. 








Number 

of 
subjects. 


Lowest. 


Next 
Lowest. 


UISrOoAi^ vr aiuw&nA. 


60 to 100 


None. 






Promoted. 


do. 


X. 


50 to 59+ 




do. 


do. 


X. 


to 49 




Degraded: ' 


But if either" 
term aver- 
age or final 
examination 
mark is 60 
, or over, 


- Promoted. 


do. 


3. 


30 to 59-1- 




Degraded: 


But if either^ 
term aver- 
age or final 
examination 
mark in 
either of the 
two is 60 or 
Vover, f 


Promoted. 


do. 


2. 


401049.^ 


50 to 59-1- 


Degraded : - 


'But if either 
term aver- 
age or final 
examination 
mark in both 
lis 60 or over,, 


- Promoted. 


do. 


a. 


to 49-f- 




do. 


do. 


3 or 
more. 


to 59 -j- 




do. 


50 to59 + 


X or 2. 


to59-|- 




do. 


do. 


3 or 
more. 


40to59-|- 




do. 


do. 


do. 


to 39-1" 




Dismissed. 


40 to 49 -f- 


z. 


to 49+ 




Degraded. 


do. 


2 or 
more. 


to 49+ 




Dismissed. 


to 39 -f- 


X or 
more. 


t0 39-j- 




do. 



46 GENERAL REGULATAIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

11, — Special regulations are given for the examinations 
of the College of Law, for the graduation- examination of 
the College of Medicine, for the examinations of the College 
of Engineering, and for the graduation in Veterinary 
Medicine of the College of Agriculture. 

12. — At the end of every academic year, those students 
of the third year courses of the Colleges of Literature, 
Scienece and Agriculture (The Veterinary Medicine Course 
excepted), whose term averages and annual examination 
marks entitle them to pass according to the schedule in 
Art. 7, those who are entitled to graduate according to the 
regulations for the examinations of the College of Law, 
those who have passed the graduation examination of the 
College of Medicine, those who are entitled to graduate 
according to the regulations for the examinations of the 
College of Engineering, and those who are entitled to 
graduate according to the regulations for the graduation 
in the Veterinary Medicine Course, shall receive graduation- 
diplomas of their respective Colleges according to the third 
article of the Imperial Ordinance for the Founding of the 
Imperial University. 

13.— The Graduates of the Colleges shall be permitted 
to assume, according to their respective studies, the titles 
of Hogakushi, Igakushi (Graduates of the Pharmaceutical 
Course, Yakugakushi), Kogakushi, Bungakushij Rigakushi 
and Nogakushi (Graduates in Dendrology, Ringakushi, 
and those in Veterinary Medicine yuigakushi). The ^wrt- 
igakiishi of the late TokyO University and such Graduates 
of the late Kobu-Daigaku as are not already Kogakushi, 
are permitted, if they still continue in their original profes- 
sion, to assume, with the President's special sanction, the 
titles o{ Igakushi and Kogakushl respectively 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES, 47 

S. POST-GRADUATE STUDIES. 

I. — A course of post-graduate studies is established in 
each College, for the benefit of students of the University 
Hall, and also for those graduates of the College who 
may desire to pursue further the studies of the course 
which they have already completed. Graduates other than 
students of the University Hall are admitted to this course 
only when circumstances allow. 

2. — Students of this Course are of two classes : holders 
of scholarships and other students. 

3. — Scholarships are allotted to students by the Direct- 
or of each College, with the sanction of the President aud 
the University Council, only in cases where the students 
take a course of study for which special encouragement 
and assistance may be required ; and the College gives to 
each holder of a scholarship a fixed sum for his monthly 
expenses in the College, and for the actual expenses incur- 
red in his scientific investigations. 

4. — Each holder of a scholarship receives a sum not 
exceeding 15 yen per month, (for any part of a month, 
according to the number of days), for his regular expenses 
in the College, and the necessary travelling expenses for 
scientific investigations, wthin the limit of the funds set 
apart for each student in each subject of study. A tuition 
fee is not demanded of any holder of a scholarship. 

5. — Students other than holders of a scholarship are 
required to pay a tuition fee and the actual expenses 
incurred in their own investigations, while those students 
in the University Hall, who are not holders of a scholar- 
ship, are not required to pay a tuition fee, but the whole of 



48 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

such expenses, including travelling expenses, or a certain 
portion of the whole, may be granted to them, by the 
College, when necessary, they being at the same time ex- 
empt from the payment of tuition fees, with the sanction 
of the President and the University Council. 

6. — The length of any course of post-graduate studies 
shall not be less than one year, nor greater than two years , 
but students of the University Hall may remain in this 
course longer than two years. 

7. — Students attending a course of post-graduate 
studies, who by reasons of misconduct, idleness, or chronic 
sickness may be considered unfit to prosecute their studies, 
are dismissed, subject to the approval of the President and 
the University Council. 

8.— At the close of the period for post-graduate 
studies, students are required to present to the Professor in 
charge a short statement of their scholastic career while in 
the College, and a written thesis treating of some branch of 
the study which they have been pursuing; and the Professor 
in question shall forward all such treatises to the Director 
of the College, accompanied by his remarks on the same. 

9. — If the Director of the College finds that the report 
made by the Professor on the papers above referred to be 
satisfactory, he shall certify the said report and give it to 
the student, and shall report his action to the President 
of the Uuiversity. 

10. — No surety is required for post-graduate students, 
and they may be permitted, on application, to live in the 
Dormitories, as circumstances permit. 

II. — Regulations for admission and payment of tuition 
fees, and all other regulations, hold good for students, 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 49 

following a course of post-graduate study, unless other 
special regulations are made. 

6. UNPAID ASSISTANTS. 

I. — Unpaid Assistants are appointed in the Institutes, 
Laboratories, Workshops and Hospitals belonging to the 
Colleges. 

2, — Unpaid Assistants must have been graduates either 
of one of the Colleges or of the University Hall, and are 
appointed at their own request by the President of the 
Imperial University upon recommendation of the Director 
of their respective Colleges, or the Principal of the 
Hospital. 

3. — Unpaid Assistants having the same privileges and 
duties as other Assistants, are required to comply with all 
the regulations of the University. 

4. — To those who have discharged the duties of As- 
sistants in a satisfactory manner for a period of more than 
two years, certificates of merit are given by the President, 
acting on the request of the Director of the College or 
the Principal of the Hospital. 

7. ELECTIVE STUDIES. 

I. — Persons, not regular students, who wish to study 
one or more of the subjects prescribed in the courses in the 
Colleges may be admitted as elective students upon 
application at the beginning of each year. 

N.B. They may be permitted to pursue a part of the 
subject according to the nature of it, and when instruc- 
tion in any subject is to be commenced after the beginning 



50 GBNESAL REGULATIONS FOR THB COLLEGES. 

of the academic year, those who wish to study such 
subject may be admitted immediately before the commen- 
cement of such instruction. 

2. — The English, French or German language cannot 
be chosen as an elective study by students, unless a know- 
ledge of any one of them is necessary for the study of the 
special subjects chosen by them. 

3. — Elective students must be at least 19 years of age 
and such only shall be admitted as, after an examination 
by the Professors of th^ir elective studies, are considered 
by them capable of pursuing the proposed subjects. 

N. B. In the Medical Course in the College of Medi- 
cine, those graduates of the Medical Departments in the 
Higher Schools or the late Higher Middle Schools, of the 
Medical Schools of Kyoto, Osaka, and Nagoya, of the late 
Special Medical Course, and of the late Class A Medical 
School, and in the Pharmaceutical Course in the same 
College, those graduates of the Pharmaceutial Depart- 
ments in the Higher Schools or the late Higher Middle 
Schools and of the late Tsuugaku Pharmaceutial Course, 
and the graduates (Since Febiuary 1884) of the late 
Special Pharmaceutical Course, are admitted without exa- 
mination ; licensed medical practioners, pharmaceutists 
and apothecaries must show on examination the same 
degree of proficiency as the above graduates, before they 
are admitted to the Medical and Pharmaceutical Courses 
respectively. Such applicants may be admitted at any time 
to the College of Medicine whenever there are vacancies 
in the classes. 

4.— A student who has voluntarily left any one of the 
Colleges, may upon application, be admitted to an elective 
course. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 51 

5. — Elective students must pass the examination pre- 
scribed for regular students in the same subject, and may 
obtain, upon application to the Director of the College, 
certificates that they have finished their study in a special 
subject, if their term and final examination marks are 
such as would entitle regular students to a promotion. 

6. — The ordinary regulations for admission, payment 
of fees, and other requirements are applicable to eletcive 
students, unless special regulations be made for them. 

7. — A regular student of one of the Colleges may, 
besides his own regular course, choose and pursue, as an 
elective study, not more than two subjects in any other 
course in his own or any other College, when the Profes- 
sors of the regul^ and elective courses have certified his 
Witness to take such course. 

No student, however, is permitted to choose a subject 
prescribed for the upper classes of his regular course. 

8. — Students who have entered on the study of any 
subject are not permitted to abandon the same in favour 
of another subject, until the close of the academic year, or 
the termination of the work of the regular course in that 
subject 

9. — Arts. 4 and 5 do not apply to the elective stud* 
ents of the College of Medicine. 

8. HONOUR STUDENTS. 

I. — A student of any of the Colleges, who is distingui- 
shed for his scholastic attainments and good morals, may 
be made an honour student. 

2. — Honot^slirdents are nominated, upon the approv- 
al of the Presi<feii^ by the Director of each College, ac- 



52 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

cording to the results of the annual examination at the 
end of each academic year. 

3. — Honour students enjoy the privilege of exennptfon 
from tuition fees. 

4. — Honour students who by reason of misconduct, 
idleness, or sickness may be considered unfit to continue 
their studies, will be deprived of this honour. 

9. LOAN SCHOLARSHIPS. 

A. — REGULATIONS. 

I. — If a student takes a course of study, in one of the 
Colleges, for which special assistance may be required, and 
shows himself proficient in scholastic ^tainments and q£ 
good moral character, but is unable to meet his College 
expenses from his own private means, the President of the 
University may allot to such student a College loan 
scholarship of not exceeding eighty-five yen per annum 
during the academic year. 

2. — When requested by government offices, companies^ 
or private individuals, the President of the University may 
allot to students loan scholarships offered by these offices, 
companies, or individuals. 

3. — Loan scholarships are given for two objects : (a) 
in order to bind students to devote themselves, after 
graduation, to certain professions or occupations designated 
by the President of the University or the subscribers, as 
.the case may be, for the same number of years as such 
scholarships shall have been held, and {b) in order to 
promote and encourage university education. 

4. — The holder of a loan scholarship is bound, after 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 53 

.^graduation, to return monthly the sum of money he 
received monthly while in the University, so as to complete 
the reimbursement of the whole sum during the same 
number of years as that in which he received such 
.scholarship. The holder of a loan scholarship for the 
promotion of university education, must, in addition to the 
refunding of the sum of money, also pay back interest on 
the same at the rate of six per cent per annum. But the 
obligation to refund such money ceases with the death of 
the holder of the loan scholarship; and the family or. 
Sureties of the deceased shall not be responsible for such 
repayment. 

5. — Should the holder of a loan scholarship granted 
by a company or private individual fail, after gradua- 
tion, to engage in the profession or occupation designated 
by the subscriber, he may, after obtaining the consent of 
the company or individual, be released from his engage- 
ment, by returning the sum of money received in the form 
of a scholarship, together with interest on the same at the 
rate of six per cent per annum ; the said total to be paid at 
one time within thirty days after such consent has been 
obtained. 

6. — Interest payable on a loan scholarship is calculat- 
ed for the number of months from the month after the 
money was actually received, up to the month of returning 
the same. 

7. — Companies or private individuals desirous of offer*. 
ing loan scholarships, are requested to present to the. 
President of the University two copies of a written declara- 
tion to that effect and to obtain his acknowledgment for 
the same ; one of these copies shall be returned to the 
subscriber and the other shall be kept in the University.. 



54 G£NERAI« REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

8. — Candidates for loan scholarships shall submit to 
the Director of each College a written application settings 
forth the object of their studies and other details. 

9. — Successful candidates for loan scholarships shalF 
present to the President of the University two copies of a 
written declaration after a prescribed form, certifying their 
intention of fulfilling their obligations ; in the case of 
scholarships given by Government offices, companies or 
private individuals, a copy shall be sent to the subscriber, 
and the other shall be kept in the University with the- 
original declaration of the subscriber. 

10. — At the request of a candidate for any scholar- 
ship, and with the President's approval, the sum to be paid 
to him may be diminished, and if by doing so there be a 
surplus in the amount subscribed, the number of scholar- 
ships may be increased. 

II. — The subscribed fund and the payment of loan 
scholarship shall be intrusted to the Treasurer of the 
University. 

12. — If any holder of a loan scholarship be deemed 
unfit to continue so any longer, on account of misconduct, 
idleness, or sickness, he shall be deprived of the scholarship. 

B. — NUMBER OF SCHOLARSHIPS, 

There are scholarships offered by the Colleges of Medi- 
cine, Literature, Science, and Agriculture, by companies, 
and by private individuals. 

The scholarships at present held are as follows : 
2 Scholarships offered by the College of Medicine ta 

students of Pharmacy. 
1-8 Scholarships offered by the College of Literature. 



( 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 55 

13 Scholarships offered by the College of Science. 
9 Scholarships offered by the College of Agriculture. 

The funds for the above four classes of scholarships 

are drawn from the current expenditure of the Colleges and 

are awarded only to regular students of the University. 

21 Scholarships offered by the Mitsubishi Company to 
students of every College with the object of promot- 
ing higher education. 

I Scholarship offered by Mr. Ichibei Furukawa to a stu- 
dent of the College of Engineering, with the object 
of promoting higher education. 

7 Scholarships offered by Mr. Kichizayemon Sumitomo to 
students in the College of Engineering with the 
object of fostering engineering science. 

I Scholarship offered by Mr. Ryosaburo Hara to a student 
of the Colleges of Literature and Science, with the 
object of promoting higher education. 

I Scholarship offered by Mr.^IwAzo Kajima to a student in 
Civil Engineering in the College of Engineering with 
the object of fostering that branch of science. 

I Scholarship offered in memory of the late Mr. Shirodayu 
Takashima to a student in Technology of Arms or in 
Technology of Explosives in the College of Engineer- 
ing with the object of fostering these branches of 
Science. 

7 Scholarships offered by the late Zo-Udaijin Okubo to 
students in the College of Agriculture with the 
object of promoting higher education. 
There are also several scholarships such as those 

offered by Mr. JuNicpiRO Shimoyama, Seiyakushi together 

with other seventeen gentlemen, by Mr. Zenjiro Yasuda, 

by Mr. Aritsunb Yamagata, Igakushi^ and also those in 



56 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

memory of the lute Mr. Seishiu Shibayama and the late 
Mr. GiSABURo Tanabe. 

Besides the holders of scholarships offered by the Col- 
leges, there are twenty-four scholarships in the Medical and 
Pharmaceutical Course in the College of Medicine for those 
students of the War Department, who, in accordance with 
the desire of the Surgeon-General of the Army, have bound 
themselve to become army surgeons and army pharmaceutist 
on graduation; there are scholarships in the Veterinary 
Course in the College of Agriculture provided at the request 
of the War Department, for students who find themselves 
to become army veterinary surgeons ; and lastly there are 
several students in the Colleges who have come from fu 
and hen to study at the University at the expense of their 
respective prefectures. 



lo. SUSPENSION, FORFEITURE AND REPAY- 

MENT OF GOVERNMENT CADETSHIPS 

AND LOAN SCHOLARSHIPS. 

1. Whenever any holder of a government cadetship or 
loan or other scholarship has failed in the annual examin- 
ation, the payment of such cadetship or scholarship is sus- 
pended. 

Such scholars, as are frequently absent from classes 
forfeit their scholarship. 

2. Whenever any holder of a loan scholarship is 
deprived of his scholarship, or is expelled from the Univ- 
ersity, on account of misconduct or idleness ; or whenever 
he, for reasons of his own, wishes to resign the scholar- 
ship, or to retire from the University, he must without 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 57 

delay repay the whole amount of money he has received. 

Such students are not released from the obligations 
into which they entered by their written declaration. 

3. If a holder of a loan scholarship forfeits his 
scholarship by his failure in the annual examination, his 
repayment of the money he has, up to that time, received, 
may, however, be postponed until he has left the Univ- 
ersity. 

II. DONATIONS IN MONEY. 

Donations in money were received by the late Tokyo 
Daigaku from Mr. Kihei Kobayashi, Dr. Chutoku Ishi- 
GURO, some of the officers of the Government Printing 
Office, and from the friends of the late Mr. MotogorO 
Yenuma, an Assistant of the Tokyo Daigaku, as a tribute 
to his memory: and by the Kobu DaigakkO from the 
Minister of Public Works and the officers of his Depart- 
ment, and from the Manager of the Mitsui Bank. In 
connection with the late Tokyo Agricultural and Dendro- 
logical School there exists an endowment from the late Zo- 
Udaijin Toshimichi Okubo, Minister of the Interior. Some 
of these donations have already been disposed of according 
to the instructions of the several donors, such as for the 
purposes of purchasing books and instruments or giving 
assistance or encouragement, &c. 

In the present University, Hatakeyama scholarships 
have been founded in Law, Chemistry, and Engineering by 
the friends of the late Mr. Yoshinari Hatakeyama, M.A., 
an eminent Director of the T6kyo Kaisei Gakk6, to whose 
^eal and exertions that institution was indebted for the est- 
ablishment of the courses in Law, Chemistry and Engineer- 



58 GENBRAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

ing, and for its final development into the TOkyO Daigaku.. 

Donations in money were also lately received from Mr. 
IcHiBEi FuRUKAWA to aid in the promotion of Mining ; frono 
the friends, and in the memory, of the late Professor Mori- 
8ABUR6 IcHiKAWA, to aid in the promontion of Physics in the 
College of Science ; from Dr. Seiken Takenaka towards the 
fund of the Hospital of the Medical College ; and from the 
Association for Popular Lectures in German in aid of stu- 
dents suffering from illness who have no sufficient means. 
In memory of the late Mr. ShOjiro Hayakawa, a student of 
the Medical College, a sum was collected by his friends to 
purchase a disinfecting pan of German make, and books> 
for the use of students ; and similarly in memory of the 
late Mr. Yuji Sat5, a student of the Engineering College^ 
his friends contributed towards the fund for the encourage- 
ment of study. The Institution for Philological Research 
has proposed to make a monthly contribution towards the 
encouragement of Philological Research in the Literature 
College. In memory of the late Mr. Yoshisaburo Tanabe,^ 
an Engineer of the Home Department, contribution was 
made by his friends to found scholarships for the students, 
of Civil Engineering in the Engineering College. 

Contributions in memory of the late Mr. Seishiu Shi- 
BAYAMA and also of the late Mr. Shinzo Matsuo, Seiyakushiy 
were made by their friends to found scholarships for stu- 
dents in the Pharmaceutical Course in the College of 
Medicine. The donation in memory of the late Viscount 
Arinori Mori, Minister of Education, was made by the 
Committee having in charge his contribution to found 
scholarships. A donation in money was made by the 
members of the Nagasaki People Association in memory of 
* the late Mr. Shirodayu Takashima to found scholarships. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 59 

for the promotion of the Technology of Explosives as wel! 
as that of Arms. A donation in money for the promotion 
of the study of Law was made by Mr. Carl lilies of 
Germany to aid students selecting German Law according 
to the circumstances of the cases to be considered. Con- 
tributions in memory of the late Viscount Ki Inouye, Min- 
ister of Education were made by his friends to found scholar- 
ships for students in the University Hall or in the post- 
graduate course of Law with the object of promoting the 
study of International Law. A donation in money was 
made by Dr. L. [S. Loenholm of Germany to encourage 
the study of German Law and to found scholarships for 
students of Law selecting German Law. 

12. SCIENTIFIC EXCURSIONS. 

• 

In any case where a student in any one of the Colleges, 
or a student following a post-graduate course, may have to 
undertake a scientific excursion, the Director of the Col- 
lege shall order him to undertake the same, after the 
approval of the President has been obtained, and shall 
allow him his travelling expenses according to a fixed rate, 
within the limit of the funds set apart for each student in 
the different courses, as prescribed in the following page. 



Co GKN1-.R\L RKGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

LIMIT OF ALLOWANCES SET APART BY THE 
UNIVERSITY FOR EACH STUDENT IN 
THE DIFFERENT COURSES. 

Subject Student Student 

or in the post-graduate in the regular courses, 

courses. (To be paid (To be paid in 

Course, in a years.) 2nd & 3rd year.)* 

Yen, Yen. 

1. Law 50, — 

2. Pathology 50. — 

3. Pharmacology 50. — 

4. Hygiene 50. — 

5. Civil Engineering 180. 120. 

6. Mechanical ,, 150. 100. 

7. Naval Architecture 150, 100. 

8. Technology of Arms 150. 100. 

9. Electrical Engineering... 100. 60. 

10. Architecture 100. 60. 

11. Applied Chemistry 90. 60. 

12. Technology of Explosives 150. 100. 

13. Mining & Metallurgy ... 180. 120. 

14. Literature 50. — 

15. Physics 50. — 

16. Theoretical Chemistry ... 35. 35* 

17. Geology io8. 72. 

18. Botany 90. 60. 

19. Zoology 90. 60. 

20. Agriculture 80. 50. 

21. Forestry 150. 100. 

22. Veterinary Medicine 60. 40. 

* Only in certain cases will these allowances be granted to ist 
year students. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 6l 

13. FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES. 

I. — The tuition fee demanded of each student, both 
regular and elective, in the six Colleges, is two yen and 
fifty sen per month, which sum must be paid monthly, 
-from the month of his entrance to the month of his gra- 
.duation, departure, or dismissal, inclusive. 

N. B. — An incidental fee of one yen per month to 
cover the cost of materials used, is required of each student 
in the College of Engineering. 

2. — No tuition fee is required for the months of the 
summer vacation, viz,y July and August, nor for any month 
during the whole of which the College, to which the student 
belongs, happens to be closed. 

3. — A student who, on account of illness or other 
similar cause, is absent from his College during any entire 
month, is still required to pay the regular tuition fee for 
that month. 

4. — The tuition fee shall be paid to the Treasurer of 
the University on a fixed day in each month ; but in case 
where a student may have entered the College after such 
fixed day in any month, the fee for that month shall be 
paid on the fixed day in the following month. 

5. — For the sake of convenience students may pay the 
tuition fee for any number of months in advance, but the 
sum so paid in advance shall not be returned to them under 
any circumstances. 

6. — The necessary expenses of any one student of any 
College, who resides in the Dormitories or in the other 
boarding-houses, including the tuition fee, the cost of living, 
clothes, fire, and light, are about twelve yen monthly, 
according to the scale of living he may choose to adopt. 



62 GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE COLLEGES. 

14. REGULATION FOR VOLUNTARY 
MILITARY SERVICE. 

Those students of the colleges, who desire permission 
to enroll themselves as voluntary conscripts for one year^ 
shall be treated during their military service in accordance 
with the regulations for suspension of attendance and be 
permitted, on the expiration of their service, to reenter 
their former classes. 



XI. COLLEGE OF LAW. 
I. Officers* 



Director. 



MASAAKIRA TOMII, Hogakuhakushi, Docteur en droit (Faculty de 
droit de Lyon), Profesior, 

Professors, 

*NOBUSHIGB HOZUMI, H5gakuhakushi, Barrister-at-Law (Middle 

Temple). yurisprudence, 

MASAAKIRA TOMII, HOgakuhakushi, Docteur en droit (Facult6 de 

droit de Lyon). 
KENZO WADAGAKL Bungakushi, Hogakuhakushi, 

Political Economy f and Finance, 
HENRY T. TERRY, B.A. (Yale University), Counsellor at Law. 

English Law, 
MICHISABURO MIYAZAKI, HOgakushi, HOgakuhakushi. 

History of Legal Institutions, and Comparative 

History of Legal Institutions, 
YATSUKA HOZUMI, Bungakushi, H5gakuhakushi. 

Constitution, Public Law, and Administrative Law, 
KENJIRO OUME, HSritsugakushi, HOgakuhakushi, Docteur en droit 
(Faculty de droit de Lyon). Civil Code, 

LUDWIG S. LOENHOLM, Doctor Juris (Heidelberg University), 

Koenigl. Saechsischer Landgerichtsrath. German Law. 

NOBORU KANAI, Bungakushi, HOgakuhakushi. 

Political Eccnomy, and Finance, 

* The names of Professors, Assistant Professors, and Lecturers 
are arranged according to seniority of appointment. 



64 COLLEGE OF LAW. 

YASUSHI HIJIKATA, HOgakushi, HOgakuhakushi, Barrister-at-Law 

(Middle Temple). Civil Codcy and English Law. 

MICHEL RE VON, Docteur £s lettres (Faculty de Paris), Docteur 

en droit (Faculty de Grenoble). French Law. 

KITOKURO IKKI, HOgakushi. 

Constitution f Public Law and Administrative Lata, 
HIROTO TOMIZU, HOgakushi, Barrister-at-Law (Middle Temple). 

Roman Latv. 
TORU TERAO, H5rit8Ugakushi. International Law. 

KEIJIRO OKANO, HOgakushi. Commercial Code. 

ERNEST FOXWELL, B.A., M.A. (Cantab). 

Political Economy^ and Finance. 
KURANOSUKE MATSUZAKI, HOgakushi. Statistics. 

Assistant Professor. 

ASATARO OKADA, HOgakushi. 

Criminal Code and Code of Criminal Procedure. 

Lecturers. 

INEJIRO TAJIRI, HOgakuhakushi, B.A. (Yale University). 

Banking and Money, 
SADANAGA KOBA, Bungakushi, Ph. D. (Heidelberg University). 

Politics and History of Politics, 
JOZABURO KAWAMURA, HOritsugakushi. Civil Code. 

KOKWAI MAYEDA, Horitsugakushi. Code of Civil Procedure. 

ITASHI MATSUMURO, HOritsugakushi. 

Criminal Code and Code of Criminal Procedure* 



II. Courses of Instraction and Subjects. 

I. The following two Courses are established in the 

College : — 

I.— LAW. 

II.— POLITICS. 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 65 

2. Subjects for lectures in the Course of Law are as 
follows: — 

Constitution. 

Civil Code. 

Commercial Code. 

Code of Civil Procedure* 

Criminal Code. 

Code of Criminal Procedure. 

Administrative Law. 

Public International Law. 

Private International Law. 

History of Legal Institutions. 

Comparative History of Legal Institutions. 

Roman Law. 

English Law. 

French Law. 

German Law. 

Jurisprudence. 

Medical Jurisprudence (Optional). 

3. Subjects for lectures in the Course of Politics are as 
follows : — 

Constitution. 

Political Economy. 

History of Political Economy. 

Finance. 

Statistics. 

Public Law. 

Politics. 

History of Pohtics. 

Administrative Law. 

Public International Law. 



66 COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Private Intematioxral Law. 

History of Legal Institutions. 

Comparative History of Legal Institutions. 

Sociology, (optional.) 

Jurisprudence. 

Civil Code. 

Commercial Code. 

Criminal Code, General. 

Criminal Code, Special (optional.) 

4. Besides lectures in the above subjects, practical 
exercises shall be conducted, whereby students are trained 
in the pursuit of their studies by conversations, or essays 
or by any other means the Professor in charge of the 
exercises may choose. Subjects for practical exercises may 
be decided upon at the Faculty meeting. 

5. A student in one course may attend, for his optional 
study, lectures on any subjects in another course of the 
College or lectures in the other Colleges of the University. 
In the latter case, permission must be obtained from the 
Director of his College as well as from the Director of that 
College, which he desires to attend. He may attempt the 
examination in such optional study, only when he has 
obtained permission from the Professor whose lecture he 
has attended. 

in. Regulations for Examinations. 

I. Three Examinations shall be held ; students shall 
not be allowed to be present at the first examination, un- 
less they have studied at the College at least one year, nor 
at the second and third examinations, unless they have 
studied at the College at least one year after having 
passed the first and second examinations respectively. 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 6/ 

IThe third examination shall be considered the graduation 
iCxanai nation, and a special committee shall be appointed 
;for it. 

a. Examinations shall be held annually in June. 

But at discretion of the Professor he may conduct 
exano^ations under his charge at any other occasions than 
in June and the marks obtained at such occasional examin- 
.ations shall be added to those obtained at the annual ex- 
aminations. 

3. Subjects for examinations are as follows :~^ 

LAW. 
jFirst Examination, 

Civil Code. 

Criminal Code (General). 

Koman Law, 

Constitution. 

Comparative History of Legar Institutions. 

English Law. 

French Law. 

German Law. 

Second Examination, 

Civil Code. 

Criminal Code (Special). 
Code of Civil Procedure. 
Code of Criminal Procedure. 
Administrative Law. 
Public International Law. 
History of Legal Institutions. 
English Law. 
French Law. 
German Law. 



68 COLLEGE OF LAW* 

Third Examination, 

Civil Code. 

Commercial Code. 

Private International Law. 

Administrative Law. 

Jurisprudence. 

English Law. 

Erench Law. 

German Law. 
Students may select English, French or German Law, 
but he who has selected any one of the three at the first 
examination, shall have to select the same at the subsequent 
two examinations. 

- POLITICS. 

First Examination. 

Constitution. 

Public Law. 

Comparative History of Legal Institutions* 

Political Economy. 

Civil Code. 

Criminal Code (General). 

Second Examination. 

Political Economy. 

History of Political Economy. 

Statistics. 

Administrative Law. 

Politics. 

History of Politics. 

History of Legal Institutions. 

Public International Law. 

Civil Code. 



COLLEGE OF LAW, 6gr 

"Third Examination. 

Political Economy, 

History of Political Economy. 

Finance. 

Administrative Law. 

Private International Law. 

Civil Code. 

Commercial Code. 

Jurisprudence. 

4. A student is said to have passed, when he has 
obtained a mark above fifty per cent in every subject ex- 
amined and above sixty for the average mark. For an 
•optional study he must obtain a mark above sixty in each 
subject. 

5. A student, who has failed at any examination, 
-shall not be ^re-examined at the same examination session. 

6. At the graduation examination, students shall be 
examined on subjects of the first, and second examination 
hestdes those for the third examination. 

7. When a student has passed the examination on 
the subject of his optional study, the name of such subject 
^hall be specially mentioned on his graduation diploma. 



IV. By-Laws relating to the Regulations for 

Examinations. 

1. Examinations shall be held from the 15th to the 
30th day of June in every year. 

2. Time tables for examinations shall be drawn up at 
^he office of the College and be announced on or before the 
jth of June. 



70 COLLEGE OF LAW. 

3* The time tables shall not be changed, unless the 
permission of the Director of the College of Law is obtained. 

4. Examinations for optional studies shall be held 
from the ist to the 15th day of June. 

5. Students wishing to undergo examinations shall 
enter their names in the record book of candidates for 
examinations, kept at the office, on or before the 3i8t day 
of May. 

6. Students wishing to undergo examination in any 
optional study shall present to the Director of the College 
of Law as well as to the Director of the College, to which 
their optional study belongs, a written statement of their 
wish, with the authorization of the Professor in charge of 
such examination. 

7. Members of the Examining Committee shall be 
determined upon and appointed at the Faculty meeting itv 
May. 

8. The Examining Committee shall meet before the^ 
5th day of June for conference as to the subjects and 
methods for examinations and report to the Director of the 
College of Law the result of such conference. 

9. Two members of the examining committee must 
be present at the oral examinations. 

10. No student who absents himself from any ex- 
amination shall be allowed, under any circumstances, to 
undergo a further examination in the same examination 

session. 

11. Professors shall report to the Director of the 
College of Law the results of examinations under their 
charge within one week from the day on which the re- 
spective examinations are conducted. In case a Professor 
is unable, owing to the large number of candidates, to make 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 7 1 

up and send in his report within the above mentioned time, 
he must apply to the Director of the College of Law for an 
extension of the time, stating definitely how long he will 
require for finishing such report. 

12. The Director of the College of Law shall submit 
to the Faculty meeting all the examination reports of Pro- 
fessors. 

13. At the end of each academic year, lists of students 
showing their average marks shall be announced. 

14. The standing of students shall be determined by 
their average marks obtained in examinations, but in case 
a student shall have been absent from any examination, 
his standing shall be determined by his average mark 
obtained in the previous examinations. 

15. The standing of graduates shall be determined 
by their general average marks obtained in the graduation 
examinations. 

16. In case a student whose name has been entered 
in the record-book of candidates for examinations is unable 
to attend examinations on account of sickness or any other 
circumstances, he shall notify the fact previously to the 
Director of the College of Law. 

17. Seats in the examination room, and the order in 
which students will be called on in oral examinations shall 
be determined by lot. 

18. During the time of examinations, no students 
shall be allowed to go out of the examination room with- 
out the permission of the Professor in charge. 

19. Students may not bring any thing, except pen 
and ink, into the examination room without the permission 
of the Professor. 



72 GOLLBGB OF LAW. 

20. Students will be furnished by the office of the 
College with paper for their use in examinations. 

21. On the expiration of the time assigned for each 
examinatioHi candidates must hand over to the Professor 
their written answers, even if unfinished. 



> 



r:] 



Xn. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 
I. Officers. 



Director. 

GBNTATSU HAMADA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Profestor. 

Professors. 

ERWIN BAELZ, Geheimer Hofrath, M.D. (Leipzig), Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of the Imperial Universit;*. Medicim. 
JULIUS SCRIBA, Prof., M.D. (Heidelberg). Surgery. 
KAZUYOSHI TAGUCHI. Igakuhakushi. Anatomy. 
KENJI OSAWA, Igakuhakushi, M. D. (Strassburg University). 

Physiology. 
HOGARA UNO, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. 

Surgery, Dermatology and Syphilis. 
MASANORI OGATA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Hygiene. 

YOSHIKIYO KOGANEI, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Anatomy. 

JUNTARO TAKAHASHI, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Pharmacology. 
HAJIME SAKAKI, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Psychiatry. 

MORIJI MIURA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, M. D. (Berlin University). 

Pathology and Pathological Anatomy. 
JUNICHIRO SHIMOYAMA, Seiyakushi, Ph. D. (Strassburg Univer- 
sity). Pharmacy. 
KEIZO TAMBA, Seiyakushi, Ph. D. (Eriangen University). Pharmacy. 
TANEMICHI AOYAMA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Medicine. 
SANKICHI SATO, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi, Surgery. 
GBNTATSU HAMADA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. 

Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 
KUNIYOSHI KATAYAMA. Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. 

Forensic Medicine. 
JIUJIRO KOMOTO, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Ophthalmology. 



74 COLLEGE OF LAW. 

TSUKASA HIROTA.'igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Paediatrics. 

MUNEO KUMAGAWA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Medical Chemistry, 
NAGAYOSHI NAGAI. Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Berlin University). 

Pharmacy. 
KATSUSA13UR0 YAMAGIWA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. 

Pathology and Pathological Anatomy. 
KINNOSUKE MIURA, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Medicine. 

Assistant Professors. 

TOKICHIRO NIWA, Seiyakushi. Pharmacy. 

TASUKU KONO, Igakushi. Ophthalmology. 

JIRO TSUBOI, Igakushi, Igakuhakushi. Hygiene. 

YANAMATSU OKAMOTO, Igakushi. Forensic Medicine, 
NENJIRO CHIBA, Igakushi. Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 

TATSUKICHI IRISAWA, Igakushi. Medicine, 

SHIUZO KURE, Igakushi. Psychiatry. 



II. Courses of Instruction. 

The courses established in this College are as follows : — 

1. Medicine. 

2. Pharmacy. 

The course of Medicine extends over four years and is 
divided into four classes. The course of Pharmacy ex- 
tends over three years and is divided into three classes. 

MEDICINE. 
First Year. 

Hours per week, 
lat Term, and Term. 3rd Term, 

Anatomy 12 6 6 

Anatomy (practical) • — 12 — 

Histology 2 2 — 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



75 



Histology (practical) — — y 

Physiology 6 6 6 

General Pathology — — ^ 

Pathological Anatomy (practical) Occasionally. — 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
28t Term. 200 Term. 3rd Term. 

Anatomy (practical) I2 — — 

(Viviparity) — 2 2 

Topographical Anatomy ; 22 — 

Pharmacology 3 3 3 

Pharmacology (practical) — — (6) 

Medical Chemistry (practical) — (6) (6) 

Materia Medica — 2 — 

General Pathology 2 — — 

Pathological Anatomy 46 — 

Pathological Anatomy (practical) Occasieually. — 

Pathological H istology (practical) — 4 4 

Diagnosis — 2 2 

General Surgery 2 2 2 

Gynaecology — — 6 

Ophthalmology — — a 

Special Medicine 3 3 3 

Special Surgery 2 2 j 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term, 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Topographical Anatomy 22 — 

Special Medicine 3 3 3 

Clinical Medicine 444 

Out-patient Dispensary (medical) 6 6 6 

Special Surgery 223 



yS COLLEGE OP MEDICINE. 

Clinical Surgery 6 6 6 

Out-patient Dispensary (surgical) 6 6 6 

Bandaging (practical) — — (4) 

Obstetrics 5 — — 

Practice on the Mannikin (phantom)... — 6 — 

Ophthalmology x — 2 

Hygiene — 2 2 

Forensic Medicine — 2 2 

Fourth Year. 

Hours per week. 

X8t Term. 2nd Terra. 3rd Term* 

Clinical Medicine 444 

Out-patient Dispensary (medical) 6 6 6 

Clinical Surgery 6 6 6 

Out-patient Dispensary (surgical) 4 4 4 

Demonstrations in Surgery (practical) — — 3 

Clinical Gynaecology and Obstetrics ... i i i 
Out-patient Dispensary (gynaecological 

and obstetrical) (6) (6) (6) 

Ophthalmology i — — 

Clinical Ophthalmology i i i 

Out-patient Dispensary (ophthalmolo- 

gical) 6 . 6 

Practice in Ophthalmoscope (6) — — 

Dermatology and Syphilis and Clinical 

Dermatology and Clinical Syphilis. 222 

Psychiatry and Clinical Psychiatry 222 

Hygiene 2 — — 

Bacteriology — — (4) 

Forensic Medicine 2 — — 

Clinical Paediatrics ; 11 i 

Out-patient Dispensary (psediatrical)... (6) (6) (6) 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE* 'J^ 

N.B. The hours in brackets show that, the class being 
subdivided, the students are to attend alternately the 
subjects to which the bracketed hours are attached. 
Though students are required to attend those subjects 
in brackets, they are not examined in them at the end 
of the year. 

PHARMACY. 
First Year. 

Hours per week. 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 3 3 3 

Medical Botany 222 

Botanical Anatomy 21 — 

Analysis (practical) 35 — — 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (practical) — 30 30 

Botany (practical) and Microscopy ... — 5 5 

Second Year. 

Pharmacography 444 

Forensic Chemistry 3 2 — 

Sanitary Chemistry , — 2 4 

Analysis of Plants 12 — — 

Pharmacography (practical) 5 34 34 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (practical).. 18 — — 

Third Year. 

Organic Chemistry 2 2 — 

Dispensing 2 — — 

Forensic Chemistry (practical) 20 — — 

Sanitary Chemistry (practical) — 20 — 



78 COLLEGE OP MEDICINE. 

Dispensing (practical) 18 20 — 

Practice in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia — — 42 

Graduating Thesis 



in. Regolationa for Oradnation Examinations. 

Students who have passed the fourth year examina- 
tion in Medicine or the third year examination in Pharmacy 
must undergo the graduation examinations. 

REGULATIONS FOR GRADUATION 
EXAMINATIONS IN MEDICINE. 

1. The Graduation Examinations for students of the 

graduating class in the course of Medicine in the College 

of Medicine are held in accordance with the following 

regulations : — 

Examiners. 

2. Examiners are appointed from amongst the Pro- 
fessors of th€ College. 

Examination Term. 

3. The Graduation Examinations begin in the month 
of September in each year, and end in the following 
March, and candidates for examination must send in their 
applications to the Director of the College, not later than 
the last day of August. The days for examination on each 
subject are announced previously. 

Subjects of Examination. 

4. The subjects of examination are divided into three 
sections : — 



COLLEGE OF MEDlClNC. 79 

I. Anatomical and Physiological, 
II. Surgical and Ophthalmological, 
III. Medical and Obstetrical. 
Candidates are not allowed to undergo examina- 
tions in the second or third section, unless they have 
been examined in the first section. 

5. Section I. The Anatomical and Physiological 
Examinations are divided into three parts : — 

A. Anatomy (Anatomy, Histology, Topogra- 
phical Anatomy,) 
J3. Physiology, 
C. Pathological Anatomy. 
The examinations in this section continue for a period 
of three working days, Sundays and Holidays being ex- 
cepted, and this period is divided into four terms. The 
first two terms are devoted to Anatomy and the last two to 
Physiology and Pathological Anatomy. In each term, not 
more than eight candidates are examined at one time. 
A . — Anatomy. 

(a). In the first term, each candidate must take up 
certain questions on Osteology and Spranchnology which 
fall to him by lot, and give full explanations of the speci- 
mens laid before him. 

(6). In the second term, each candidate must take 
up certain questions on Histology which fall to him by 
lot, and answer such questions, using the microscope to 
explain the specimens laid before him. 
B.-— Physiology. 

In the examination in Physiology, each candidate is 
required to answer the questions which have fallen to him 
by lot. 

C. — Pathological Anatomy. 



8o COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

(a). Each candidate is examined in the practical 
autopsy of one cavity and is required to give explanations 
of some specimens, making use, if necessary, of the micros- 
cope. 

(6). Each candidate must take up some questions on 
Pathology and Pathological Anatomy assigned to him by 
lot, and give answers to them with full explanations. 

The Examiners select questions on the above subjects 
at the beginning of each term. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule are 
given by the Examiners to candidates who have passed 
successfully the examinations in Anatomy and Physiology. 

Schedule. 

To Mr 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the graduation examinations in Anatomy and 

Physiology held for days, from to with 

the following result, 

Marks. 

Osteology and Spranchnology 

Histology 

Physiology , 

Pathological Anatomy 

Total 

(Signed) 



Examiners. 
College of Medicine. 
(Date.) 



COLhUGB OF MBDICIMB. 8l 

NiB. — A candidate having obtained this certificate 
must immediately report himself to the Director of the 
College and present the certificate to the Examiners of 
the: section next in order, within three days from the date 
of this certificate. 

6. Section II. — The Surgical and Ophthalmotogical 
Examinations are divided into three parts : 

A. Surgery (Surgery, Dermatology and Syphilis) 

B. Ophthalmology. 

C. Pharmacology. 

The examinations in this section continue for a period 
of twelve working days, Sundays and Holidays being ex- 
cepted, and this period is divided into four terms. The 
first two terms are devoted to Surgery and the last two to 
Ophthalmology and Pharmacology. In each term not 
more than four candidates are examined at one time. 

A, — The examinations in Surgery are (a) Clinical and 
(b) Theoretical. 

(ci) In the clinical examinations, each candidate is 
required to treat one or two patients during a period of 
one week. During the first and second days of the ex- 
amination term, each candidate must examine one of the 
surgical cases in the wards, and give explanations before 
the Examiners regarding its cause, diagnosis, prognosis 
and treatment, and he must record these explanations in a 
journal for presentation on the following morning. During 
the succeeding six days, he is required to attend the patient 
in his charge in company with Examiners and describe in 
a journal the details of the patient's case. At the close of 
one week from the beginning of the examination term, he 
must present to the Examiners a complete clinical journal, 
accompanied by his own epicrisis on the same. 



8i2 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

During the whole term of examination, candidates are 
also required to attend all the clinical lectures held by one 
of the Examiners, and to accompany him in his visits to 
the wards. This will afford the Examiners frequent op- 
portunities of testing the efficiency of candidates, as each 
candidate is liable to be called upon by them to examine 
any of the surgical cases in the wards. 

{b) A theoretical examination is held in the same 
week as the clinical examination, its term being specially 
fixed. Each candidate must answer one question, as- 
signed to him by lot, on general, and another question on 
special, surgery. 
B» — Ophthalmology. 

Candidates are examined on some ophthalmological 
cases. 

C. — Pharmacology. 

Candidates are required to answer the questions al- 
lottted to them and to write a few prescriptions. 

The Examiners select questions on the above subjects 
at the beginning of each term. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule are 
given by the Examiners to candidates who have passed 
successfully the examinations in Surgery and Ophthal- 
mology. 

Schedule. 

To Mr 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the graduation examinations in Surgery and OphthaU 

mology held for days^ from to 

with the following result, 

Marks. 
Clinical Surgery 



COLLEGE OF ^:£DICIN£• 83 



/ 



Theoretical Surgery 

Ophthalmology 

Pharmacology 

Total 

(Signed) 



Examiners. 
College of Medicine. 
(Date.) 
N.B, — See the terms of the schedule contained in the 
foregoing Article. 

7. Section III, — The Medical and Obstetrical Exami- 
nations are divided into two parts : — 

A. Internal Medicine, (Internal Medicine, Pae* 

diatrics). 

B, Obstetrics, Gynaecology. 

The examinations in this section continue during a 
period of ten working days, Sundays and Holidays being: 
excepted, and this period is divided into three terms. The 
first two terms are devoted to Medicine and the last term 
to Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 

In each term, not more than four candidates are ex* 
amined at one time. 

A. — The examinations in Internal Medicine are divided 
into (a) Clinical and (6) Theoretical. 

(a) In the Clinical examinations, candidates are re* 
quired to treat one or two patients during a period of one 
iveek. On the first and second days, of the examination 
term, each candidate must examine one medical case, and 
offer explanations of its cause, diagnosis, prognosis and 
treatment, in presence of the Examiners, and he must 



84 COLLBGB OP IfBDICINB. 

record these explanations in a journal for presentation on 
the following morning. During the succeeding six days 
he must attend the patient in his charge, in company with 
the Examiners, and describe the details of the patient's 
case in his journal. At the close of one week from the 
beginning of the examination term, he must present to the 
Examiners a complete clinical journal accompanied by his 
own epicrisis on the same. 

During the whole examination term, candidates are 
required to attend all the clinical lectures held by one of 
the examiners, and to accompany him in his visits to the 
wards. This will afford the Examiners frequent opportu- 
nities of testing the efficiency of candidates, as q;ach candi- 
date is liable to be called upon by them to examine any of 
the medical cases in the wards. 

(b) The theoretical examination shall be held in the 
same week as the clinical examination, the time for it being 
specially arranged, and each candidate is required to answer 
the questions on special patholog}' which have fallen to hrm 
by lot. 

B, — The examination in Obstetrics and Gynaecology 
is principally of a clinical nature. Candidates are exa- 
mined in cases of confinement, the labouring or puerperal 
state, or in some gynaecological cases and on the obste- 
trical phantom. Candidates may be required to answer 
the questions on the theory of these subjects which have 
fallen to them, by lot. 

The Examiners select questions on the above subjects 
at the beginning of each term. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule are given 
by the Examiners to candidates who have successfully 
passed the examinations in Medicine and Obstetrics. 



COLLBGB OF MEDICINE. 85 

Schedule. 

To Mr 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the examinations in Medicine and Obstetrics held 

Jor days^ from to , with 

Jh4 following results 

Marks. 

Clinical Medicine 

Theoretical Medicine 

Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

Total 

(Signed) 



Examiners. 
College of Medicine, 
(Date.) 

N»B. — Those who have successfully passed the ex- 
aminations must present to the Director of the College the 
cerificates given by the Examiners. 

Results of Examinations. 

8. The results of examinations both clinical and 
theoretical in each subject shall be determined by marks 
j^iven for that subject on the scale of loo. 

9. The result of an examination in one section shall 
be determitied by the average marks of all the subjects in 
that aection. 

10. The position of a candidate shall be determined 



S6 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

by the average marks obtained in the three sections, viz.f. 
A. — Anatomy and Physiology, B. — Surgery and Oph- 
thalmology, and C. — Medicine and Obstetrics. 

Re-Examination. 

11. Candidates who have obtained the average mark- 
below 60 at the examinations of any one section shall be 
degraded, and those who have failed at the examinations of 
one section shall be examined on all the subjects of that 
section during the examination sessions of the following 
year. Those who have obtained the mark below 50 in any 
one subject or below 60-51 in more than two subjects of 
one section shall be degraded, though their average mark in 
that section be 60 or over. 

12. A candidate who has failed in the examinations- 
for the third time is thereby debarred from presenting^ 
himself at future examinations. 

. Withdrawal of the Application for Examinations. 

13. Any candidate who considers himself unable to 
attend the examinations of the current term, by reason of 
some cause which has begun to operate since the date of 
his application,- must inform the Director of the circumst- 
ance as early as possible. If any student fails more than 
twice to undergo the examinations in the proper terms, he 
may be dismissed by the 'Director from the College. 

Inability to attend Examinations. 

14. Candidates who are unable to attend examinatinsr 
on the fixed days by reason of sickness or some other 



COLLEGE OK MEDICINE. 87 

cause, must immediately report the circumstance to the 
Director. Medical certificates have to be presented in case 
of sickness, and in case of any other cause, the particulars 
are to be reported in writing. Such candidates may be 
specially examined later on in the same term, if the reasons 
for absence are considered satisfactory ; but should the 
term be already over, they shall be examined on all the 
subjects in that section, in which they are examined, in 
the examination term of the following year. 

V 

REGULATIONS FOR GRADUATION EXAMINA- 
TIONS IN PHARMACY. 

I. The Examinations for students of the graduating 
class in the course of Pharmacy in the College of Medicine 
are held in accordance with the following regulations : — 

Examiners. 

2. Examiners are appointed from amongst the Pro- 
fessors and Assistant- professors of the College. 

Examination Term. 

3. The Graduation Examinations begin on the ist 
of June in each year, and end on the 31st of October. 

The days for examination on each subject are an* 
nounced previously. 

Thesis. 

4. Candidates who desire to undergo the examina- 
tions must present theses containing the results of original 
investigation to the Director of the College, through the 
Examiners, not later than the 31st of May in each year. 



86 collbgr of mbdicine. 

System of Examinations. 

5. The whole examinations are divided into three 
sections : — 

I. Written Examination. 
II. Practical ,, 
III. Oral 
Candidates are required to undergo examinations in 
the order of the sections as ahove mentioned. 

6. The Written and Practical Examinations are set 
by a- single Professor or Assistant- professor who* has charge 
of this department of instruction and the Oral Examination 
by the whole of the Examiners. 

In each term not more than five candidates can be 
examined at one time. 

Examination Questions. 

7. The questions for Written and. Practical Exami- 
nations are generally determined by. lot. 

Written Examinations. 

8. The Written Examinations occupy not more than 
one week from the first day of the Examination, Sundays 
and Holidays being excepted. 

The questions for the written Examinations are selected 
from the following subjects : — 

I. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
II. Pharmacography. 
III. Dispensing. 
In the above subjects each candidate is required to 
answer in writing four questions in Pharmaceutical Che- 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



89 



mistry and Pharmacography and two questions in Dispens- 
ing. 

Half an hour is allowed for answenng one question in 
each subject. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule are 
given by the Examiners to candidates- who have passed 
successfully the Written Examination. 

Schedttle. 

ToMr 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the written examination held for days^ 

from to with the following result, 

Marks. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Pharmacography 

Dispensing •. 

Total 

(Signed) 



Examiners. 



College op Medicine. 
(Date.) 



Practical Examination. 

9. The Practical Examination occupies not more 
than three weeks. 

In the Practical Exannnations, questions are set in 
the following subjects :•— 



go COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

I. Analysis, 

II. Japanese Pharmacopceia, 

III. Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Practical), 

IV. Dispensing (Practical), 

V. Forensic Chemistry (Practical), 
VI. Sanitary Chemistry (Practical). 

In the Japanese Pharmacopoeia and Forensic Chemi- 
stry, among the subjects of the above practical Examina- 
tions, two medicines selected by the Examiners are sub- 
mitted to each candidate who is required to experiment 
upon the constituents, and to make out, if necessary, a 
table of the respective quantities of these constituents. 

In Sanitary Chemistry an experiment is set to each 
candidate. 

In Pharmaceutical Chemistry (practical) two kind of 
medicaments are given to each candidate who is required to 
prepare the same. 

In Analysis, two medicines are given to each can- 
didate who is required to experiment upon the constituents. 

In Dispensing (practical) each candidate is required 
to dispense the prepared medicines stated in the three 
questions. 

In the Practical Examination a candidate cannot de- 
mand more than three articles to be supplied for the 
examination in any one subject. 

Candidates must display minute accuracy in writing 
out the formulae and results in the Practical Examination 
which they present to the Examiners. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule are 
given by the Examiners to candidates who have passed 
successfully in the Practical Examination. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. QI 

Schedule. 

To Mr 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the Practical Examination held for days^ 

from to with the following 

result, 

Marks. 

Analysis 

Japanese Pharmacopoeia 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Practical) 

D ispensing (Practical) 

Forensic Chemistry (Practical) 

Sanitary Chemistry (Practical) 

Total 

(Signed) 



Examiners. 



' College of Medicine. 
(Date.) 



Oral Examination. 

lo. The Oral Examination occupies not more than 
two days. 

In the Oral Examinations, questions are set in the 
following subjects : — 

I. Pharmacography, 
II. Medical Botany, 
III. Organic Chemistry, 



g2 COLLBQE OP MBDICINE. 

IV, Forensic Chemistry, 
V. Sanitary Chemistry. 

In Pharmacography candidates are required to give 
the names, characters, applications, etc., of the articles of 
xnateria medica, whereof more than ten are submitted to 
them by the Examiners. 

In Medical Botany candidates are required to name 
and describe the fresh plants and botanical preparations, 
whereof more than ten are submitted to them by the 
Examiners. 

In Organic Chemistry candidates are required to state 
the chemical composition of organic bodies, and class them 
according to their applications, and also to describe the 
preparation of organic medicines which have been recently 

introduced. 

In Forensic Chemistry candidates are required to an* 
swer questions on the examination of suspected matter 
for poisons— blood-stains, etc. 

In Sanitary Chemistry candidates are lequired to an- 
swer questions on the examination of air, water, soil, &c., 
for sanitary purposes, and on the inspection of foods. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule are 
given by the Examiners to candidates who have passed 
successfully in the Oral Examination. 

Schedule. 

To Mr 

Xhis is to certify that the said Mr, has^ 

passed the Oral Examinations held for 

days, from. to v^ith the following 

^^sult. 



COLLEGE OF MBDICINB, 93 

Marks. 

Pharmacography 

Medical Botany 

Organic Chemistry 

Sanitary Chemistry Forensic Chemistry 

Total 

(Signed) 



Examiners. 
College of Medicine. 
(Date) 

N»B, — Any one who has obtained this certificate must 
immediately report himself to the Director of the College. 

Results of Examinatons. 

11. The result of the examinations in each subject 
shall be determined by the> marks given for that subject on 
the scale of loo. 

12. The results of examinations in one section shall 
be determined by the average marks of all the subjects in 
that section. 

13. The whole result of the graduation examinations 
shall be determined by the general average marks in all 
sections. 

Re- Examination. 

14. Those who have obtained a mark below 50 in any 
one subject of the Oral, Written or Practical Examinations 
shall be degraded, and they shall be examined on all the 
subjects of that section in the next examination term. 



94 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

15. A candidate who has failed thrice in the exami- 
nations is thereby debarred from presenting himself at any 
future examination. 



Withdrawal of the Application for Examinations. 

16. Any candidate who considers himself unable to 
attend the examinations of the current term, by reason of 
some cause which has begun to operate since the date of his 
application, must without delay inform the Director of the 
College of the circumstance. If any student fails more 
than twice to undergo the examinations in the proper termis, 
he may be dismissed by the Director from the College. 

Inability to attend Examinations. 

17. Candidates who are unable to attend examina- 
tions on the fixed days by reason of sickness or some other 
cause, must immediately report the circumstance to the 
Director. Medical certificates must be presented in case 
of sickness, and in case of any other cause, the particulars 
must be reported in writing. Such candidates may be 
specially examined later on in the same term» if the reasons 
for absence are considered satisfactory ; but should the 
term be already over, they shall be examined in the 
examination term of the following year on all the subjects 
of that section, even any subject of which has been 
examined. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 95 

IV. By-lav^s to the Regalations for Elective 
and Post Graduate Students. 

By-laws to the Regulations for Elective and Post- 
graduate Students in the College of Medicine have been 
established as follows : — 

BY-LAWS TO THE REGULATIONS FOR 
ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 

I. — Elective students shall, in all matters, comply with 
the orders of the Professors of the courses of studies which 
they pursue. 

2. — At the close of the first year, after his admission to 
the elective course, each elective student must present to 
the Professor in charge a written statement of the studies 
which he has pursued during that period. 

3. — If an elective student desires to continue his stud- 
ies after he has finished one year*s study, he must apply 
for permission to the Director of the College. 

4. — Elective students are prohibited, except by special 
permission of the Professors in charge, from treating pa- 
tients or from using any of the instruments, medicaments, 
and the like. 

BY-LAWS TO THE REGULATIONS FOR 
POST GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

I. — Post-graduate students must in all matters comply 
with the orders of the Professors of the courses of studies 
which they pursue. 

2. — Post-graduate students who make investigations 
in the Hospital may be required to discharge the duties of 



q6 

COLLBGB OF MEDrClNB, 

h.K-.^r^" ""^ '^osP'tal. post-graduate students are oro- 
like, w.th the object of treating the patients. 



V. Course of State Medicine. 

CollL'ZT^u^ '*'? "'"^'''''' "^^ '^^" °^S«"-«d in the 
college and the regulations are as follows :_ 

Regulations of the Course of State Medicine. 
I—The subjects of the course are as follows:- 

Forensic Medicine l^ 

Psychiatry 

National and Public Heai'th'Legisla- 

t>on for Medicine 

2.--The term extends over four months." 

and less tlZ, ""'"'T °^ '^"^'^^"^^ «hall be more than 20 
«na less than 50 each term. 

one of the following categories :_ 

IchoT °^*'^« Medical Section of a Higher 
School or a late Higher Middle School ; 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 97 

Graduates of the late Special Course of the Colleg^e 

of Medicine ; 
Graduates of the late Class A. Medical Schools or 
such as possess proficiency equal to any of the 
ahove. 
5. — The fee (twelve yen) for attendance must be paid 
in advance and will not in any case be returned to a stu» 
dent even though he may have attended only a fraction oi 
the course. 

6. — Two months beforehand, notice is given to those, 
who have entered their name for the course, of the day 
fixed for assembling. 



There are laboratories in the College for prosecuting 
investigation in the following subjects : — 

1. Anatomy. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Pathology. 

* 

4. Pharmacology. 

5. Hygiene. 

6. Forensic Medicine. 

7. Pharmacy. 

These laboratories are provided with everything neces- 
sary for demonstration and research. 

VI. Hospitals of the College of Medicine- 
There are two hospitals: the First Hospital, situated in 
the University grounds, and the Second Hospital, situated 
at Izumicho, Kandaku, which admit such patients as may 



98 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



be deemed instructive cases in medical and surgical prac- 
tice and investigation. 

They contain laboratories for carrying out researches 
upon subjects relating to the sciences of medicine and sur- 
gery. For clinical lectures on Psychiatry, subjects are fur- 
nished by patients in the Sugamo Hospital of the Tokyo Fu. 

The First Hospital has seven wards containing one 
ihundred and nineteen rooms, and is provided with three 
hundred and eighteen beds in all ; two hundred and twenty 
six being for free patients and ninety two for ordinary 
patients (those who have to pay their own expenses at the 
Hospital). 



THE FOLLOWING TABLE SHOWS THE NUMBER 
OF BEDS PROVIDED IN EACH WARD. 



Wards for various Cases. 


>ree 
Patients. 


Ordinary 
Patients. 


TotaL 


Wards for Medloal Cseas. 
„ „ Surgioal Cases. 


77 
67 


S6 

IS 


/U Infectious aid> 
108 ( Contagious case s 

^Included. ^ 
72 


n It GynfiAOoloRical 
and Obstetrioal 
Cases. 


84 


15 


49 


** n Ophthalmologlo- 
al Cases. 


12 


13 


2) 


,• „ Dermntologfoal 
and Syphiliilo 
Coses. 


10 


6 


15 


„ H Cakke Oases. 


15 


14 


29 


«, „ Paediafcrloal 
Cases. 


SI 


4 


25 


Total 


SW 


9i 


318. 











The Second Hospital has two wards containing forty 
six rooms, and is provided with one hundred and fifteen 
beds in all ; one handred and two being for free patients and 
thirteen for ordinary patients. 



•COLLEGE "OF MBDCINB. 



99 



THE FOLLOWING TABLE SHOWS THE NUMBER 
OF BEDS IN EACH WARD. 



Wards for varioos Oaaes. 


PreB , Orrtlnary 
PatientR. ' Patients. 


Total. 


Ward for Medloal OasM. 
„ „ Sargioul Oases. 

• 


66 
40 


6 

8 '' 

• 


/8 Inierttoas and\ 
61.1 OontnRtons cases] . 

\ iiiolurled. / 
64 

• 


Total. 


1<X 


18 


iir> 



Out-patients are treated according to the following 
regulations : — 

Medical, surgical, and paediatrical cases, daily, 

Gynsecological and obstetrical cases, every second day, 
ih the First Hospital, — Sundays, holidays, Tuesday^ (For 
medical cases), and Thursdays (for surgical cases), excepted. 
Up to the end of March, 1896, the admittances to the 
^Hospital were chiefly of ordinary patients,-^that is, 
patients who pay their own expenses ; and the number of 
free patients was inconsiderable. But, in April of thb 
same year, the regulations were so amended as to admit to 
the Hospital for free treatment any poor patientis whose 
cases might prove of interest, either in relation to clinical 
-instruction or medical investigation. Any of these, however, 
-who do not wish to be treated as free patients, can be 
admitted as ordinary patients. For ordinary patients, there 
:are three scales of charges, according to class of accom- 
modation, including room and food. 

For scientific investigations into the nature of^^kakkCf'* 
an endemic disease peculiar to this country, a special ward 
connected with the First Hospital is open yearly from 
April ist to November 30th, during which time this malady 
is most prevalent. In this ward a certain number of beds 
are provided and out-patients are also treated every other 



XOO COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

day ; and provision is made for the admission of a certain 
number of free patients. 

At the request of the T6ky6-Fu, the chief physician 
and ordinary physicians are sent from the College to treat 
patients in the Sugamo Hospital of the Tokyo- £u. As 
excellent opportunities are thus furnished, clinical lectures 
on Psychiatry are given at the Hospital. The Hospital 
containing more than three hundred and fifty beds, abundant 
materials are supplied from the great variety of cases. 

At the request of the Tokyo-Shi- Sanji^Kwai, the chief 
physician and ordinary physicians are /sent. to give their 
services at the Yoikuin. When rare diatheses are shown 
by any of the patients, such patients are admitted free to 
the First Hospital, as presenting cases for the instruction 
of the students, and furnishing subjects for clinical lectures. 

A course of midwifeiy instruction (Sanba-Y6sei-Jo) 
extending over ten months has been established in the 
Gynaecological lecture-room in the First Hospital, and 
the Professor and Assistant-professor of Gynecology have 
been appointed to undertake the teaching with the object of 
trainning competent midwives. 

A course of instruction for hospital nurses (Kanbyo- 
Hd-Kdshu-Kwa), extending over one year, has been esta- 
blished in the First Hospital for those who desire to be- 
come nurses of the same hospital. Those who are not in 
the hospital are also admitted to the course. 



Xm. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

I. Officers- 



Director. 

KAUY FOUROUITSI, KOgakuhakushi, Ingenieur des arts et tnanufac 
tures» Licencies es sciences, Professor, 

m 

Professors. 

CHARLES DICKINSON WEST, M.A., C.E. (Dublin University) M.I 
Mech. E. (London). Mechanical Engineering, 

TOYOKICHI TAKAMATSU, Rigakushi, KOgakuhakushi, F.C.S. (Lon- 
don) M.S. C.I. (London). ' Applied Chemistry 

SHINROKURO MIYOSHI, KOgakushi, KOgakuhakushi. 

' ' - • Naval Architecture^ 

KINGO TATSUNO, KOgakushi, KOgakuhakushi. Architecture. 

KAUY FOUROUITSl, KOgakuhakushi, Ing6nieur des arts et manufac- 
tures, Licenci^ es sciences. 

rWATA NAKAZAWA, Rigakushi, KOgakuhakushi. Applied Chemistry, 

WATARU AVATANABE. Rigakushi, KOgakuhakushi. 

Mining and Metallurgy 

BUNJI MANO, KOgakushi, KOgakuhakushi, M.I. Mech. E. (London) 

Mechanical Engineering 

HATSUNE NAKANO, KOgakushi, M\ Sc. (Cornell University). 
Foreign Memb. I.E.E. (London). Electrical Engineering 

TATSUTARO NAKAMURA) KOgakushi. Architecture,' 

NAKA MATOBA, KOgakushi. • Mining a»d Metallurgy^ 

K AOYA YAM ADA, Rigakushi. -^  ^ Mitring and Metallurgy J 

HISAK[ NOBECHI, KOgakushi. Civil Engineering. 

ARIYA INOKUCHI. KOgakushi. Strength of Materials and 

of Structures, and Mechanical Engineering. 

YEIJI NAKAJIMA, Rigakushi, Civil Engineerings 



Z02 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 



Assistant Professors. 



HIDESABURO NAKAYAMA, KOgakmhi. 
KEIKICHII I3HII, KOgakushi, 
SEIICHI TERANO, KOgakushi. 
JOKICHIRO YEMORI, KOgakushi. 
KOGORO WATANABE, KOgakushi. 
CHUZABURO SHIBA, KOgaflcbshi. 
SHIKAJIRO HATTORI, KOgakushi. 
TAKESHI KAMdl, KOgakushi. 
JISABURO YOKOBORI, KOgakushi. 



Civil Engineerings 

Architecture s 

Naval Architecture, 

Applied Chemistry, 

Electrical Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineering. 

Civil Engineering, 

Applied Chemiiiry, 

Mining and Metallurgy, 



Lecturers. 



ICHISUKE FUJIOKA, KOgakushi, KOgakuhakushi, Local Hon ► Sec 



Electrical Engineering, 

Civil Engineering. 

Architecture, 

Technology of Arms, 

Architecture. 

Mining Law,, 

Mathematics. 

Technology of Explosives, 



and Tr. LE.E. (London), 
YOSHITSUGU KURATA, Rigakushi. 
KIYOYOSHI KIGO. 
MORIYUKI AKIMOTO. 
HISASHI MATSUOKA. 
TSUNASHIRO WADA. 
KAN ICHIRO MIWA, Rigakushi. 
SHOKICHI MORI, KOgakushi. 

YETSUNOJO HpRI, Rigakushi, (F. C. 3. London). Organic Chemistry 

and Chemical History. 
BUNPACHIRp SHIMAGAWA. 
KAKUJIRO YAMAZAKI, HOgakushi. 
OSUKE ASANO, KOgakushi. 
TSURUTARO MATSUO, 
YEINOSUKE YAMAGUCHI, Rigakushi, 
RIOTA HARA, Rigakushi. 
OSCAR LOEW, PhvD. (Leipzig Uuiversity). 



Technology of Explosives. 

Industrial Economy. 

Electrical Engineering* 

Naval Architecture. 

Kinetics.^ 

Execution of Works. 

Applied Chemistry 



J 



COLLEGE OP ENGINEERING. I03 

IL Courses of Instruction . 

The followrng nine courses, each of which extends 
over three years, are established in this College : — 

1. Civil Engineering. 

2. Mechanical Engine^ritrg. 

3. Naval Architecture. 

4. Technology of Arms. 

5. Electrical Engineering. 

6. Architecture. 

7. Applied Chemistry. 

8. Technology of Explosives. 

9. Mining and Metallurgy. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
First Year. 

Hours per week, 

xst Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Terfn.r . 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Kinetics i i i 

Strengthof Materials and of Structures. 33 — 

Steam Engines i i i 

Mechanism i i i 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Geology 22 — 

Execution of Works 222 

Bridges — — 3 

Road-making — 3 — 

Surveying 3 — — 

Graphic Statics 5 5 5 

Field and Office Works and Drawing ..16 16 22 



i04 college op engineering. 

Second Year. 

Hours per week, 

xst Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 

Hydraulic Engineering 4 4 4 

Railways 22 2 

Bridges 3i 3 i 

Sanitary Engineering 3 3 3 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Geodesy — 2 2 

Seismology 2 — — 

Industrial Economy i i i 

Administrative Laws affecting Engi- 
neering Works — — 2 

Designs and Drawing 19 19 21 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 

xst Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Civil Engineering Excursion. ^ThSl* 

Hydraulic Engineering — 4 — 

Railways — 2 — 

Bridges — i — 

Designs and Drawing — . 28 — 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
First Year. 

Hours per week, 
xst Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Kinetics i i i 

Strength of Materials and of Struc- 
tures 3 3 •"" 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. I05 

Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Steam Engines 222 

Mechanism i i i 

Hydraulic Machinery — —r 2 

Workshop Appliances i^ ij i^ 

Graphic Statics 222 

Designs, Drawing and Practice 22 22 26 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mechanical Engineering 4 4 2 

Dynamos and Motors 2 2 — 

Mechanical and Metallurgical Tech- 
nology 22 — 

Hydraulic Machinery i i — 

Arms — I 2 

Industrial Economy i i i 

Designs, Drawing and Practice 25 25 30 



Third Year. 



.Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term 



Mechanical Engineering Excursion. Excursion. ^^*^|^Jj* 

Special extra Lectures — — i 



NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 
First Year. 



Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.- 



Mathematics ,. 3 3 — 



Xo6 COLLBGB OF ENGINEERING. 



Hours per week. 



pe 

ist Term, and Ter.n. 3rd Term. 

Kinetics i i i 

Strength of Materials and of Struc- 
tures 3 3 *~ 

Steam Engines 222 

Mechanism i i i 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Naval Architecture 3 3 5 

Graphic Statics » 222 

Naval Architecture Designs aud Draw- 
ing 18 18 20 

Marine Engine Designs and Drawing. 3 3 3 



Second Year. 

Hours per week, 

z St Term. ?.nd Term. 3rd Term 

Naval Architecture 6 6 6 

Marine Engines 3 . 3 3 

Hydraulic Machinery *.. i i — 

Workshop Appliances ij ij li 

Industrial Economy i i i 

Naval Architecture Designs and Draw- 
ing 21 21 21 

Marine Engine Designs and Drawing. 3 3 3 



Third Year. 



Hours per week, 
ist Term, snd Term. 3rd Term. 



Naval Architecture Excursions. 4^ 3 

Arms — I 2 

Naval Architecture Designs*and Draw- 
ing -^ 27 — 



CQI^IrEGB OF ENGINEEING. I07 

Hours per week. 
(• ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term* 



Marine Engine Designs and Drawing. — 
Designs and Thesis — 



TECHNOLOGY OF ARMS. 
First Year. 

Hours per week. 
1st Term, and Term. 3rd Term 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Kinetics i i i 

Strength of Materials and of Struc- 
tures 3 3 — 

Mechanism i i i 

Steam Engines 2 2 2 

Technology of Explosives 222 

Arms and their Constructions 322 

Gun Carriages and Limbers — 2 — 

Metallurgy of Iron 2 2 2 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Graphic Statics 2 2 2 

Chemical Laboratory 11 11 11 

Drawing 5 5 10 

Second Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term, and Term. 3rd Term.- 

Exterior ballistics 3 — — 

Pyrotechny — 2 — ^ 

Theory of Projectiles — — 2 

Strength of Guncarriage — — 2 



lo8 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

Hours per week, 
ist Temu 2nd Term, atd Term 

Dynamos and Motors 2 2 — 

Naval Architecture i i — 

Workshop Appliances i J i^ ij 

Mechanical and Metallurgical Techno- 
logy 222 

Hydraulic Machinery i i — 

Industrial Economy i i i 

Chemical Laboratory ..; 10 10 10 

Designs and Drawing 16 16 18 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 
xst Term. 2nd Term, aid Term. 

Technology of Arms Excursion. Thestis. 

Torpedoes — i — 

Special extra Lectures — 2 — 

Construction of Tables for Artillery 

Shooting — 2 — . 

Designs and Drawing — 32 — 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
First Year. 

Hours per week. 
1st Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Kinetics ". i i i 

Strength of Materials and of Struc- 
tures 3 3 — 

Steam Engines 2 22 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Mechanism i i i 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. I09 

Hours per week, 
xst Tenii. and Temi. 3nl Term. 

Electricity and Magnetism 222 

Telegraphy i i i 

Electric and Magnetic Measurements, i i i 

Mechanical Drawing 4 4 4 

Chemical Laboratory 6 6 — 

Electrical and Magnetical Laboratory. 12 Z2 22 



Second Year. 

Hours per week, 

xst Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Telephony '. i i i 

Electric Power 222 

Electric Lighting 2 2 2 

Dynamos and Motors 3 3 3 

Electric and Magnetic Measurements, i i i 

Mechanical Engineering i i — 

Hydraulic Machinery i i — 

Industrial Economy i i i 

Designs and Drawing 10 10 12 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory ...15 15 15 



Third Year. 



Hours per week. 



xst Term, and Term, srd Term. 
Practice, 
Electrical Engineering Excursions.^ Deigns ^Thesi s. 

Special extra Lectures — 1 — 



no COLLEGE OP ENGINEERING. 

ARCHITECTURE. 
First Year. 

Hours per week, 

xst Term, and Term. 3*<l Term. 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Steam Engines i i i ' 

Strength of Materials and of Struc- 
tures 3 3 — 

Surveying 3 — — 

Geology 1.. 2 2 — 

Stereotomy — i^ i^ 

Building Materials 2 — — 

Building Constructions 2 2 2 

History of Architecture ^i 3 3 

Dwelling Houses i — • — ^' 

Japanese Architecture — — 3 

Perspective i — — 

Freehand Drawing 4 4 4 ' 

Graphic Statics 2 2 2 

Practice in Surveying 4 — — 

Drawing and Perspective Practice .6 — — 

Designs and Drawing — 15 20 

r 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 

ist Term, and Term. 3rd Ter.-n. 

Sanitary Engineering 2 a- 2 ^ 

Decoration... ij — — .. 

Japanese Architecture 3 3 — 

Special Designing 3 li i^ 

Execution of Works — li 2 

Mechanical and Metallurgical Tech- 
nology 2 2 2 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERIING^ I I^I 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term 

Seismology 2 — — 

Freehand Drawing 4 4 4. 

Decorative Drawing 6 6 6 ' 

Designs and Drawing r--i3^ 18 .17 

Third Year. 

Hours per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Tenn< 

Architecture Excursion. — &^aSs. i 

Building Laws — ih — 

Decorative Drawing — 12 — 

^Esthetics 2 2 — 

Freehand Drawing ,. — 4 — 

Designs and Drawing — 16 — 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

• -I 

r 

First Year. 

Hours per week. 

I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Tenri. 

Mineralogy 2 2 — 

Steam Engines...; i i i 

Mechanism i i i 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Organic Chemistry 4 3 — 

Qulitative Analysis 2 1 21 — 

Quantitative Analysis — — 16 

Applied Chemistry ...: — 2 3 

Metallurgy — — 4 

Physical Laboratory 6 6 ■—""■■ 

Mechanical Drawing — — 8 ' 



xi2 college op engineering. 

Second Year. 

Hours per week, 

zst Term, aod Term. 3rd Tena* 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Applied Chemistry 7 7 7 

Technology of Explosives i i i 

Metallurgy 3 3 3 

Quantitative Analysis 20 20 — 

Technical Analysis — — 18 

Determination of Minerals i i — 

Blowpipe Analysis 2 2 — 

Mechanical Drawing — — 8 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 

xst Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 

Applied Chemistry 5 5 5 

History of Chemistry — — 2 

Assaying 8 8 — 

Mechanical and Metallurgical Tech- 
nology 222 

Applied Chemistry Laboratory 17 — — 

Designs and Drawing 6 — — 

Applied Chemistry — Thesis. Thesis. 



TECHNOLOGY OF EXPLOSIVES. 

First Year. 

Hours per week, 
zst Term, zod Term. 3rd Term. 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Kinetics i i i 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. IIJ 

HcurR per wedc. 
xst Tenn. srd Tenn. 31^ Tenn 

Mechanism i i i 

Steam Engines i i i 

Arms and their Constructions 322 

Technology of Explosives 2 2 2 

Organic Chemistry 4 3 — 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Graphic Statics 222 

Chemical Laboratory 12 12 12 

Practice and Drawing 7 9 13 



Second Year. 

Hcurs p?r wee!c. 

I St Term, and rcxtn. 3rd Term. 

Exterior Ballistics 3 — — 

Workshop Appliances....: ij li ij 

Theory of Projectiles — — 2 

Pyrotechny 2 — 

Technology of Explosives 2 2 — 

Applied Chemistry 222 

Dynamos und Motors 2 2 — 

Hydraulic Mechinery i i — 

Industrial Economy i i i 

Chemical Laboratory 18 18 22 

Practice and Drawing 6 6 8 



'f^ 



rpTiRD Year. 



Hours per week, 
rst Term. 2cd Tenn. 3rd Terau 



Technology of Explosives Excjrsions. — xhtsis. 

Torpedoes — i — 

Special extra Lecture — 4 — 



114 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERIG. 



Hours per week, 
zst Tenn. 2ad Tenii. jrd Term. 



Chemical History — — 2 

Designs and Drawing — 30 — 



MINING AND METALLURGY. 
First Year. 

Hcurs per week. 

Tst Term, and f erm. 3rd Tenn. 

Mining 444 

Mineralogy 2 2 — 

Metallurgy — 2 3 

Geology 22 — 

Steam Engines i i i 

Mechanism i i i 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Surveying 3 — — 

Determination of Minerals i i i 

Qualitative Analysis 12 12 12 

Drawing 8 8 13 

Second Year. 

Hcurs per week. 

I .St Term, and lerm. 3rd Term. 

Mine Survey , 2 2 — 

Metallurgy 3 3 3 

Metallurgy of Iron 2 2 2 

Dressing 2 2 2 

Hydraulic Machinery — — 2 

Determination of Minerals i i i 

Assaying 8 8 8 

Blowpipe Analysis 2 2 3 

Quantitative Analy 14 14 16 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. II5 



Third Year. 



Hours per Mreek. 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Terra. 

M i n i ng and Metallurgy Excursions — Thesis. 

Ore Deposits 22 — 

Mechanical and Metallurgical Techno- 

loi;y 222 

Mining Laws — 2 2 

Metallurgical Experiments — 7 — 

Engineering Practice — 3 — 

Mining Designing — 7 8 

Metallurgical Designing — 7 8 

Iron Metallurgical Designing — 7 8 



IIL Regalations for Examinations 

1. Examinations shall be held at the end of each term ; 
but should the instruction in any. subject be completed at 
an earlier time in the term, the examination on such 
subject may be held at the time of such completion. 

2. The term marks for the work done during each term 
shall be determined either by written examination, practical 
work, or by any other means the instructor may prefer. 

3. The year mark of a student in each subject shall 
be determined by the average of the term marks in that 
subject. In determinng a student's general average for 
the academic year, the year mark in each subject shall be 
multiplied by the coefficient appropriated to that subject 
according to its relative importance, and then the sum 
of the products shall be divided by the sum of the coef- 
ficients. 



Il6 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

4. Each Professor or Instructor shall report to the 
Director of the College of Engineering the results of the 
examinations at the completion of each examination. 

5. A student is said to have passed when his general 
average mark is above sixty and his year mark in every 
subject is above fifty. One who has not passed is required 
to attend, from the first term of the next year, all the 
classes to which he attended the previous year. 

6. A student who is absent from examinations may 
be specially examined afterward, if the cause of his absence 
is found reasonable upon inquiry, but a student who is 
absent from the 3rd term examination shall not be allowed 
the privilege of a special examination when his average 
mark in any subject for the previous terms is below 50. 

7. If the student, who has not passed examinations 
according to conditions of Article 5, fails again, he shall be 
-dismissed from the College. 



IV. By-Laws relating to the Regulations 
for Examinations* 

1. Examinations shall be held within two weeks 
from the end of each term, but for the third term they 
shall be commenced about the 15th of June. 

2. If any instructor has to conduct the examination 
in any subject at the time when the instruction in that 
subject is completed, or if he is obliged by any circumst- 
ances to conduct an examination before the examination 
session as mentioned in Article i, he shall obtain previously 
from the Director of the College permission to that effect. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. II7 

3. Time tables for examinations are to be so arranged 
as to allow of examinations at earlier dates for such large 
classes as are formed of various students of different classes, 
and shall be announced five days before the beginning of 
the examination session of each term. 

4. The coefficient of a subject referred to in Article 3 
of the Regulations for Examinations shall be determined 
by the Director of the College after the decision of the 
Faculty meeting. 

5. Instructors shall report to the Director of the 
College the results of examinations under their charge 
within one week from the day on which their respective 
examinations are conducted. In case any instructor is 
unable, owing to the large number of students, or for any 
other reasons, to make up and send in his report within 
the above mentioned time, he must apply to the Director of 
the College for permission to extend the time ; stating defi- 
nitely what further time will be required to finish such report. 

6. The Director of the College shall submit to the 
Faculty meeting all the reports of examinations after the 
examinations are all over. 

7. At the end of each academic year, lists of students 
showing their general average marks for the year shall be 
issued. 

8. The standing of students shall be determined by 
their general average marks and that of graduates by such 
average marks as are obtained by dividing by four the sum 
of their general average marks for the three academic years 
and the marks obtained for the graduating theses, while the 
standing of the first year students shall be determined by 
the Iroha order of their names, and that of a student who 
has suspended his attendance at the College or failed at 



1l8 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

examinations, by his general average mark of the previous 
year. 

9. If a student being absent from any term examina- 
tion desires to undergo a special examination, he shall 
nQtify his desire by taking such steps as the following : 

In case of his own sickness, a medical certificate of the 
Hospital of the College of Medicine bearing the date of his 
absence shall be produced. 

In case that the illness of any of his nearer relations 
necessitate his absence, a permission must be obtained 
previously by presenting a written statement testifyinj^ to 
that effect. 

In case he is temporarily called out by a provision of 
the Conscription Act, or that hs is required to stay in his 
.house by the Quarantine Regulations on account of a 
person in the same house with him being attacked by a 
contagious disease, and in any similar case, a certificate 
from the proper authority to such effect must be presented. 

10. In case the student being absent from the teim 
examination applies for a special examination, an investiga- 
tion as to the fact shall be made at the Faculty meeting, 
and the special examination will be held, if the case be 
proved reasonable and unavoidable. 

11. The student who desires to undergo a special 
examination must apply for it before the end of that term*, 
to which his absence refers, but after the end of such terra 
he shall be no longer entitled to do so. 

12. The permission for a special examination, once 
obtained by a student, shall be no longer effectual unles he 
presents himself at the special examination within two 
weeks from the beginning of the next term, or if he is absent 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. .II9 

from the third term examination, within two weeks fxDm 
the ist of September of the next academic year. 

13. The day and time for a special examination wiB 
bs communicated to the applicant from the office of the 
College, and if he does not present himself on the day so 
appointed, he shall not be allowed under any circumstances 
to apply again for such examination. 

14. During the time of examinations, no student shaS 
be allowed to go out from the examination room without 
the permission of the instructor in charge. 

15. Students may not bring anything into the exami- 
nation room without the permission of the instructor. 

16. Students will be furnished by the instructor with 
paper for their use at examinations. 

17. On the expiration of the time assigned for eacb 
examination, students must hand over to the instructor 
their written answers even if unfinished. 



V- Regulations relating to Practical Training and 
Directions for stadents undertaking practical 

work or excurisons- 



REGULATIONS RELATING TO THE 
PRACTICAL TRAINING. , 

I. The object of practical training is to give students 
knowledge for practical application of scientific principles, 
and for this purpose students shall be trained in practical 
^work or sent out to witness various establishments cr 
institutions of industry relating to their respective studies. 



X20 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

2. Practical work shall be done either at the College 
or outside. 

3. The period for practical work or excursion shall be 
fixed by the Director according to the opinion of the chief 
instructor in each course of study. 

4. Students at practical work shall be always guided 
by their respective instructors in charge of such work, or 
by the chief instructors in their respective courses. When 
students undertake by themselves any practical work out- 
side the College, or make an excursion, they shall be fur- 
nished beforehand with detailed instructions or guidance in 
writing. 

5. Details of each subject for practical work shall be 
drawn up by the chief instructor in each course. 

6. The chief instructor in each course shall be res- 
ponsible for the superintendence of students at practical 
work or during excursions, but sometimes the instructor in 
charge of the respective study or a superintendent specially 
appointed for the purpose shall be held responsible for it. 

7. Students undertaking practical work, or an excur- 
sion, shall make out a report of their work and submit it to- 
the instructor in charge, or to th(; chief instructor, within 
the time specified, but no such report shall be required of 
them if they go out along with the instructor. 

8. To test what has been done by the student a 
special examination may be held. 

DIRECTIONS FOR STUDENTS UNDERTAKING 
PRACTICAL WORK OR EXCURSIONS. 

I. Students shall obtain directions from the instructor 
in charge, or the chief instructor, from time to time for 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. . 121 

their work, bat when they undertake by themselves practical 

» 

work outside the College, or make an excursion, they must 
ask beforehand the chief instructor what is to be done 
during iheir work or excursion. 

2. Students undertaking practical work, or excursions, 
shall act under the supervision of the instructor in charge 
or of the special superintendent, and cautiously keep up 
their proper behaviour so as not to do any deed that may 
disgrace their honour as students of the University. 

3. Students shall report to the chief instructor all the 
details of their work within the time specified and also lay 
before him, sketches, note-books, &c. for his inspection. 

4. Students shall not while on a journey for practical 
work, or on an excursion, remain at any other place than 
the place of their destiny, but if a student is obliged to do 
so on account of sickness, or any other event not under his 
control, he shall obtain a medical certificate in case of 
sickness, or a certificate from the local office of city, town 
or village, and produce it upon his return. 

5. When students reach the place for their work, or 
thereafter change their station, they shall make known their 
address to the instructor in charge, or the special super- 
intendent, and the Director of the College. 

6. If he is unable to perform the practical work on 
account of his own sickness or some unavoidable cause, he 
shall communicate the fact to the instructor in charge or the 
special superintendent before the regular hour for the com- 
mencement of his work, and if he has been unable to work 
without interruption for more than one third of the period 
assigned for his practical work, he shall communicate the 
fact to the Director of the College through the instructor 
in charge or the special superintendent. 



122 COLLEGS OF ENGINEERING. 

7. While engaged in practical work whether in the. 
College or outside, students must wear the University 
uniform. 

8. In case any remuneration is offered to a student 
for his work, while devoting his time to practical work, or 
on the occasion of an excursion, he shall state the cass to 
the Director of the College and ask for his approval, without 
which approval he shall not he allowed to accept it. 

g. Students shall not be allowed to do anything except 
what they have been directed to do in the way of practical 
work, but if a student is obliged under some circumstances 
to alter any point of the direction previously given, he shall 
submit the matter to the chief instructor for his considera- 
tion and approval. 

10. In case a student wishes to take out of the College 
any instrument or apparatus for use in practical work, he 
must apply in writing to the chief instructor for permission 
to that effect. 

11. If the instrument or apparatus in the hands of a 
borrower be broken or lost, he may be required to make the 
necessary repairs or to pay a proper price in lieu thereof, 
acwordini:; to circumstances of the case. 

12. In case a student travels over a route not men- 
tioned on the postal map, he shall obtain a certificate from 
the local office of city, town, or village[as to the -number of 
ri over which he has passed, and in case he travels by sea 
or passes over a river, a receipt for passage money. 



VI. Laboratories. 

For the several courses of study in the College of 
Engineering, there are laboratories which are placed under 



r 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. I23. 

the control of the respective Professors. In the Labora- 
tory or Workshops of Mechanical Engineering,, students 
get their first ideas of Machine tools, and practical work. 
For these purposes, various kinds of steam engines, gas- 
engines, hot-air engines, &c. are fitted up as prime movers. 
The Water Supply and the Electric Light Arrangement of 
the University are in the workshop, thus giving the stu- 
dents ample means of making all kinds of experiments 
connected with water and electricity. The workshop is 
also well provided with Shaping, Planing, Shearing, Slot- 
ting, Drilling, Punching and Screwing Machines, Lathes 
&c. and also with good varieties of testing machines for 
experimenting on the strength of materials. 

In the Laboratory of Mining and Metallurgy, special 
arrangements have been made for assaying, ore-dressing, 
metallurgy and mining. For assaying there are two 
MufBe furnaces and two wind furnaces with balences and 
other necessary apparatus ; and, as an apparatus for wet 
assaying is also provided, both methods of dry and Wet 
assaying can be followed. Besides many models and ap- 
paratus for ore dressing, Blacke's hand cruster, trommels 
and jiggars are provided for use in practical work. For 
processes in metallurgy, one reverberatory furnace, two 
shaft furnaces and an amalgamating barrel and a pan 
are provided, so that metallurgical experiments are con- 
ducted in the roasting and smelting of such minerals as 
gold, silver, copper, lead &c., and the metallurgy of iron 
is also studied both theoretically and practically. In 
mineralogy, students are provided with apparatus for blow- 
pipe analysis, and are made acquainted with the methods 
of determining minerals by simple experiments. 

There are, besides those above mentioned, laboratories 



124 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

especially fitted for the study of Electrical Engineering, 
Applied Chemistry, &c. 



Vn. Museums. 

The following Museums have been established in the 
College of Engineering, where specimens, models, instru- 
ments &c. necessary for each course of study are collected 
in order to illustrate lectures and to be used as references 
in designing, drawing and also for other purposes of 
practical work. 

Museum for Civil Engineering. 

2. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



„ „ Mechanical Engineering. 

„ ,, Naval Architecture. 

„ ,, Electrical Engineering. 

„ ,, Architecture. 

„ „ Applied Chemistry. 

„ ,, Mining and Metallurgy. 

The collections in the above Museums comprise, for 
Civil Engineering, models of railroads, bridges, canals, 
ports, water-works, drainages &c. to the number of about 
250 ; in Mechanical Engineering various kinds of machines, 
instruments, models of steam engines and samples of test 
pieces tested, in all about 2520 ; in Naval Architecture, 
models of various kinds of war and commercial ships, 
marine engines, charts &c., about 890, together with 
models, specimens, and diagrams relating to Technology of 
Arms, numbering about 130; in Electrical Engineering 
various models, specimens and instruments relating to 
telegraphy, telephony, electric lighting, electric power, and 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. I25 

Other subjects in general physics about 1630 ; in Architec- 
ture, models of houses both in Japanese and foreign style 
in many different varieties and also of Earthquake-proof 
building, together with models and plates &c. to be used by 
drawing classes, in all about 5600 ; in Applied Chemistry 
specimens of porcelain, fayence, glass, bronze wareis, fibres, 
papers, dyestuffs, pigments, oils, soaps, dyed and printed 
fabrics, chemical preparations &c., manufactured either in 
Japan or foreign countries, in all about 3140 pieces; in 
Mining and Metallurgy, models, specimens, instruments 
and apparatus relating to Mineralogy, Geology, Ore deposit, 
Assaying, Mining, Dressing, Metallurgy, about 1,0920. 



XIV. COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

I. Officers. 



Director'. 

MASAKAZU TOYAMA, Bungakuhakushi, M. A. (Michigan Univer- 
sity), Professor, 

Professors, 

M\SAKAZU TOYAMA, Bungakuhakushi, M. A. (Michigan Univer- 
sity), Sociology. 
CHOREI SHIMADA, Bungakuhakushi. 

Chinese Classics and Chinese Language. 

TAKAMI MOZUME, Japanese Language, Literature and History, 

LUDWIG RIESS, Magister Artium Liberalium, Doctor Philosophiae 

(Berlin University.) History, 

HISASHI HOSHINO, Bungakuhakushi. 

YUJIRO MOTORA, Bungakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity.) Psychology, Ethics, and Logic, 
TETSUJIRD INOUYE, Bungakushi, Bungakuhakushi. 

Philosophy and History of Philosophy, 
KUMAZO TSUBOI, Bungakushi, Rigakushi, Bungakuhakushi. 

History and Geograyhy, 
CARL ADOLF FLORENZ, Magister Artium Liberalium, Doctor 
Philosophias (Leipzig University.) 

German Language and Literature, and Comparative Philology, 
EMILE heck, Licencie es lettres de la Faculte de Poitiers. 

French Language and Literature, 

RIKIZO NAKASHIMA, B. A. (Western Reserve University), B. D.. 

Ph. D, (Yale University.) Psychology, Ethics and Logic, 

HIROSHI KURITA. yapanese Language, Literature and History, 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I27 

RAPHiEL VON KOEBER, Doctor Philosophic (Heidelberg Univcf^ 
sity.) Philosophy , 

MAYORI KUr.OKAWA, Bungakuhakushi. 

yafanese Language^ Literature and History^ 

KAZUTOoHI UYEDA, Bungakushi. Comparative Philology^ 

f TSUUMEI NEMOTO, Chinese Classics a7uf Chinese Language. 

Assistant Professors. 

SANJI MIKAMI, Bungakushi, 

yapanese History and History of Legal Institutions. 
KUWASABURO TAKATSU, Bungakushi. yapanese Literature. 

YOSHINARI TANAKA, 

yapanese History^ Chinese Hiziory and Diplomatics. 
TAISUKE HAYASHI. 

Chinese History^ Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Classics. 
MANKICHI VVADA, Bungakushi. 

Lecturers, 

NAIBU KANDA, M. A. (Amherst College.) Latin. 

SENSEI MURAKAMI. Buddhism. 

SEIICHI NOJIRI. Pedagogics. 

GENPACHI MITSUKURI,Rigakushi, Ph. D. (Tubingen University.) 

History. 
DAIHACHI MIYAJIMA. Chinese Classics and Chinese Langttag e* 

TAKESATO II DA. yapatiese Language^ Literature and History, 

TSUUSEI NAKA. Chinese Classics and Chinese Language. 

YAKUMO KOIZUMI. English Language and Literature. 

EMILIO BIN DA. Italian Language. 

Emeritus Professor of the Imperial University. 

BASIL HALL CHAMBERLAIN, 

Late Professor of the Literature College. 



^ 



128 



COLLEGb OF LITERATURE. 



II. Courses of Instruction. 

The following nine courses, each of which extends 
over three years, are established in this College: 

1. Philosophy. 

2. Japanese Literature. 

3. Chinese Literature. 

4. Japanese History. 

5. History. 

6. Comparative Philology. 

7. English Literature. 

8. German Literature. 
q. French Literature. 



PHILOSOPHY. 
First Year. 

Hours per week. 

ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

"General Introduction to Philosophy] [4 — 

History of European Philosophy }"[ — 5 5 

Japanese Literature i i i 

Chinese Literature 3 3 3 

Phsiologyy 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

Oernian 3 3 3 

*History 3 3^ 

^Zoology 3 3 3 

*Geology 3 3 3 

•Any two of them to be selected. 



college of literature. i2g 

Second Year. 

Hcurs per week._ 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3fd Term. 

History of European Philosophy 3 — — 

Logic and Theory of Knowledge 3 3 3 

Sociology 3.3 3 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Chinese Philosophy i i i 

Buddhism 2 2 2 

Psychology 3 3 3 

Ethics 3 3 3 

Latin (Optional) 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 

iEsthetics and History of Art 222 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Chinese Philosophy 222 

Buddhism 2 2 2 

Psychiatria 2 2 2 

Philosophical Exercises 3 3 3 

^Ethics 3 3 3 

* Psychology (Psycho-physics) 3 3 3 

*Sociology 3 3 3 

^Sanskrit 2 2 2 

*Greek 3 3 3 



*Any one of these to be selected. 



130 COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

JAPANESE LITERATURE. 
First Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term 

General Introduction to Philosophy ... 4 — — 

History 3 3 3 

Japanese History 222 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan. 222 

Japanese Literature 444 

Chiness Literature 3 3 3 

Japanese Language 444 

tEnglish 3 3 3 

tFrench 3 3 3 

tGerman 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Psychology — 3 3 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Comparative Philology 2 2 2 

Japanese History 222 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan 222 

Japanese Literature -; ^ ''" 

it(3) +(3) t(3) 

Chinese Literature J 

l+(3) +(3) t(3) 
Chinese History i i i 

Japanese Language 444 

tEnglish 3 3 3 

fAny two of these to be selected. 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I3I 

Hours per week. 
1st Terra, and Term. 3rd Termi 

*t French 3 3 3 

^tGerman 3 3 3 

Third Year. 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Terra* 

jEsthetics and History of Art 2 2 2 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

Comparative Philology 2 2 2 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Chinese Philosophy 222 

Sociology 3 3 3 

Japanese Literature 3 3 3 

Chinese History i i i 

Japanese Language 5 5 5 

French or German 3 3 3 



CHINESE LITERATURE. 
First Year. 



Hours per weak. 
1st Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 



5 5 



General Introduction to Philosophy 
History of European Philosophy 

History 3 3 3 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan i i i 

History of Legal Institutions of China 3 3 3 

Japanese Literature i i i 

Chinese History 3 3 3 

•Either of these to be selected. 



132 COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

He UTS per week, 

ist Tenn. and Terra. 3rd Tern. 

Chinese Philosophy 6 6 6 

Chinese Language (i.).andLiterature(2) 3 .3 3 

English (optional) 3 3 3 

French (optional) 3 3 3 

^German (optional) 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 

I St Term. 2nd f erm. 3rd Term. 

History of European Philosophy 3 — — 

Psychology — 3 3 

-History 3 3 3 

''•'Logic and Theory of Knowledge 3 3 3 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Chinese Phiiosoph)' 6 6 6 

Buddhism 2.22 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan i i i 

History of Legal Institutions of China 3 3 3 

Japanese History i i i 

Japanese Literature i i i 

Chinese History 3 3 3 

"Chinese Language (i) and Literature (i) 222 

' English (optional) 3 3 3 

French (optional) 3 3 3 

German (optional) 3 3 3 



Third Year. 



Hcurs per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 



Ethics 3 3 3 

^Esthetics and History of Art 222 



•Either of these to be selected. 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I33 



Hours per week, 
ist Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 



Pedagogics 222 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Chinese Philosophy 3 3 3 

Buddhism 222 

Sociology .....3 3 3 

Japanese History i i i 

History of Legal Institutions of China. 222 

Chinese History 3 3 3 

Chinese Language (i) and Literature 

(i) 222 



JAPANESE HISTORY. 
First Year. 

. Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

General Introduction to Philosophy ... 4 ' — — 

History 3 3 3 

Japanese History and Geography 6 6 6 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan. 222 

Japanese Literature 222 

Chinese Literature 2 2 2 

Chinese History and Institutions 3 3 3 

Comparative History of Political In- 
stitutions 3 3 3 

Diplomatics :.. i i i 

English, French or German, ,;..., 3 3 3 



134 college of literatue. 

Second Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term, and Term. 3^^ Tenn, 

History 3 3 3 

Japanese History and Geography 6 6 6 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan. 444 

Japanese Literature 3 3 3 

Chinese Literature i i ^ 

Chinese History and Institutions ^ 2 ^ 

Diplomatics i i i 

English, French or German 3 3 3 

Third Year. 

Hours per week. 
I St Terni. and Term. 3rd Tern* 

Esthetics and History of Art 222 

Pedagogics 222 

'^Comparative Philology 222 

*History 222 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 222 

tChinese Philosophy 222 

tBuddhism 222 

Sociology 3 3 3 

Japanese History 6 6 6 

History of Legal Institutions of Japan. 3 3 3, 

Chinese History and Institutions i i i 



HISTORY. 
First Year. 

General Introduction to Philosophy . . 4 ' 



Hours per week. 
1st Term.' 2nd Term. 3rd Term* 



•Either of these to be selected. f do. 



J 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I35 

Hours per week, 
xst Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Physical Geography i i i 

History and Geography 7 7 7 

Japanese History 3 3 3 

Chinese History 2 2 2 

Diplomatics i i i 

Latin 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2od Term. 3rd Term 

Anthropology 2 2 2 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

Sociology 3 3 3 

History and Geography 8 8' 8 

Japanese History 3 3 3 

Chinese History 2 2 2 

Diplomatics i i i 

Latin 3 3 3 

German ' 3 3 3 

Third Year. 

Hours per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term, sid T«;r 

^Esthetics and History of Art 222 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

History and Geography 8 8 8 

Japanese History 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 



13^ COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY. 
First Year. 

Hours per week. 

I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term" 

Comparative Philology 2 2 2 

Japanese Language 2 2 2 

Chinese Language 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

Greek 2 2 2 

German S ^ 3 

^■■«n<=h 3 3 3 

Anthropology 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 

I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Comparative Philology i i i 

Phonetics i i i 

Comparative Grammar of Romance 

and Teutonic Languages 2 2 2 

Japanese Language 222 

Chinese Language o . o o 

L^"" 3 3 3 

German ^ ^ ^ 

Sanskrit 222 

Greek (optional) 



Ill 



Third Year. 



Hours per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 



Comparative Grammar of Indo-Eu 

ropean Languages 2 

Exercises in Comparative Philology... 2 2 



2 2 



2 



i 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I37 

Chinese Language 3 3 3 

Corean Language 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

Sanskrit 222 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

Aino Language (optional) i i i 



ENGLISH LITERATURE. 
First Year. 



Hours per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term 



4 . — — 

— 55 



General Introduction to Philosophy' 
History of European Philosophy .... 

-History 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

T7 u (3 3 3 

French ■', . . 

i"*(3) "(3)- "(3) 

f 'J Q -2 

German i*^, ^ ^ 

English , Ill 



Second Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of European Philosophy 3 — — 

Psychology — 3 3 

*History 3 3 3 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 2 2 

* Any one of these to be selected. 



138 COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

Hours per week. 
i8t Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 

Phonetics i i i 

Comparative Grammar of Romance 

and Teutonic Languages 2 2 2 

Latin 3 3 3 

French P ,^ A 

Hz) *(3) ""is) 

German P ^ ^^ 

l*(3) *{3) *(3) 
English J 7 7 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

-Esthetics and History of Art 222 

Pedagogics .'. 222 

Japanese Literature 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

French 3 3 3 

English 9 9 9 



GERMAN LITERATURE. 
First Year. 



Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 



General Introduction to Philosophy) (4 — — 

History of European Philosophy J \ — 5 5 

^History ^ ^ 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

English J3 3 3 

^ 1^(3) -(3) n3> 

•Any one of these to be selected. 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I39 

Hours per week, 
xst Term, zod Term. 3rd Term. 

French {^, , ^,3, ^3 

V^(3) *(3) *(3) 

German Ill 



Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
I8t Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 

History of European Philosophy 3 — — 

Psychology — 3 3 

^History 3 3 3 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 222 

Phonetics i i i 

Comparative Grammar of Romance and 

Teutonic Languages 222 

Latin 3 3 3 

English \l 3 3 

l'"'(3) "(3) "^(3) 
German Ill 

Third Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term. 2114 Term. 3rd Terra. 

Esthetics and History of Art 2 2 2 

Pedagogics 222 

Japanese Literature 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

German 999 

*Any one of these to be selected. 



X40 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 



FRENCH LITERATURE. 



First Year. 



Hours per week. 
1st Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 



General Introduction to Philosophy! ( 4 
History of European Philosophy )\ — 

* History 3 

Latin 3 

■-  \i 



English 



German 



5 
3 
3 
3 
(3) *(3) 



(3 



1*(3) *(3) 



French 7 



5 
3 
3 
3 

*(3) 
3 

*(3) 
7 



Second Year. 



Hours per week, 
ist Term, and Term. 3rd Term 



History of European Philosophy 3 

Psychology — 

^History 3 

Comparative Religion and Oriental 

Philosophy 2 

Phonetics i 

Comparative Grammar of Romance and 

Teutonic Languages '.. 2 

Latin 3 

3 



German 



l*(3) 



French 7 



3 
3 

2 
I 

2 

3 
3 

*(3) 
7 



3 
3 

2 
I 

2 

3 

3 

=(3) 

7 



•Any one of these to be selected. 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. I4I 



Third Year. 



Hours per week, 
ist Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 

Esthetics and History of Art 2 2 2 

Pedagogics 222 

Japanese Literature 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

French 9 9 9 



In addition to the regular courses of the College, the 
following elective course has been established for the 
students of this College as well as of the other Colleges. 
Those who desire to pursue this elective course must first 
obtain permission from the Director of the Literature 
College. 

Italian. 

Upon request of students, lectures may be delivered 
on subjects not included in the above courses when cir- 
cumstances may admit 



XV. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 
L Offioers; 



Director. 

KENJIRO YAMAGAWA, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. B. (Yale University), 
Prpfessor, 

Professors. 

EDWARD DIVERS, M.D. (Dublin Unrversity), F.R. S.. F.LC, F.e.S. 
(London aud Berlin). Chemistry^ 

DAIROKU KIKUCHI. Rigakuhakushi, M.A. (Ga'iitab). 

Mathematics. 

KENJIRO YAMAGAWA, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. B. (Yale University). 

Physics. 

J0JI SAKURAI, Rigakuhakushi, F.C.S. (London). Chemistry. 

KAKICHI MITSUKURI, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins 
University). Zoology, 

HISASHI TERAO, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Licenci^ es sciences 
et math^matiques, (Faculty des sciences de Paris). Astronomy . 

BUNJIRO KOTO, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Leipzig Uni- 
versity). Geology t Paleontology and Mineralogy , 

ISAO IIJIMA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Leipzig University). 

Zoology . 

RIKITARO FUJISAWA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Strass- 
burg University). Mathematics. 

MATAJIRO YOKOYAMA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi. 

Geology t Paleontology and Mineralogy. 

JINZO MATSUMURA, Rigakuhakushi. Botany. 

AIKITSU TANAKADATE, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, F. R. S. (Edin- 
burgh). Physics and Seismology. 

SHOGORO TSUBOI, Rigakushi. Anthropology. 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. I43 

SHIN HIRAYAMA, Rigakushi. Astronomy. 

MANABU MIY03HI, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Mitglied der deu- 

tschen botanischen Gesellschaft. Botany, 

KOTORAJIMBO, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Miltglied der kaiserli- 

chen mineralogischen Gesellschaft in St. Petersburg. 

Geology i Paleontology and Mineralogy, 
HANTARO NAGAOKA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi. 

Applied Mathematics, 

Assistant Professors. 

KENJI TSURUDA, Rigakushi. Physics. 

KIKUNAYE IKEDA, Rigakushi. Chemistry. 



II. Courses of Instruobion. 

The following seven courses, each of which extends 
over three years, are established in this College :-- 



I. 


Mathematics. 


2. 


Astronomy. 


3- 


Physics. 


4- 


Chemistry. 


5- 


Zoology. 


6. 


Botany. 


7- 


Geology. 



MATHEMATICS. 
First Year. 



Hours pe 
week. 



Calculus 5 

Geometry 3 



144 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 



Hcurs per 
week. 



Dynamics 3-4 

Spherical Astronomy 2 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Physical Laboratory Two afternoons. 



Second Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Differential Equations and Theory of 

Elliptic Functions 3 

Geometry 2 

Least Squares \' i^SlL^'''"): 

^ (2 (2nd Term> 

Dynamics 2 

Physics 5 

Select Chapters in Mathematics (optional)One afternoon. 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Physical Laboratory Two afternoons. 



Third Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Theory of Functions 3 

Dynamics 3 

Physics (optional) 6 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Mathematical Seminary (optional) One afternoon. 

Theoretical Astronomy (optional) 3 



ASTRONOMY. 
First Ykar. 

Hours per 
week. 

Calculus 2 

Analytical Geometry 3 (ist Term). 



COLLEGE OF SCIliNCE. I45 

Hrurs per 
week. 

Dynamics 3-4 

Spherical Astronomy 3 

Practical Astronomy 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 



Second Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Differential Equations and Theory of 

Elliptic Functions 3 

Least Squares i^ S^^M!^"")- 

_ ( 2 (2nd leim). 

Dynamics 2 

Physics is lllalfa Year). 

•^ b (Half a Year). 

Astronomy !2(istand2nd ierms). 

•^ U(3rd Term). 

Practice 

Mathematical Exercises One afternoon. 

Physical Laboratory Three aflernoons. 



Third Year. 

Hours per 
week. 

Dynamics 3 

Theoretical Astronomy 3 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Practice 

Theory of P'unctions (optional) 3 



PHYSICS. 
First Yeae. 



Hours per 
week. 

Calculus 5 

nAlaytical Geometry 3 (ist Term). 



146 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

Hours per 
week 

Dynamics 3-4 

Spherical Astronomy 2 

Chemical Laboratory Three afternoons. 

( I St & 2nd Terms). 

Physical Laboratory Three afternoons. 

(3rd Term). 
Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 



Second Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Differential Equations and Theory of 

Elliptic Functions 3 

Least Squares UJ^rdTe™';. 

Dynamics 2 

Physics 5 

Mathematical Exercises One afternoon. 

Physical Laboratory 



Third Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Dynamics 3 

Physics 6 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Astronomical Practice 4 

Physical Laboratory 

Theory of Functions (optional) 3 



COLLEGE OE SCIENCE. I47 

CHEMISTRY. 
First Year. 

Hours per 
week. 

Phjsics 3 (Last half 

of the academic 
year) 

Inorganic Chemisiry 3 

Physiological Chemistry with Laboratory 

Work 3 (ist Term). 

Analytical Chemistry 2 (and and 3rd 

Term). 

Chemical Laboratory 

Calculus (optional) 5 (ist and 2nd 

Terms). 

Mathematical Exercises (optional) One afternoon 

(ist and 2nd 

Terms). 
Second Year. 

Hours per 
week. 

Physics 5 (ist and 2nd 

Terms). 

Physical Laboratory Two afternoons. 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Organic Chemistry 3 (dst^d^d Terms). 

Chemical Laboratory 



Third Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Theoretical and Physical Chemistry 3 

Chemical Laboratory 



148 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 



ZOOLOGY AND BOTANY. 



Fjrst Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



General Zoology 3 

Osteology i (2nd and 3rd 

Terms). 

Zoological Laboratory 10 

General Botany 3 

Determination of Plants, and Laboratory 

Work on Vegetable Anatomy 10 

Geology 3 

Physiological Chemistry with Laboratory 

Work 3 (ist Term). 

Determination of Rocks and Minerals ... 2 (2nd and 3rd 

Terms.) 



Second Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Special Subject (optional) 2 

Systematic Botany 4 

Laboratory Work on Vegetable Anatomy 

and Physiology 10 

Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrate 

Animals 3 

Histology and Embryology; Lectures 

and Laborator}' 12 

Physiology 3 

Paleontology 2 

Marine Laboratory 



college of science. i49 

Third Year. 
ZOOLOGY. 

Hours per 
week. 

Special Subject 2 

Zoological Laboratory 

Parasitology 2 (ist Term). 

Bacteriological Laboratory Two afternoons. 

(2nd Term). 
Anthropology' 2 



BOTANY. 



Hours per 
week. 



Vegetable Physiology 2 (ist Term). 

Botanical Laboratory 20 

Bacteriological Laboratory Two afternoons. 

(2ncl Term). 

GEOLOGY. 
First Year. 

Hours per 
week. 

Geology .. 3 

Mineralogy 2 

Lithology 2 

General Zoology 3 

Osteology i (2nd and 3rd 

Terms). 

Zoological Laboratory 4 

Chemical Laboratory Two afternoons. 

Lithological Laboratory Two afternoons. 

Mineralogical Laboratory 2 

Geological Excursions 



150 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 



Second Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Paleontology ; 2 

Paleontological Laboratory 3 

Crystallography 2 

Crystallographical Laborator}' Two afternoons. 

Botany 4 

Botanical Laboratory 3 

Geological Laboratory 



Geological Excursions 



Third Year. 



Hours per 
week. 



Geological Colloquium 

Geological and Mineralogical Laboratory 

Seismology (optional) 2 (ist Term). 

Anthropology (optional) 2 

In addition to these courses of study, special lectures 
are given in the College of Science for the students of the 
J other Colleges, especially for the students of Civil En- 

gineering and Architecture of the Engineering College, on 
Seismology, and for the students of History and Philo- 
logy of the Literature College, on Anthropology. 

Seismology Two hours a week (ist Term)* 

Anthropology Two hours a week. 

Valuable Collections of specimens, models, instru- 
ments, &c. are attached to the laboratories and placed 
under the cliarge of the several Professors. 



COLLEGE OF SCFENCE. I ^l 

m. Museums of the Natural Scienec Department- 

ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The Zoological Museum attached to the Zoological 
Institute contains specimens collected in all parts of the 
country by instructors and students of the College or 
obtained by exchange from foregin museums, etc. The 
collection is especially rich in Invertebrates and contains 
many specimens which have been used as type- specimens 
in investigations carried on in the Institute. To enumerate 
more notable objects in the Museum ; specimens of Jap- 
anese birds number about 2500, distributed among about 
400 species, including by far the largest part of our 
avifauna ; the most noteworthy is Picus Richardsi from 
Tsushima (See Jour. Coll. Sc. Vol. V.). Nearly all the 
common species of our reptiles and amphibians, and a 
large number of our fishes are represented. The Crus- 
tacea are especially well represented with specimens from 
Misaki (Sagami), Tomo (Bingo), Bonin Islands and other 
southern parts. The Molluscs of our coasts are fairly well 
collected. Many species of Opisthobranchiata and Pulmo- 
nata have been collected. A representative collection of 
shells donated by the Boston Society of Natural History 
forms one of the most valuable parts of our museum. The 
collection of Insects is rich in specimens from Tokyo, Nik- 
ko, Gifu, Loo-choo etc. Among Echimoderms, Annelids, 
Ecto- and Endo-parasites and other vermes, and coelente- 
rates, a large part of the specimens brought tojjether 
belong either to entirely new species or are new to our 
fauna. A very noteworthy feature of the Museum is a 
collection of beautiful and remarkable Hexactinellidae 



152 COI.LHGE OF SCIENCE. 

recently brought to light in the Sagami Seas. The collec- 
tion altogether contains about 6000 species. 

GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The Geological Museum of the College of Science is 
on the gronnd-floor of the new building of the Natural 
Science School. The whole collection is distributed among 
five Sections ; viz., Stratigraphical, Palaeontological, Miner- 
alogical, Petrographical, and lastly a Section set apart 
especially for the reception of the home specimens of 
minerals, rocks, and fossils. 

(i) The stratigraphical portion, including both rocks 
and petrifactions, is, as usual, arranged according to eras 
and periods, commencing from the Cambrian up to the 
Recent. (2) The palaeontological collection is arranged 
in zoological and botanical orders. (3) Minerals are 
exhibited in two distinct sets ; one to illustrate their 
physical properties, the other according to their chemical 
composition, (4) the petrographical specimens being clas- 
sified also upon the chemical principle. They are all from 
foreign localities, the specimen number running up to 
10,900. 

(5) The last section, kept separate, contains ths col- 
lection of objects found in the country. Among the 
minerals of this division are to be mentioned the well- 
known Stibnite of Shikoku, the Anorthite-crystals from 
Myakejima, Cordierite in contact rocks from various 
localities, and Topaz, Quartz, and Felspars of Mino and 

A 

Omi. Rock-specimens are mainly crystallines, semi-crys- 
tallines and Andesites, including Piedmontite-schist, Glau- 
cophane- schist, Cordierite-andesite, Piedmontite-rhyolite, 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. I53 

Sanukite, Boninite, Myakite and the Cordierite-ejectment 
of Asama. 

The palaeonotological portion includes Ammonites of 
Rikuzen and Hokkaido, and the Mesozoic pl.ints from 

A 

Tosa and Kaga ; while the Tertiary shells of Oji, the 
impressions of plants of the same age from Mogi, Shiobara 
and elsewhere form not an unimportant part of the collec- 
»tion. The mammalian remains— the Stegodons and a bison 
from Sh6do-shima are the prominent object in the 
Museum. 

Besides these, there are large plaster and wood models, 
illustrating the manifestation of volcanoes, the formation 
of fold mountains after Favre, and various earth-sculptures, 
intended for the instruction of students. Among others 
are the rock and fossil types described by graduates and 
Professors, and the original specimens of the Japanese 
Triassic by von Mojsisovics. 

HERBARIUM OF THE BOTANICAL 
LABORATORY. 

Specimens of dried plants are kept in this laboratory 
for investigation to aid in the study of systematic botany. 
The Catalogue of Plants in the Herbarium of the College 
of Science published in 1886 contains two thousand eight 
hundred and ninty-nine species and varieties of both native 
and cultivated plants, one hundred and forty-one species 
of Corean, one hundred and thirty-eight species of Chinese 
plants. They are arranged according to the natural 
system of classification into Dicotyledones, Monocotyle- 
dones, and Filices. The above catalogue does not con- 
lain the herbarium of our lower cryptogams nor the 



154 COLLEGE Cr SCIENCE. 

specimens of phanerogams sent frcm Europe, America^ 

and Australia : these amount to about the same number as- ; 

I 

is enumerated in the catalogue. Our herbarium is increas- 
ing yearly. The additions were made by the collections j 
from Okinawa, Hokkaido, and various other localities* 
Recently another valuable addition has been made of 
Chinese plants collected by Dr. Henry, the well knowrt 
botanical collector in that country. 

ANTHROPOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The collections belonging to the Anthropologicat 
Institute are divided into two portions : — 

(A) Typical, rare or scientifically valuable specimens* 

(B) Materials to be used for minute examinations 
and comparative studies. 

Of these the first portion is placed in a chamber con- 
nected with the lecture room and the laboratory of the 
Institute, while the second is kept in a separate building. 

The chief objects to bs found in part A are as fol- 
lows : — 

Ethnographical collections from Hokkaido, Loochoo,. 
Formosa, China, Corea, Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia 
and America. 

Archaeological collections from Europe and America. 

Objects of prehistoric and protohistoric times of Japan* 

On the walls of the chamber are to be seen a set of 
maps showing the distribution of the principal races of man^ 

In the rooms specially fitted up to hold part B, Jap- 
anese archaeological objects, especially the stone age relics, 
are arranged in topograhical order. Beside these, several 
human skulls and many foreign antiquities are contained 
in this apartment. 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. I55 



IV. Tokyo Astronomical Observatory. 

The Tokyo Astronomical Observatory is attached to 
the College of Science. This Observatory is the result of 
the union of the Astronomical Observatory of the Science 
College with the Astronomical sections of the Observatories 
belonging to the Home and Naval Departments. It is 
situated on the spot formerly occupied by the Naval Obser- 
vatory in liguramachi-sanchome, Asabu, Tokyo ; the 
longitude and latitude at present in use being, 

Longitude + 139^ 44' 30^3 

Latitude 35^ 39' if .5 

The principal work carried on at the Observatory 
consists of astronomical observations and the constructions 
of the almanacs ; it is also fitted up for the purpose of 
instruction and practice of the students of the University 
Hall and of the College of Science. 

The principal instruments are as follows : 

(i) Transit instrument (by Repsold), aperture, 13.5 

c. m. ; focal length, 217 c. m. 
(ii) Transit Circle (by Repsold and Merz), aperture, 
14.3 c. m. ; focal length, 149 c. m. ; rad. of 
the Circle, 56.4 c. m. 
(iii) Equatorial {by Shroughton and Smith), aper- 
ture, 20 c. m. ; focal length, 270 c. m. 
(iv) Equatorial (by Merz), aperture, 16.2. cm.; 

focal length, 245 c. m. 
(v) Photoheliograph (by Brashear), aperture, 12.8 

c. m. ; focal length, 11.3 m. 
(vi) Phographic Doublet, aperture, 20.3 cm. ; focal 
length, 108 c m. 



156 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

By an arrangement with the Hydrographical Bureau, 
the officers of that Bureau are allowed, when necessary for 
its purpose, to use the instruments in the Observatory. 

At the request of the Department of Communcations, 
the standard mean time is given every noon to the Tokyd 
Post and Telegraph Office, whence it is distributed to all 
the telegraph stations of the Empire. It also gives the 
time to the party in charge of the signal gun fired every 
noon from the Castle grounds in TCkyo. 

In Compliance with the request of the Central Met* 
eorological Observatory the chronometer comparison is 
made here on Mondays and Thursdays by telegraph, for 
Meteorological purpose. 

Reports of the observations made here are published 
every year in one of the three European languages, En- 
glish, German or French, and exchanged with those of the 
other astronomical observatories of the world. 



V. Botanic Garden of the Imperial University. 

The Botanic Garden of the Imperial University is 
under the control of the College of Science and is situated 
in Hakuian-Gotenmachi, Koishikawa, about a mile north- 
west of the University, having an area of about forty-eight 
thousand and eight hundred tsubo. Plants are daily 
brought from it to the University for the use of the students. 
The students of Botany, of Entomology and of Pharmacy 
spend a portion of their time in the Garden, which contains 
over three thousand species of plants, both native and 
foreign. In the largest division of the Garden, plants are 
distributed according to Bentham and Hooker's system of 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. I57 

classification, as given in their Genera Piantarum, In 
another division, there is a collection of medicinal plants 
as well as of those plants which grow only in shady places ; 
there is also a collection of rare plants in pots. A green 
house, built in European style, contain many interesting 
tropical plants. There are also plant-houses in various 
Japanese styles, such as the Okamuro, Tomiiro^ Usakamuro, 
and Afiamtiro, A building in the eastern part of the 
Garden contains thft laboratory, and office. Attached to 
the Botanic Gerden is a very fine pleasure garden with 
a building well suited for the social gatherings of scientific 
and other societies. 

Though it is of considerable size the Herbarium 
belonging to the Botanic Garden is not so complete as that 
belonging to the Botanic Institute of the Science College. 
At the Botanic Garden the officials are always read^y to 
exchange duplicates of dried specimens of plants, or seeds 
with foreign botanists or institutions. The Botanic Garden 
is also prepared to exchange seeds. 

The regulations for admission to the Botanic Garden 
ai*e as follows : 

REGULATIONS FOR ADMISSION TO 

THE BOTANIC GARDEN OF THE 

IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 

I. The Botanic Garden of the Imperial University is 
under the control of the Science College and has been 
designed as a place for practical work and investigation 
in botany by the Professors and students of the Uni- 
versity. 

Any person who observes the following regulations 
may visit the Garden. 



158 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

2. The Botanic Garden shall be open for visitors daily 
(except from December 26th to January 5th) at the fol* 
lowing hours : 

7 a.m. — 5 p.m. From April ist to September 30th. 

8 a.m. — 4.30 p.m. From October ist to March 31st. 

N.B, — When admission to the Garden is tempo* 
rarily suspended, it will be notified at the gate of the 
Garden. 

3. Visitors, except the Professors and students of th« 
University, must present a ticket of admission. 

N,B. — Regular students of the University on visit- 
ing the Garden must wear the University uniform and 
other students must produce a certificatt furnished by 
the College of Science. 

4. The tickets of admission are of the following three 
kinds and can be obtained at one side of the garden gate. 

Ticket of red colour for Sundays 3 sen. 
,, ,, blue ,, ,, other days 2 sen. 
Special ticket of purple colour for 

Sundays 5 sen. 

N,B. — A child under the age of 5 years does not 
require a ticket of admission and one of 5 years to 10 
years may get a half price ticket of the first two kinds. 

5. The following persons, though possessing a ticket of 
admission, may be refused entrance to the Garden or be 
required to withdraw from it, as the case may be : — 

(i) Any person who is mad or intoxicated. 

(2) Any person wearing ge£a or hiyorigeta or taking 
with him a stick or any domestie animal. 

(3) Any person who touches, plucks, breaks or injures 
flowers, trees or any other property belonging to the 
Garden. 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. I59 

{4) Any person who drinks any intoxicating liquor 
within the Garden, sings loudly or makes any dis- 
turbing noise. 

6. Any one, who injures flowers, trees or any other 
property belonging to the Garden, shall be charged a 
proper sum in compensation for damage done. 

N,B. — When such a person is found to have done 
the act willfully, the case may be reported to a proper 
authority to take the necessary steps. 

7. When those Professors and students of the University, 
who are engaged in the study of botany, wish to pluck 
flowers &c. for use in their practical work, they may 
obtain, on application to the College of Science, a special 
permit to do so. 

N.B, — Any person, who is recommended by the 
Curator of the Botanic Garden as being specially in- 
terested in botany may obtain the same special permit 
according to the above rule. 

8. Those who bear a special permit according to the 
above rules, ard not, however, allowed to pluck flowers 
&c. by themselves, but must consult at the office of the 
Botanic Garden for instructions. 

9. Any person wishing to get any flowers, seeds or plants 
of the Garden may obtain some of the kinds, at proper 
prices, on application to the office of the Garden. 



VI, Seismological Observatory. 

The Seismological Observatory of the College o 
Science was founded in 1880 for the study of earthquak, 
phenomena, under the superintendence of Prof, J* A, 



l6o COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

Ewing, then occupying the chair of Engineering in Tokyo 
University. Here have been designed Horizontal- Pen- 
dulum and Vertical- Motion Seismographs now well known 
in the scientific world. By means of these instruments, 
numerous absolute measurements of earthquake motions 
have been obtained. The general results of these obser- 
vations, embodying much that is new and valuable, are 
published from time to time both in English and Jap- 
anese. 

By aid of the complete set of seismographs now in 
the Observatory, it is possible to measure earth-movements 
of difierent grades of magnitude, ranging from micro- 
scopical tremors almost to destructive earthquakes. In- 
struments have been placed in the seismological Obser- 
vatoy of the Imperial Univereity, in the Lecture-Hall near 
Hitotsubashi, in the Lighthouse of Kwannonzaki, and at 
vaiious other stations, for the study of earth movements 
and observation of the effects of seismic disturbance, 
whether on buildings or in the production of geological or 
topographic modifications. 

Seismometers having been put into the two borings 
near the Seismological Institute, it has been found by 
observations during earthquakes that the deeper under- 
ground movements ditTer greaty from the surface move- 
ments. Telegraphic connexions have recently been esta- 
blished between the Institute, and the three other places 
Hitotsubashi, Komatsugawa, and the Tokyo Astronomical 
Observetery, by the Earthquake Investigation Committee 
with a view to the accurate measurement of the velocity 
of earthquake propagation ; and the Institute is assisting 
the investigations of the Committee. Attached to the 
Institute is a workshop, where seismometers and- seis- 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. l6l 

mographs are manufactured, and where experiments are 
made with purpose of securing the greatest dehcacy and 
accuracy in such instruments, and of effecting other in- 
provements in them. On the occasion of any great earth- 
quake, members of the Institute are sent out at once to 
make all necessary investigations. 

Lectures on seismology are given by the Professor to 
students of Geology in the College of Seience, to students 
of Architecture and Civil Engineering in the Engineering 
College, and occasionally to students in other departments 
of science. 

The Institute is provided with a special h'brary, and 
with instruments and models for the use of students of 
Seismology. 



Vn. The Marine Biological Station. 

The Marine Biological Laboratory of the Imperia 
University is situated at Misaki, Sagami. Here a lot of 
ground was obtained in 1885 and a small laboratory was 
erected on it in 1887. The Laboratory is intended pri- 
marily for the use of the Instructors and students in 
Biology of the University. As Misaki and its neighbouring 
seas are teeming with marine life, and are, within a few 
miles of the deep seas, famous as the home of Hyalonema, 
Euplectella, Metacrinus etc., the students have unusual 
opportunities of making the acquaintance of marine 
animals and of carrying on investigations on them. The 
published results of such investigations are by no means 
few and the name of Misaki is already becoming known 
in Europe and America. Teachers of public and private 



l62 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

schools are also admitted into the laboratory under certain 
conditions. This has enabled many of them to obtain 
correct ideas in regard to the life of the sea and has also 
been the means of disseminating well preserved specimens 
among various schools all over the country. About two 
miles north from the station, there is a piece of ground, at 
Koajiro in Misaki, formerly parts of the ground of the 
ancient castle of Arai, which was added to the property 
of the Imperial University in March, 1896. The locality 
being naturally suited for the Marine Biological Station, it 
is intended to remove the Laboratory thither. 



i 



XVI. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

I. Officers. 



Director, 

NAOKICHI MATSUI, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Columbia College). 
Profeisor, 

Professors. 

JOHANNES LUDWIG JANSON. Veterinary Medicine. 

NAOKICHI MATSUI, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Columbia College). 

Agricultural Chemistry and Chemistry. 
DIRO KITAO, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D., M.A.L. (Gottingen Uuiversity). 

Organic Physics and Meteorology. 
CHIYOMATSU ISHIKAWA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Frei- 
burg University). Zoology^ Entomology^ and Sericulture. 
CHUJIRO SASAKI, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi. 

Zoology, Entomology, and Sericulture. 
KIZO TAMARI, N5gaku8hi, M.Sc. (Michigan Agricultural College). 

Horticulture. 
SENNOSUKE KATSUSHIMA, Juigakushi. 

Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, 
GIYEMON SUTO, Juigakushi. VeUrinary Medicine and Surgery. 

OSCAR LOEW, Ph. D. (Leipzig University). 

Agricultural Chemistry and Chemistry, 
TOKIYOSHI YOKOI, NOgakushi. Agriculture. 

ZENTARO KAWASe, Ringakushi. Forestry.^ 

K^SUKE HONDA, NOgakushi. Zootechny. 

KURANOSUKE MATSUZAKI, HOgakushi. 

Agricultural Politics and Political Economy* 



164 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



Assistant Professors. 

MONOSHIRO MORIYA, Rigakushi. Chemistry. 

KOTARO SHIRAI, Rigakushi. Botany. 

SEIROKU HONDA, Ringakushi, Ph.D. (Munich University). Forestry. 
MASATO TOYONAGA, NOgakushi. Agricultural Chemistry. 

MANKICHI SAITO, NOgakushi. Agriculture. 

KO TANAKA, Juigakushi. Veterinary Anatomy. 

SHITARO KAWAT, Ringakushi, Forestry. 

HATSUKUMA TOKISHIGE, Juigakushi. Physiology. 

SETSUSABURO TANAKA, NOgakushi. Agriculture. 

KEITARO TSUNO, Juigakushi. Pharmacology and Hygiene. 

.SEIICHIRO IKENO, Rigakushi. Botany. 

KIPPEI IMAI, Jiiigakushi. 

Horse-Shoeing ^ Hoof Pathology, and Exterior of Domestic Animals. 
MUNEYOSHI NAGAOKA, NOgdkushi. Agricultural Chemistry. 

HANSHIRO MIGITA, Ringakushi. Forestry. 

TETSUGORO WAKIMIZU, Rigakushi. Geology and Soils. 

Lecturers. 

TAIZAN SHIGA. Forestry. 

YOSHIJIRO OKAMOTO, Doctor Juris (Leipzig University). 

Encyclopedia of Laws. 

Instructors for the Subsidiary Courses. 

JOHEI TATARA. Mathematics and Fhysics. 

KOTARO OGURA, Juigakushi. Veterinary Anatomy and Pharmacology . 
SHOZABURO MIMURA, Ringakushi. Chemistry. 

Emeritus Professor of the Imperial University. 

OSCAR KELLNER, Ph. D. (Leipzig Univeraity). 

Late Professor of the 4igrieultttral Coilege% 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 165 

n. Courses of Instruotion. 

The following four courses, each of which extends over 
three years, are established in this College : — 

1. Agriculture. 

2. Agricultural Chemistry. 

3. Forestry. 

4. Veterinary Medicine. 



AGRICULTURE. 
First Year. 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2nd Term 3rd Ter.ti 

Geology 33^ 

Soils — — 3 

Meteorology — 2 2 

Vegetable Physiology 5 4 2 

Vegetable Pathology 2 2 2 

Animal Physiology 3 3 3 

Entomology 2 2 2 

Manures 222 

Agricultural Physics 2 2 2 

Political Economy 2 2 2 

Botanical Laboratory 
Zoological ,, 
Farm Practice 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term* 

Cultivation of Crops 5 5 3 

Amelioration of Soils 2 2 — 

Horticulture 3 3 3 



l66 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, 

Hours per week. 

1st Term, and Term. 3rd Term 

Zootechny 3 3 3 

Cattle-FeecHng 3 3 3 

Sericulture 2 2 — 

Encyclopedia of Laws ". 2' 2 2 

Farm Management — * — 3 

Botanical Laboratory : — 

Zoological Laboratory — 

AgricuUural Laboratory 

Third Year. 

H<urs per week, 

ist Term. 2nd Term. 3id Term 

Cultivation of Crops 3 — — 

Agricultural Technology 3 3 3 

Farm Management , 2 3 — ' 

Outlines of Veterinary Science 3 3 . ~^ 

Outlines of Forestry (optional) 3 3 — 

Fish-Culture (optional) 4 — — : 

Agricultural Politics 2 2 2  

Physiology of Insects (optional) ...... 2 2 — 

Agricultural Laboratory 

Thesis - — — 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 
First Year. 



Hours per wee'v. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term* 



Organic Chemistry 2 2 2 

Geology 3 3 — - 

Soils 3 

Meteorology 2* 2. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, 167 

Vegetable Physiology 5 4 2 

Animal Physiology 3 3 3 

Manures 2 2 2 

Agricultural Physics 2 2 2 

Political Economy (optional 2 2 a 

Chemical Labcratory. 

Second Year. 

Hcurs per week. 

I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Cultivation of Crops 5 5 3 

Amelioration of Soils 2 2 — 

Physiological Chemistry 3 3 — 

Chemistry of Fermentation — — 4 

Cattle-Feeding 3 3 3 

Sericulture 2 2 — 

Farm Management — — 3' 

Chemical Laboratory 

Third Year. 

Hcurs per week. 

1st Term, and ferm. srd Term. 

Principles of Chemistry 2 2 2 

Cultivation of Crops 3 — — 

Agricultural Technology 3 3 3 

Food and Stimulants — — 3 

Farm Management 2 3 — 

Agricultural Politics (optional) 2 2 2 

Chemical Laboratory 

Thesis — — 



l68 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

FORESTRY. 
First Year. 

Hours per week, 
ist Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 

Forest Mathematics 222 

Geology and Soils 3 3 3 

Meteorology — 2 2 

Forest Physics 222 

Least Sguares and Dynamics 22 — 

Forest Botany 2 2 2 

Vegetable Physiology 2 '2 2 

Forest Zoology 3 3 3 

Encyclopedia of Forestry 2 2 2 

Forest Surveying 222 

Sylviculture — — 2 

Political Economy 2 2 2 

Botanical Laboiatory 

Zoological Laboratory 

Practice in Forest Surveying 

Practice in Sylviculture — — 

Practical Forestry, Excursions 

Second Year. 

Hours per week. 
ist Term. 2Dd lerm. 3rd Term 

Forest Mathematics 2 — — 

Diseases of Trees 3 ~^ — 

Forest Chemistry 222 

Forest Utilization 2 2 2 

Forest Road Making 2 2 — 

Sylviculture 2 2 2 

Forest Protection — 2 2 

Forest Management — 2 2 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 169 

Hours ppf week. 
I St Terai. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Forest Administration — 2 2 

Encyclopedia of Laws 222 

Forest Laws .. / — — 3 

Forest Politics — — 3 

Finance 222 

Fish-Culture (optional) 2 2 — 

Outlines of Agriculture (optional) 2 2 — 

Practice in Forest Chemistry — 

Practice in Sylviculture — — 

Practice in Forest Road Makinij — — 



Ti:iRD Year. 



Hours per week. 
I St Term, and Term. 3rd Term. 



Forest Utilization 3 3 

Sylviculture 3 3 

Forest Management 2 2 

Forest Laws 3 3 

Forest Politics 3 3 

Hunting (optional) 2 2 

Practical Forestry, Excursions 

Thesis — — 



VETERINARY MEDICINE. 
First Year. 



Hours pc t .veek. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 



Anatomy 6 6 6 

Physiology 6 6 6 

Histology 3 3 3 



170 COLLEGE OF AGRI U ULTURF. 

Hours per week, 

ist Terrr. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

General Pathology 3 3 

Operative Surgery — 3 3 

Horse- Shoeing 222 

Anatomy (practical) 15 15 — 

Histology (practical) — — 10 

Horse-Shoeing (practical) — — 4 

Second Year. 

Hf urs per week, 
I St Term, and Term. 3rd Term 

Anatomy 5 5 — 

Physiology 22 — 

Cattle Feeding 3 3 3 

General Pathology • 3 — — 

Pharmacology 3 3 3 

Surgery 444 

Special Pathology • 4 4 4 

Pathological Anatomy — — 3 

Parasitology — 2 2 

Hoof Pathology — — 2 

Veterinary Hygiene — — 2 

Dispensing — — 6 

Anatomy (practical) 15 15 — 

Operative Surgery (practical) 3 3 — 

Horse-Shoeing (practical) 44 — 

Hospital Practice and Ambulatory 

Clinic — — 17 

Third Year. 

Hour=i per week. 

I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Zootechny 3 3 3 

Pathological Anatomy 3 — — 



J 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTLRE. I7I 

Hours per week 

ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Dermato-pathology i i — 

Hoof Pathology 2 — — 

Hipology 3 3 3 

Animal Plagues 2 2 2 

Obstetrics 3 3 — 

Ophthalmology i r — 

Veterinary Hygiene 22 — 

Embryology 2 2 — 

Veterinary Police — — 3 

Veterinary Jurisprudence — — 3 

Examination of Milk and Meats 2 — — 

Pathological Anatomy (practical) 6 6 — 

Pathological Histology and Bacteriolo- 
gy (practical) — 3 3 

Practice in Examination of Milk and 

Meats 4 — — 

Hospital Practice and Ambulatory 

Clinic 17 17 17 



in- Regulations for Graduation in the Course of 

Veterinary Medicine. 

1. In the course of Veterinary Medicine, in place of 
annual examinations, Graduation Examinations are held 
at the end of the third year, on the chief subjects studied 
during the first, second, and third years. 

2. Th6 chief subjects are as follows : — 

I. Anatomy.., 
II. Physiology. 



172 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

III. Pharmacology. 

IV. Pathology. 
V. Surgery. 

VI. Pathological Anatomy. 
VII. Horse-shoeing (practical). 
VIII. Hospital Practice and Ambulatory 
Clinic. 

3. The highest mark for each chief subject is 100. 

4. The graduation mark is determined by adding 
together thrice the average of the year marks for the first 
and second years, the average term mark for the third 
year, and four times the average mark gained at the 
graduation examinations, and then dividing the sum thus 
obtained by 8. 

5. When the graduation mark and the mark for each 
subject in the graduation examinations are in each case 60 
or over, the student is entitled to a diploma of gradua- 
iion. 

6. When the graduation mark is 60 or over, while 
the mark for any one subject in the graduation examina- 
tions is under 60 but over 50, the student is degraded. 

7. When the graduation mark is 60 or over, while 
the marks for two or more subjects are under 60, or the 
mark for any one subject is under 50, the student is dis- 
missed. 



IV. Regulations for Subsidiary Cotirses in Agriculture, 
Forestry and Veterinary Medicine- 

I. The following subsidiary courses in agriculture, 
forestry, and veterinary medicine have been established 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. I73 

in order to meet the demand for practical men versed in 
these branches of study. 

2. Each course extends over three years and is divid- 
ed into three classes. 

3. The courses of instruction are as follows : — 



SUBSIDIARY COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

First Year. 

Hrurs per week, 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 

Physics 5 5^ 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 3 — 

Botany — 3 — 

Zoology 2 2 — 

Injurious Insects 2 2 — 

Cultivation of Crops 3 3 — 

Farm Practice 

Second Year. 

Hcurs per week. 
I St Term, and Tenn. 3rd Teim. 

Organic Chemistry 2 2 — 

Soils 22 — 

Manures 2 2 — 

Cultivation of Crops 3 3 — 

Vegetable Pathology 22 — 

Horticulture 3 2 — 

Sericulture — 3 — 

Zootechny 2 2 — 

Cattle Feeding 2 2 — 

Farm Practice 

Third Yrar. 

Hcurs per week. 
ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Cultivation of Crops 3 3 — 

Zootechny 2 2 — 



174 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

Agricultural Technology 3 3 

Farm Management 3 3 

Outlines of Veterinary Science 2 2 

Outlines of Forestry 2 2 

Farm Practice 



SUB'SIDIARY COURSE IN FORESTY. 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2pd Term, srd Term. 

Algebra 4 2 — 

Geometry 4 3 — 

Trigonometry — 2 2 

Physics 3 3 3 

Meteorology — — 2 

Chemistry 3 3 3 

Zoology 3 3 3 

Botany 3 3 3 

.Geology and Soils 3 3 3 

Drawing 2 2 2 

Encyclopedia of Forestry 2 2 — 

Forest Surveying — — 3 

Sylviculture — — 2 

Practice in Forest Surveying — — 

Practice in Sylviculture — — 

Practice in Forestry 



SiicoND Year. 



Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Terra. 



,Forest- Mathematics 3 3 — 

Forest Surveying 3 3 3 

Forest Utilization — — 4 



1 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. I75 

Hours per week. 

I St Term, 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Forest Technology 3 3 — 

Sylviculture 222 

Forest Protection 3 3 3 

Forest Management — — 2 

Forest Politics — — 2 

Forest Laws 222 

Political Economy and Finance 2 2 2 

Outlines of Agriculture 2 2 — 

Practice in Forest Surveying 

Forest Technology (practical) — 

Practice in Sylviculture 

Practical Forestry, Excursions 

Third Year. 

Hours per week. 

I St Term. 2nd ferm. 3rd Terra. 

Forest Utilization .' 44 — 

Sylviculture 3 3 — 

Forest Management 3 3 — 

Political Economy and Finance 2 2 — 

Forest Politics 4 4 — 

Hunting 2 2 — 

Practical Sylviculture — 

Practice in Forest Management — — 

Practical Forestry, Excursions 



SUBSIDIARY COURSE IN VETERINARY MEDICINE 

First Year. 

Hours per week. 
I St Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Terra. 

Chemistry 3 3 3 

Anatomy and Histology 5 5 5 



176 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

Hrurs per week. 

istTenn. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Physiolog^y 544 

Pharmacology and Dispensin<^ 3 3 3 

Horse-Shoeing... 3 3 , — 

Operative Surgery ... — 3 3 

Anatomy (practical) 10 10 — 

Horse-Shoeing(practical) — — 6 

Second Year. 

H'"ufs npf week, 

ist Term. 2nd Temi. 3rd Temi. 

Zootechny — 3 3 

Pathology 4 4 4, 

Surgery 444 

Hoof Pathology — 3 — 

Animal Plagues — — 3 

Parasitology ,, 3 2 — 

Post-mortem Examination — — 2 

Veterinary Hygiene 3 — — 

Anatomy (practical) 10 10 — 

Horse- Shoeing (practical) 6 6 6 

Operative Surgery (practical) — 3 — 

Hospital Practice and Ambulatory 

Clinic — 6 15 

Dispensing 3 — — 

Third Year, 

Hcurs ofr week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3id Term. 

Zootechny 3 3 — 

Animal Plagues 2 2 — 

Veterinary Police 2 2 — 

Exterior of Domestic Animals 3 3 — 

Obstetrics 3 3 — 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 177 

Hours per week, 

ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Ophthalmology — 2 — 

Horse-Shoeing (practical) 6 6 — 

Post-mortem Examination (practical) 43 — • 
Hospital Practice and Ambulatory 

Clinic 15 15 

Management of Domestic Animals 

(practical) — — 



4. The academic year in the course of agriculture 
extends from September nth to September loth of the 
succeeding year. It is divided into three terms, the first 
extending from September nth to December 24th, the 
second from January 8th to March 31st, and the third from 
April 8th to September loth. 

5. In the course of agriculture, students are required 
to work on the farm during the third term. 

6. There is no Summer Vacation in the third term 
for students in the agricultural course ; but there may be a 
vacation not exceeding three weeks. 

7. Candidates for admission to these courses must be 
over seventeen years of age, of good moral character, and 
in good health. Candidates for admission to the agricul- 
tural course must own s cho or more of cultivated land, or 
must be the son or brother of one who owns the same. 

Those who intend to study at the expense of their 
/m, ken, gun, shi, chOy or so«, with the obligation to serve in 
it after graduation, may be allowed to try the entrance 
examination, on presenting a certificate from the local* 
authorities testifying to the above fact, without the quali- 
ficfition with regard to cultivated land. 
"^ 8. The entrance examinations are held in June. 



178 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

Candidates for admission to the agricultural course, who 
have passed satisfactory examinations, are only temporarily 
admitted, and are required to work directly on the farm. 
Those who have shown their earnestness for the farm 
work, and are fit for it, in physique, are admitted from 
September nth. 

9. Candidates for the first year class in any of the 
courses are required to pass satisfactory examinations in 
the following subjects : — 

1. Chinese. 

2. Composition in Sinico-Japanese. 

3. Dictation in Japanese. 

4. Japanese Geography. 

5. Arithmetic. 

6. Algebra (required only for candidates for admis- 

sion to the forestry course). 

10. The fee for the entrance examinations is 2 yen. 
The fee for attendance is 20 yen per academic year. 

11. In the course of agriculture and veterinary 
medicine, the students are examined at the end of the 
third year on the chief subjects studied during the previ- 
ous three years. In the course of veterinary medicine, 
the annual examination is not held at the end of the third 
year. 

12. In the course of agriculture, the term marks are 
determined by dividing by 2 the sum of the average term 
mark for the written or oral examinations and that for 
practical work. 

13. In the course of agriculture, the graduation 
mark is determined by dividing by 3 the sum of twice the 
average of the three years' marks and the average of the 
graduation examination marks. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. Ijg 

14. The regulations for graduation examinatipns and 
graduation in the course of veterinary medicine are appli- 
cable to the students in the subsidiary course of veterinary 
medicine. 

Pathological Anatomy is omitted from, and post 
mortem examination and practical management of domes- 
tic animals are added to, the list of the chief subjects 
mentioned under Art. 2 of the said regulations. 

15. The general regulations for the Colleges except 
the regulations about suspension of attendance are binding 
upon the students in the above courses unless special 
articles be provided for them. 



V. Farm, Nursery, Botanic Garden, Cattle &c. 

The College farm has an area of more than 28 cho. 
Of this area 15 cho are set apart and cultivated like an 
ordinary farm, to serve as a model in the study of profita- 
ble farming, and also as a field of practical work for students 
of the subsidiary classes in agriculture. 

About three cho have been set apart for the special use 
of professors and students in relation to experimental work 
and investigation. There are also various gardens for the 
cultivation of specimen technical crops, garden crops, 
forage-crops, and for fruit-trees. 

The Experimental farm for the department of Agricul- 
tural Chemistry was first established about the i8th year 
of Meiji ; and from about the 22nd year of Meiji various 
tecientific investigations have been made with metallic 
cylinders or wooden frames after the method of P. Wagner. 
The snbjects of investigation are various ; includ- 



l8o COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

ing special investigations with regard to plant-nutrition, 
manuring, composition of soil, mineral poison, nutri- 
tive qualities of various plant stuffs. Zinc cylinders 
and wooden frames are partly buried in the soil and 
so arranged and managed under natural conditions, that 
artificial influences should interfere as little as possible 
with the results of the experiments. The soils used are 
selected with the utmost care and preciseness. Pure 
chemical manures are used, sometimes mixed with arti- 
ficial manures ; these are moreover analysed every time 
before application, and certain fixed quantities are used ; 
the object being as far as possible to investigate scientific 
principles and to deduce therefrom the best methods of 
practically applying them. Various experiments have been 
going on already betv/een 6 and 7 years, A glass house is 
provided for water culture, and Wagner's pots are often 
used in this house for experiments in plant-nutrition. 

The nursery garden for forest trees has an acreage of 
over I. 3 cho. Seedlings of indigenous and exotic origin 
serve for practical instruction and experiment with regard 
to methods of propagation and rearing of nursery plants. 

There are over 200 kinds of indegenous trees and over 
40 kinds of Occidental and Australian trees worthy of intro- 
duction into Japan ; these are from time to time to be 
transplanted into our Kiyosumi forest. 

The garden for specimen trees serves also as a place 
for practical instruction in the culture of useful trees. At 
present, the garden has an acreage of over 1.4 cho and 
contains of indegenous kinds over 100 specimens, and of 
exotic kinds over 40. The specimen forest consists of the 
important forest trees and 0.1-0.2 cho are alloted for each 
kind, with which various trials with regard to growth of 



COLLEGE OP AGRICULTURE. l8l 

trees, pruritic thinning, sylviculture and utilization are 
made. The kinds of trees planted in this garden include 
Pinus Thunbergii Pari, (kuromatsu), Pinus densiflora S. et 
Z, (akamatsu), Populus tremula £. (yamanarashi), Crypto^ 
meria japonica Don. (sugi), Cham secy pans obtusa S. et Z. 
(hinoki), Chamsecyparis pisifera Sw et Z. (sawara), Quercus 
glandulifera BL (konara), Magnolia hypoleuca S. et Z. 
(h6noki), Juglans Sieboldiana Maxim, (kurumi), Pterocarya; 
rhoifolia S. et Z. . (sawagurumi), Zelkowa acuminata PL 
(keyaki), PheUodendron amurense Rupr. (kiwada), Rhus 
succedanea L. (haze), Quercus acuta Thunh. (akagashi), 
Quercus vibrayena Fr. et Sav. (shirakashi), Pinua Korai- 
ensis S. et Z. (chosenmatsu), Certidiphyllum japonicum S. 
et Z. (katsura), Diopyros Lotus L. (mamegaki), Platycarya 
strobilacea S. et Z. (nobunoki). Unfortunately more space 
could not be spared for this valuable garden in the college 
land ; and arrangements are being made to establish a 
branch garden .in our Kiyosumi forest. 

The Botanic garden has an area of i cho ; and is 
separated into two parts, a division for systematic culture, 
and a division for useful plants* In the systematic garden' 
the classification of Bentham and Hooker has been adopted ; 
and this part contains the division allotted to about loao 
fTpecies of indigenous plants. The division allotted to 
useful plants is subdivided into 12 compartments. In 
these are cultivated plants for dye-stuffs, for medicine, 
plants yielding starch, roots and timbers, vegetables raised 
for the sake of their leaves, vegetables raised for their 
fkywers, plants furnishing condiments and spices, plants 
yielding fruits, plants good for fodder, plants yielding fibre, 
poisonous plants, and misceUaneous specimens; the whole 
containing about 500 species both exotic and iilidigeaotis*' 



l82 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. : 

Besides the garden, 0.13 cho of land is allotted for rare 
and valuable plants, about 600 species being planted 
in pots. There is also 0.05 ch6 devoted to mume (Prunus 
mume), the garden containing 60 varieties. We have, 
besides, two glass houses, large and small to protect plants 
from warm districts during winter. 

Live stocks are specially kept as specimens, but are at. 
the same time used for practical instruction. In connec- 
tion with such instruction, studies and experiments are 
made in the manufacture of various animal products. 
There are at present 23 head of horses and cattle, 30 of 
sheep and pigs ; besidies various kinds of poultry. 



VI. Laboratories^ Museums &c, . 

The laboratory of the Agricultnral chemistry depart-' 
ment is chiefly used for quantitative analysis by the students 
of the department.. There are instruments and apparatus 
for mechanical analysis of soils, for quantitative analysis 
of food stuffs, of tea, sake, wine, beer, milk, shOyu, drinking 
water, irrigation water, &c ; for water culture, for pure 
culture of yeast and fungi ; for manufacture of agricultural 
products ; for estimation of digestion coefficients ar>d- 
nutritive ratio of fodder stuffs, &c. J 

The laboratory of forestry is used for investigation and* 
practical instruction with regard to the manufacture of; 
various forest products. It is furnished with apparatus for- 
dry distillation of woods, distillation of camphor &c. The 
principal specimens include 30 kinds of charcoal and rts. 
bye-products, wood tar and starch obtained from the nuts: 
of various trees &c. . 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 183 

The museum of agriculture contains grains, fruits, 
vegetables, seeds, specimens preserved in alcohol, models 
of wax and plaster, drawings, technical crops and their 
manufactured products, horticultural specimens and speci- 
mens of zootechny, samples relating to the silk industry, 
besides various specimens of oriental and occidental farm 
implements &c. arranged in groups. 

The museum of forestry contains implements, native 
and foreign, for the felling and planting of trees and the 
transportation of timber, of which there are over 70 kinds. 
It also contains some 200 drawings and photographs, 
all serving for the practical instruction in forest utilization 
and sylviculture. There are also over 300 specimens of 
timber obtained from various noted districts. Seeds of 
forest trees are also kept as specimens. 

in the Zoological Laboratory, the students of Agricul- 
ture and Forestry follow practical courses in Zoology and 
Entomology. The Entomological specimens collected or 
purchased for use in these studies, and kept in the Labora- 
tory, now amount to about 11,090, of which number about 
1000 species are for'sign. Besides these, a special collection 
of insects, classed as useful or injurious, and bred in the 
Institution, has been made. This includes 500 species. 
There is also a collection of silkworm cocoons, both Japa- 
nese and foreign, representing upwards of 300 varieties. 

Some insects are bred in the insect-houses for the 
study of morphological and physiological problems in 
entomology ; but special attention is given to insects 
known as injurious or useful in farms, gardens, forests, &c., 
with a view to such study of their life-histories as may 
enable the best measures to be adopted towards their cul- 
tivation or extirpation. For these investigations insects 



184 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

are bred indoors and also out-of-doors. Those kept indoors 
are placed in separate breeding-boxes ; and those raised in 
the open air are confined within fixed limits by frames of fine 
wire netting. Within these frames are raised those plants 
forming the favorite nourishment of the insects under 
investigation. 

There are four buildings for the study of silkworm cul- 
ture connected with the Laborator3^ These contain all 
necessary apparatus for experiments and investigations. 
Each building contains a room for leaf-cutting, several 
rooms for silkworm-breeding, and a sleeping-room for the 
guardian. One of these buildings is a gift from the Ghiisa- 
gata-gori Co-operative Society for the Promotion of Silk- 
worm Culture in Nagano. It was given in April, 1896, 
and contains, besides such rooms as those above mentioned, 
two extra-rooms for special work in the investigation of 
the pebrine disease, the most formidable existing obstacle 
to silkworm culture. 

The Botanical Laboratory is devoted to the study of 
the morphology and pathology of plants. It is used by the 
students of Agriculture and Forestry, and contains several 
hundred herbariums of forest-flora, and a large variety of 
specimens showing different pathological conditions of 
plants. 

The Veterinary Department is furnished with labora- 
tories, and all apparatus relating to the necessary studies 
in regard to anatomy, histology, pathology, pathological 
anatomy, and hygiene, and a forge. 

The collections of veterinary specimens include those 
illustrating anatomy, histology, pathology, pathologica 
anatomy, hygiene and horse-shoeing; all arranged in the 
lecture-rooms or laboratories of the respective sections. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 185 

Specimens belonging to the anatomical section include 
anatomical drawings, models of horse- viscera, of hoofs, and 
of the organs of the special senses (all these being imported 
from Europe), also skeletons of all domestic animals, 
alcoholic and dry preparations. These latter have been 
prepared by the professor of Anatomy. Amoug these 
preparations, are the colored division of head bones ; models 
of ligaments, muscles, bowels, internal ear, and of arteries; 
models of transverse sections of anterior and posterior ex- 
tremities ; and models of the topographic anatomy of the 
extremities &c. Many of them are highly instructive, having 
been made for the first lime in this country. Besides these, 
there are upwards of 500 histological specimens. 

The specimens relating to horse-shoeing are hoofs, 
drawings illustrating the position of the bones of the horse 
in variaus attitudes and while in motion ; also normal shoes 
from various parts of Europe, America, China and Corea; 
shoes for diseased hoofs, winter-shoes, abnormal hoofs &c. 
in all upwards of 200 specimens. There is also a set of his- 
torical specimens of horse-shoes dating from antiquity 
down to the present time, collected and prepared by the 
professor of this department. 

In the pharmacological, hygienic and breeding sec- 
tions, which are under one professor, there is a collection 
of feeding stuffs and pharmacological specimens. To these 
sections are attached a pharmacy and a botanical garden. 
Among specimens of food-stuffs, are included cereals, seeds 
of grasses, and samples of fodder, 2*1 o in number; of the 
pharmacological specimens nearly 80 were collected es- 
pecially for the sections. The botanical garden is divided 
into two sections, one for forage, the other for medicinal 
plants. Each section is subdivided according to the natural 



l86 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

classification ; Japanese and foreign forages, toxic and 
medicinal plants, being cultivated therein. 

Specimens relating to breeding include models of 
typical stalls, models exhibiting the points of eminent 
races of horses and cattle, their atlas, &c. ; with samples of 
different kinds of hay and pasture-grasses. 

The pathological institute is furnished with all instru- 
ments and utensils necessary in the study of bacteriology ; 
and pathologico-anatomical preparations illustrating con- 
tagious and infectious [diseases, specimens showing de- 
formities and new formations, and disorders of the various 
organs ; -the number of parasitic specimens is over loo ; and 
of the pathologico-histological specimens more than i,ooo. 



VII. Veterinary Hospital. 

The veterinary hospital is situated in the grounds of 
the College of Agriculture, and all kinds of sick animals are 
there admitted. 

The hospital is divided into three parts. The first 
building is a large stable for horses, cattle, sheep, and 
pigs, — provided with 8 loose-boxes, 12 stalls and capable 
of admitting 20 patients. An operation-hall and a con- 
sultation-room is attached to it. 

The second building is a clinic for smaller patients, 
including dogs, cats and poultry ; it contains a consulta- 
tion-room, an operation-room, and a room for internal and 
external clinics, and can admit 40 patients. 

The third building is a special stable situated in a 
remote part of the college ground for animals suffering 
from infectious diseases. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE,. I8.7 

All necessarey instrument and apparatus for internal 

pathology and therapy, surgery obstetrics, ophthalmology 

dentistry and hoof- pathology are furnished, including 

"TTiicroscopes (some of the best of Zeiss's instruments), 

ophthalmoscopes, a shino-laryngoscope, instruments f6t 

.theexamination of urine, thermokanter, electric apparatus, 

-disinfecting apparatus, and aseptic instruments etc. 

*' Polyclinics are kept every day, (except Sundays and 

holidays,) from lo A. M« to 12 M. ; allowance being made 

•for urgent cases. The admission fee for a large patient pro 

Viie is 50 sen, and that for a smaller patient pro die is 20 

sen. In the case of animals belonging to the poorest 

classes, treatment is not charged. 

• Ambulatory clinics are kept as time allows ; the owner 
of the patient has to pay the travelling expense. 

Horses are shod and clipped in the forge ; the charge 
*foi- special shoeing is one yen ; for common shoeing, 50 
^efi*; — poor farmers being charged only half of this amount. 



VlII- Pomological Garden in Daishigawara. 

* This garden having an area of j.4 cho, is situated in 
Shimokawara, Daishigawaramura^ Tachibana gun, Kana- 
gawa prefecture. Various fruit trees are cultivated as 
specimens here, the college farm in Komaba not being 
suited for the culture of fruit trees. This garden was 
'Established in the 25th year of Melji. 



L 



1 88 GOLLEGB OP AGR1CULTURB. 

IX. The Kiyosaxni Forest in Awa Province. 

The Kiyosumi forest attached to the College occupies 
the southern aspect of Myoken mountain in Awa province 
where the famous temple Seich6ji stands. The forest, 
comprising an Area of over 336 chd is situated about 3 
miles north of Amatsucho, on the southern coast of the 
province, artd its highest point has an elevation above the 
sea of 350 meters. The forest zone belongs to that of 
evergreen broad-leaved trees, and the most important forest 
trees here to be found are Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica, 
Don.) and Momi (Abies firma, S. et Z.) The former has 
been all artificially created, and though not yet made good 
with regard to age-gradation, the pure woods of better 
quality extend over 67 ch5, and the oldest of them attains 
over 100 years of age. The latter being naturally created 
occurs as a pure wood or the over wood of coppice woods 
with standards. The pure wood of momi, which is 90 years 
old, exceeds not more than 5 cho in area, but in quality it 
ranks high amongst the woods of the same kinds in 
our country. The coppice woods altogether comprise an 
area of 66 cho, and are composed of over 70 species of 
forest trees both evergreen and deciduous, among which Ara- 
kashi (Quercus glauca, Thunb.), Akagashi (Quercus acuta, 
Thunb.), and Konara (Quercus glandulifera, Bl.) are note- 
worthy. The remaining portion of the forest comprises the 
mixed woods of conifer and broad-leaved trees, and incom- 
pletely stocked surfaces or blanks. Also many of the first 
mentioned are far from normal state in stocking. 

At present, the total volume of wood throughout the 
entire forest is estimated at 14,000 shakujime (about 4,667 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 189 

cub. m.) for conifers, and 3,500 tana (about 14,000 cub. 
m.) for broad -leaved trees. 

Since this forest has come under the control of the 
College, a systematical method of management has been 
introduced to provide a model forest for practical work, and 
at the same time to serve the purpose of investigation and 
instruction as well as to make the public acquainted with 
the systematic management of forests. With these objects 
in view roads were projected through the district, and the 
necessary triangular and poligonometrical surveys have 
been carried out. The total district has been marked of 
into 15 divisions according to its general feature and also 
into many subdivisions made with regard to the condi- 
tions of forest-growth. These divisions, again, have been 
marked off and serially arranged with regard to cutting; 
and the annual cutting and other forestry business will be 
determined according to a working plan. 

Also a lot of woodland in the forest with an area of 
about 4 cho, where no cutting has ever been done, is 
protected against the axe in order to preserve a fine 
specimen of primeval forest and to afford some illustrative 
aid to sylvicultural study. 



X. Regulations for Volunteer Farm Labourers. 

1. Those who are desirous of obtaining practical 
knowledge of farm operations are admitted to work in the 
College as Volunteer Farm Labourers. 

2. Candidates must be over 20 years of age, of good 
health, so as to be able to stand ordinary farm work, and 
able to stay three years in the College. 



igo COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. 

3. Candidates for admission as volunteer farm labour- 
ers are required to present a written application in accord- 
ance with the forms prescribed. 

4. Candidates admitted to the College are required 
to present a declaration in accordance with forms prescribed 
and signed by two sureties. 

5. Sureties must be male house-holders above twenty- 
one years of age, living within the juridiction of the 
Tokyo Fu administration, or such other persons as 
the Director of ths College may deem suitable or trust 
worthy. 

When a surety is absent from his fixed residence for 
any length of time, he must, before his departure, state his 
intention to be absent, and provide a representative hav- 
ing power of attorney. 

6. If the Director of the College deem a surety or 
his representative unsuitable, another person possessing 
the necessary qnalifications must be speedily found. 

7. If a surety dies or loses any of the necessary 
qualifications, he must at once be replaced, and a new 
written declaration must be signed by his successor. 

8. Ten volunteer farm labourers shall be admitted at 
present. 

9. No remuneration is given to the volunteer farm 
labourers for their labour on the farm. 

10. Volunteer farm labourers are under the control 
of the foremen of the farm and other authorities connected 
therewith. 

11. Voluuteer farm labourers must wear light attire, 
suitable for farm work, while they are on the farm. 

12. If volunteer farm labourers are prevented by ill- 
ness or otherwise, from going out to work, they must, 



^ 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE. I9I 

before the work bsgins, submit a nots, stating the reason 
thereof to the foremen. 

13. Volunteer farm labourers, for whom no hope of 
success is entertained, either on account of illness, mis- 
conduct, or frequent absence, under any pretext, will be 
dismissed from the farm. 

14. If a volunteer farm labourer, at the end of three 
years, shows an aptitude for farm operations, a certificate 
of proficiency will be granted to him. 

15. If a volunteer farm labourer shows proficiency 
in farm work, he may be allowed to leave the farm with 
the certificate thereof, even before the expiration of the 
prescribed time. 



XVII. UNIVERSITY HALL. 



GENERAL REGULATION'S. 

I. — Applicants for admission to the University Hall 
are required to present to the President of the University a 
written apph'cation, setting forth the subject of investiga- 
tion to be pursued ; and they will not be admitted unless 
they have shown their proficiency in previous studies, 
and can produce satisfactory testimonials of good moral 
character, subject to the approval of the University 
council. 

If such applicants be not graduates of one of the Col- 
leges, the degree of their proficiency in previous studies 
will be determined by a special examination. 

2. — The President shall, on consulting with the 
Director of the College to which the subject of investiga- 
tion chosen by any student properly belongs, appoint a 
Professor or Professors to superintend the student's studies ; 
and all scientific investigations carried on by the student 
must be made under this professorial supervision. 

3. — A student at the University Hall must pursue, 
during two years immediately following his admission, 
some one of the post-graduate courses established by the 
College which is in the line of his previous studies, and to 
which the subject chosen by him belongs. 

4. — A student of the University Hall shall be at liberty 
to ofl'er himself for the University degree in his branch of 
study after a period of five years has elapsed from his 




i 



UNIVERSITY HALL. I93 

admission into the Hall. In such case the President shall 
appoint a special Examining Committee to test the effici- 
ency of the candidate. 

5. — A student who by reason of misconduct, idleness, 
or chronic illness, is considered by the President unfit to 
continue his course of study, will be dismissed from the 
University Hall. 

6. — Students of the University Hall are exempted from 
the payment of tuition fees. 



ADMISSION. 

I. — A graduate of any one of the Colleges, who desires 
to be admitted to the University Hall, is required to present 
to the President, through the Director of his College, a 
written application in accordance with the prescribed form. 

2. — An applicant for admission, not a graduate of any 
of the Colleges, is required to present to the President a 
written application in accordance with the prescribed form, 
together with a written statement of his previous studies, 
and also with a certificate as mentioned in the following 
article, if he have any such, on or before March 31st in 
each year. 

3. — An applicant, not a graduate of any of the Colleges 
is required to undergo an entrance examination, as pre- 
scribed in the regulations of the University Hall, and unless 
he be a graduate of the preparatory course to the Univer- 
sity in a Higher School or of a Higher Middle School hav- 
ing a course similar to the above preparatory course or of 
some other institution recognized by the Minister of State 



.194 UNIVERSITY HALL. 

for Education as having a sinnilar course of instruction, he 
must also pass the examination for preliminary education 
required of entrants of the Colleges. 

4. — Applicants such as are mentioned in Article 2, are 
required to pay an examination fee of thirty yen to the i 

University, with the understanding that the fee shall be j 

returned, should the applicant withdraw his name before | 

the date fixed for the examinations. 

5. — All students admitted to the University Hall are 
required to take the prescribed oath and to sign their 
names in the University Hall Register. 



XVni. LIBRARY OP THE IMPERIAL 

UNIVERSITY. 



The University Library was removed, in July 1893, ^^ 
the present building, which was completed in August 1892. 
It contains a spacious reading room for students, capable 
of seating about three hundred readers, a reading room for 
the University staff, a smoking room, and offices, in ad- 
dition to a three storied book-repository, which is divided 
into nine apartments. The reading rooms* are provided 
with a card catalogue and several printed catalogues. The 
Library now contains about two hundred and seventeen 
thousand volumes. By purchase, donations and exchanges 
chiefly from abroad, a large addition is annually made to 
the Library. 

r I 

REGULATIONS OF THE LIBRARY. 

I. — The University Library is the place established for 
the safe keeping of all books belonging to the University 
Hall and the five Colleges. 

2. — No person is admitted into the Libray to look for 
books or to take them out or remove them from the shelves, 
except he be an officer of the Library. 

3. — Books for class use in the Institutes of the Colleges 

and for official use in the University offices can be bprrow- 

. ed by a Secretary, in the case of the University, or by the 

Director of each College or by the Professor or Instructor 

. in charge of each Institute, in the case of the Colleges. 



igS LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 

4. — The Secretary, Professor, or Instructor is held res- 
ponsible for the books lent from the Library, in accordance 
with the foregoing article, but the officers of the Library 
will examine them, from time to time, in order to see after 
their condition. 

5. — A Professor or Assistant- professor is entitled ta 
have in his possession, as books of reference, not more 
than thirty volumes at one time, and any other member of 
the teaching staff is entitied to have not more than ten^ 
volumes at one time. 

6. — The staff of the University, other than those men- 
tioned in Article 5, may borrow books to the number of not 
more than fiye volumes at one time, subject to the approval 
of the President, 

7. — The number of volumes being estimated, after 
books bound in European style, three volumes bound in 
Japanese style and one sheet of maps, pictures and the like 
in the form of a chart, or one case of the same in the form 
of a case, are counted as equal to one volume in European 
style ; and in the case of periodicals or pamphlets publish- 
ed in parts and to be bound in one volume after the issue 
of a certain number, the numbers of such publications 
which make up one complete volume are counted as one 
volume. 

8. — Any person who, on account of urgent necessity, 
asks permission to take out books from the Library, may 
be allowed so to do by special permission of the President ; 
such request to be granted only when considered reason- 
able. 

9. — Library books, when not otherwise in use, may be 
lent, on request, to Government offices. 

10. — Any person who desires to take out books from 



LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Ig7 

the Library must first deliver a slip duly signed, contain- 
ing the title, shelf-mark and number of the book desired, 
and the date of borrowing the same. 

Printed slips, to be used for this purpose, are provided 
in the Library. 

II. — Students who are unable to supply themselves 
with text-books, may borrow them from the Library, upon 
presenting the certificate of the Professor or Instructor for 
whose class the book is required. 

12. — Books borrowed from the Library must in no 
case be lent to any other person by the borrower, and no 
person is allowed to borrow more than one copy of the 
same book, except for class use in the Institutes or for 
official use in the University offices. 

13. — All books borrowed from the Library must be 
returned during the first ten days of July in each year, or 
whenever the Librarian demands their return. 

14. — During the summer vacation, a student may bor- 
row text-books to the number of not more than five 
volumes, upon presenting the necessary certificates from 
his Professor or Instructor, and all the books thus borrow- 
-ed must be returned before the 5th of September. 

15. — When a Professor or other member of the Univer- 
sity staff retires from his position, or when a student leaves 
the University, he must immediately return the books 
which he has borrowed. A new graduate is also required 
to return any books he may have borrowed from the Lib- 
rary, before he receives the certificate for graduation. 

16. — The reading-rooms are open daily, except on Holi- 
days, between the hours of 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. ; but for the 
peiriod from November ist to April 30th the hour of open- 



198 LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 

ing is 30 minutes later. On Sundays the rooms are opened 
at 6 p.m. and closed at 9 p. m. 

17. — During the winter vacation, the reading-rooms, 
are open from the 25th to the 28th of December and from 
the 4th to the 7th of January, between the hours of 7.30' 
a.m. and 9 p.m., Sundays excepted ; and during the sum- 
mer vacation they are open from the nth to the 30th o£ 
July and from the 22nd of August to the 10th of Septem- 
ber, between the hours of 8 a. m. and 12 noon, Sundays 
excepted. 

18. — Every applicant for books for immediate perusal 
in the reading-rooms must present to the officer in charge 
a slip duly singed, containing the title, shelf-mark and 
number of any book or books he may require, and the date 
of borrowing, in exchange for which slip the book or books 
shall be delivered to the applicant. All such books, when 
done with, must be promptly returned. 

19. — A ticket for admission to the reading-rooms may 
be given to any one of the following persons ; special per- 
mission, however, is required for admission into the Library 
or the rooms in which books are placed : — 

1. Former Professors and other members of the 
University staff who have been in sei*vice for more 
than two years. 

2. Graduates of the University Hall and the 
Colleges. 

3. Those who have been elective students in one 
of the Colleges and whose admission to the 
reading room has been approved at the Faculty 
meeting of their respective Colleges. 

4. Persons who desire to use books in the reading' 
rooms on official business, and for whom special 



LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. I99 

permission from the University so to do has been 
asked by the Government offices to which they 
belong. 
5. Persons of superior attainments in learning 
under special circumtances that are a^cceptable 
in the case. 
20. — Professors and Instructors are admitted into the 
Library to look foi books, and any officer of the University 
has the same privilege when official business requires. 

21. — The following students, when provided with ad- 
mission tickets, are admitted into the Library to look for 
books ; — 

1. Students of the University Hall, and of the post- 
graduate courses. 

2. Students of the highest classes of the Colleges 
who have certificates from their respective profes- 
sors entitling them to this privilege. 

3. Students of the College of Law (only into the 
Library of Law and Political Science). 

4. Graduates of any College of the University, 
provided that not more than six persons are 
admitted at one time. » 

When a student or a graduate desires admittance into 
the Library for this purpose, he is required to give to the 
officer in charge of the reading-rooms, a ticket with which 
he has been previously provided, which ticket will be return- 
ed to him by the same officer when coming out ; and 
when he has found the book or books desired, he must 
immediately come ont of the Library and consult the book 
or books in comformity with Article i8. 

22. — Those who are admitted into the Library are re- 
quired, while there, to refrain from disarranging the books 



200 LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 

or from offering any impediment to the officer in charge of 
the reading-rooms. 

23. — Books delivered to any person for immediate 
perusal must not be taken out of the reading-rooms, unless 
the proper steps have been taken for borrowing them. 

24. — Books for use in the reading-rooms are divided 
into the following four classes : — 

1. Valuable books. 

2. Books of reference for the common use of all the 
established courses. 

3. Books specially placed in the reading-rooms, at 
the request of a Professer or Instructor, for the 
use of his class. 

4. Books riot belonging to any of the above classes. 

25. — No one is allowed, unless by special permission of 
the President, to use the books belonging to the first class, 
except those to whose subject of study the books relate. 
In case the books are taken ont of the Library by special 
permission for official use, they must be returned on the 
same day on which they are borrowed. 

26. — No book ibelonging to the second class shall be 
taken out except by special permission of the President. 

27. — No book belonging to the third class shall be 
taken out except by the Professor or Instructur to whose 
subject of study the book relates, unless by special permis- 
sion of the President. 

28. — Books belonging to the fourth class may be taken 
out for not more than four weeks. 

29. — Except when required for class or official use, no 
periodical shall be taken out of the reading-rooms, until 
sixty days have elapsed since it was received at the Library. 



leofall::^ 



-rooms 



•y. LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY. 20l 

n charge • 30. — Nothing shall be brought into the reading-rooms 

except books, papar, pen or ink. 
immefli^ 31. — Loud talking, reading aloud, discussion, smok- 

es, unir' Jng and anything of a nature to disturb readers, are for- 
thcm. ' bidden in the reading-rooms, 
ire div:-: 32. — If any book in the hands of a borrower be lost, he 

must replace it with another of the same edition and of 

equal value, or pay a proper price in lieu thereof as the 

case may be. 

33. — If any book in the hands of a borrower be damag- 

ecf, he shall make good the damage or shall replace the 

book with another of the same edition and of equal value, 
r> »^^ " as the case may be. 

34. — If any book borrowed for class or official use be 
c clasip j^g^ Qj, damaged, the borrower shall report to the Librari- 
tiiss0-. an the facts in detail. 

irstclasi' Art. 32. or 33 may be applied to the case as circum- 

ks rek^' stances may require. 

y sp^^'"^ 35* — -^ person, who violates any of the foregoing 

jdont''^ regulations, is deprived of the privilege of admittance into 

the reading-rooms, or of the privilege of borrowing any 

sbal'^ book whatever (all books in his hands being called in), or 

[jeflt- is deprived of both privileges, for a period of not less than 

sjiall ^ a week and not more than a year, according to the nature 

of the case. 





pcflBi^ The case of a Professor or other member of the 

University staff who violates the rules is dealt with by the 

igtal^i^ President. 

I 36. — ^When any person neglects to return at the 

^,t' required time any book borrowed, and does not return it 

flCC after having been notified by the Librarian, his case is 

i\/i^''.- dealt with by the proper authorities. 



I 
f 

^ 

I 

L 



"^ 



202 LIBRARY OF THE IMPERIAL UNIVfeRSlTV. 



APPENDIX TO THE REGULATIONS. 

1. All the regulations of the Library above mentioned, 
excepting Articles 14 and 21, are applicable to elective 
students. 

2. Elective students shall receive the benefit of Art. 
11 of the same regulations after the regular students have 
been served. 



FEES FOR TICKETS OF ADMISSION TO THE 

READING-ROOMS. 

I. — Any person receiving a ticket of admission to the 
reading-rooms in accordance with Article ig of the Library 
Regulations, candidates referred to in § 2 of this Article 
being excepted, shall pay a fee of one yen for each term, or 
any part of a current term of the academic year. It is 
understood that the first term shall include the days taken 
up by the w^inter vacation ; the second term, the spring 
vacation, the third term, the summer vacation. 

2. — The above fee is to be paid at the time when the 
ticket for admission is received. 

3. — Tickets for admission are not available for more 
than one term, and holders desiring a continuance of the 
privilage, are required to renew the ticket at the end of 
each term. 



r '. 



XIX. DORMITORIES, RECREATION AND 
PHYSICAL EXERCISES. 



RESIDENCE AND DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS. 

Each course in the diflferent colleges, or each class, or, 
when convenient, two combined, shall constitute different 
groups, called Bn. A limited number of post-graduates and 
students of the different Colleges who desire to live in the 
Dormitories, shall be admitted to residence. Professors, 
Assistant Professors, or graduates serving as Assistants 
may be permitted to reside in the Dormitories. 

The members of each Bu shall elect one of their num- 
ber by vote, and the said member, with the approval of the 
President, shall be appointed headman of the Bu, or Bukdu. 
He shall be responsible for the preservation of order in the 
group, and shall also generally represent it, the term of 
office being one year, commencing on the 2Qth of September. 

All official notices are transmitted through the Bukan, 
and applications made by the whole Bn, or any member of 
the Bn, must be addressed through the Bukan ; or else the 
applicant must receive a warrant note of recognition from 
him. 

In c^ses where the Superintendent of a Dormitory 
desires to enforce -some regulation which concerns the 
ivhole Dormitory, either on his own authority, or with the 
permission of the higher authority, as well as in cases 
■where the whole residents in the Dormitories have any 
application to make to the Superintendent, a meeting of 



DORMITORIES, RECREATION, ETC. 

all the Bukan shall be held, and the matter shall be de-' 
cided by a majority of votes. In the former case, the 
Superintendent shall act as chairman, and in the latter 
case, the Bukan shall elect a chairman by vote from among 
theniselves. 

The Bukanship is an honorary office and cannot be re- 
fused for private reasons or individual convenience. When 
^ there are many applications for admission to the Dormitories, 
and t^hen accordingly a selection is necessary, the number 
' of applicants from the dififerent colleges shall be selected 
according to some proportion, and thereafter granted the 
requisite permission. In cases where the competing ap- 
plicants belong to the same college, those belonging to a 
higher class shall havq the preference. The post-graduates 
have also a priority over the students. 

All inquiries, applications, and complaints regarding 
matters connected with the residence of students, should be 
addressed to the Superintendent. 

Students are required to wear the College uniform, and 
must wear the same in a decent and orderly manner. 

Students who enter or leave Dormitories are required 
to sign their names in the Dormitory Register. 

The sureties of a student who have signed the required 
declarattion at the time of his admission to his college, are 
responsible in all matters connected with his residence in 
the Dormitory. 

Students are required to keep their rooms clean and 
tidy. 

Students are forbidden to bring into the Dormitories,' 
or keep therein, any intoxicating liquors, or any article 
prejudical to good order and decency, or to smoke tobaccp 
in ihe : bedrooms. 



DORMITORIES) RECREATION, ETC. 205 

Slut3ents may, when they have finished their day work 
at the College, go outside of the University gates on pri- 
vate business until 8 o'clock p.m., and until lo o'clock on 
the night before any Holiday. On Holidays, students are 
at liberty to go outside of the gates from morning until the 
hour fixed for returning to the Dormitory. 

A Student who, having gone outside of the University 
gates, returns to the Dormitory later than the appointed 
hour, must submit a note, explaining the reason of the de- 
lay; and no student is allowed to enter the University 
gates after ii o'clock p.m. 

A student who is obliged to stay out a whole night by 
any circumstance must submit to the Superintendent, be- 
fore 10 o'clock of the next morning, a note stating the facts. 

Any student, who is desirous of leaving his Dormitory, 
or of staying out for a night on account of urgent business, 
must apply in person for leave from the Superintendent 
stating his reasons. 

A student suffering from a slight attack of illness may 
receive medical attendance in the Dormitory, and may 
remain in his own room for one week, but in cases where 
his sickness is of a serious nature or is infectious, or 
contagious, notice shall be given to his sureties, to remove 
him either to any outside lodging-house or to the Hospital 
belonging to the College of Medicine. 

A student suffering from illness is not permitted to take 
meals in his room, without permission from the Super- 
intendent, acting under advice of the Medical officer. 

All notifications are presumed to be universally known 
after the lapse of two days. 

Any student who fails to observe the regulations and 
notices from time to time, or who is guilty of misconduct, 



2o6 DORMITORIES, RECREATION, ETC. 

shall be either prohibited from going outside of the Univ- 
ersity gates for a certain number of days, or be expelled 
from the Dormitories, or from the University, as the nature 
of his case requires. Where the student expelled from the 
Dormitory happens to be an honour student or a holder of 
a loan scholarship, he is deprived of such honour or 
scholarsoip. 

RECREATION AND PHYSICAL EXERCISES. 

An enclosure has been set apart in the centre of the 
University grounds at Ilongo, for the purpose of recrea- 
tion, and is now provided with all the requisites for outdoor 
sports. The University boat-house stands on the east bank 
of the River Sumida, at Mukojima. Its upper floor, com- 
manding an extensive view of the river, is specially arranged 
for the accommodation of visitors at the annual regattas. 

The Teikoku Daigaku Undokwai^ University Exercise 
Club, organized under the patronage of the President of 
the University, receives in several ways, aid from the 
University. Its current expenses are met by the subscrip- 
tions of its menbers, and of Professors and others of the 
University Staff who are not members. The President of 
the University is ex-officio President of the Club. Profes- 
sors and all other members of the University Staff, and 
graduates and students of the University Hall and the five 
Colleges, are eligible for membership in the Club. 

The club holds two large annual gatherings, one in 
the University grounds for athletic sports and other physi- 
cal exercises in the autumn, and one for a regatta on the 
River Sumida in the spring. 

During the summer vacation, students are trained in 






DORMITORIES, RECREATION, ETC. lOTJ 

swimming, under the superintendence of a competent 
teacher, in the River Sumida below the Ryogoku Bridge or 
at Zushi at Miura-gun in the Province of Sagami. 

Arrangements have been made for rooms, in the build- 
ing adjoining the Dormitories, suitable for the holding of 
meetings by the various literary and scientific societies. 






I 



XX. LIST OF STUDENTS. 



L University Hall- 

KAMETARO NAKANISHI, Igakushi. 

General Internal Phathology, and Anatomical and Histological 

Changes of the Nervous System in Kakhe. 
SHITARO KAWAI, Ringakushi. 

Sylviculture in Japan and Forest Utilization. 
YOSHITO TAKANE, HOgakushi. 

Commercial Law (especially Laws of Bills of Exchange^ Partnership 

and Companies), 
MITSU INOUYE, HOgakushi. Japanese Constitution^ 

CHIUDA ITO, KOgakushi. Japanese Architecture, 

SENSABURO TACHIBANA, Bungakushi. Modern Philosophy. 

YAICHI HAGA, Bungakushi. 

History and Methodology of Japanese Literature. 
HISASHI KIMURA, Rigakushi. Practical Astronomy. 

KIUTARO MIYAMOTO, Rigakushi. Wave Motion, 

SEIJI NAKAMURA, Rigakushi. Electricity and Radiation, 

TSUNENOBU FUJITA, Rigakushi. Embryology of Mollusca. 

KENJIRO FUJII, Rigakushi. Morphology of Conifers, 

YOROZU OTA, HOgakushi. 

Principles of Administrative Justice {Historical and Comparative), 
TSUNEJIRO HONDO, Igakushi. Medicine in General and Kakke. 

NAYETARO TANAKA, Igakushi. 

General Surgery and Trephining in Wounds of the Skull. 
JINICHIRO MATSUNAMI, HOgakushi. Maritime Law. 

KAMEMATSU NIHO, HOgakushi. Jurisprudence. 

TOKICHI YEN DO. Kogakushi. Railroads in Civil Engineering, 

YUMIZO SUGEMURA, Kogakushi. Railroads in Civil Engineering. 
JIN INAGAKI, Kogakushi. Civil Engineering (Water-Supply of Cities). 
KANAME OTSUKA, Kogakushi. 

Mechanical Engineering (Spinning and Weaving). 



\ 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 209 

BUNZABURO MATSUMOTO, Bungakushi. 

Relation between Metaphysics and Epistemology, 

MATATARO MATSUMOTO, Bungakushi. Theory of Perception. 

YASUSABURO YONEYAMA, Bungakushi. Study on Space. 

MATAJIRO WATANABE, Bungakushi. 

Sociological Study of Morality. 

HISATO KIKUCHI. Bungakushi. 

Historical Development of the Japanese Language from the Nara 

Period to that of Heian. 

AGU SAITO, Bungakushi. 

Commercial Relations between jfapan and Holland in the Times of 

Tokugawa* 
SUMIO NAKAZAWA, Bungakushi. 

I'Af History of the Later Period of Ashikaga Shogunate, 

HOSAKU IWAOKA, Rigakushi. Physics [Forms of MulecuUs). 

TOYOTARO KAMIYA, Rigakushi. 

Constitution of Ammonia Compounds of Selenious and Sulphurous 

Oxides. 

GITOKU TASHIRO, Igakushi. 

Pathology and Treatment of Leprosy from a Surgical point of view. 

MITSUO NAWA, KOgakushi. Railroads in Civil Engineering. 

KOROKU KOMURA, KOgakushi. Metallurgy of Iron. 

YASUSHI TSUKAMOTO, Kogakushi. Architectural Decoration. 

SANTARO OKAMATSU, HOgakushi. Obligation, 

•TAMESABURO TAMAKI, HOgakushi. 

Principles of the Law of Insurance. 

ICHIRO HARUKI, H5gakushi. History of Roman Law. 

KOTARO SHIDA, Hogakushi. 

Laws relating to Insurance and Companies. 

SHINGO NAKAMURA, HOgakushi.- Treaties. 

GIICHI SOYESHIMA. HOgakushi. 

Principles of the Constitution of the Japanese Empire. 

SAKUYE TAKAHASHI, HOgakushi. 

Neutrality, Treaties, and Public International Law in the East, 

KINJI TASHIMA, HOgakushi. Socialism, 

SEISUKE AWAZU, Hogakushi. Insurance. 

T3URUZO MATSUMURA, Kogakushi. 

Construction and Efficiency of Steam Engi)ies, 



2IO LIST OF STUDENTS. 

YASUJIRO SHIMA, KOgakushi. Locomotive Engines. 

CHIUSABURO SHIBA, K5gakushi. Marine Engines- 

SANNOSUKE OSAWA, KOgakushi. Theatrical Building, 

YOSHINAGA OSHIMA. Bungakushi. 

Ethics [Deontology in particular), 

TEI IWAMOrO, Bungakushi. Transcendental Idealism. 

SUYEHIKO KUSABA, Bungakushi. Poetry. 

MASATSURA MIYAMOTO. Bungakushi. Confucianism. 

KINGORO OMORI, Bungakushi. 

History of Customs and Institutions of Japan especially in Early 

Tim£S, 

TAROKICHI YOSHIKAWA, Bungakushi. Philosophy of History, 

SHINICHIRO FUWA, Bungakushi. 

History of Japanese Feudal System, compared with that of Europe, 

YOISHIJIRO HOMMA, Rigakushi. Dynamics and Electricity, 

MASUMI CHIKASHIGE, Rigakushi. 

Reactions between Cobalt Nitrate and Potassium Thiocyanate, 

USAMARU TAKAKURA, Rigakushi. Japanese Nemertines. 

IPPEI INAGAKI, NOgakushi. 

Physical Properties of Soils, and Agricultural Products. 

FUSAKICHI KOIDE, Ringakushi. 

Growth of Trees and Technical Properties of Wood. 

YASUYOSHl SHIRA3AWA, Ringakushi. Forest Botany. 

JIRO ASAO, HOgakushi. Money and Credit. 

TAKAHIKO OFUJI, KOgakushi. River Improvements. 

SOSABURO SUGIURA, Kogakushi. Railroads. 

MAGOICHI NOGUCHI, Kogakushi. Earthquake Proof Building. 

KIKUJI YABE, NOgakushi, Manures and Chemistry of Fermentation' 

JUNSHIRO OKUMURA, Nogakushi. 

Relation between Supply of Manures and Growth of Rice ^ Wheel and 
Barley, and Chemistry of Tobacco Manufacture and of Sake Brewing. 

TOMOMA3A MASUDA, Igakushi. 

The- Pervis of Japanese Woman and itS'Relation to the Mechanism 

of Delivery. 

GORO KUMAGAI, Bungakushi. Priniciples of Pedagogics- 

MASAO SHIOI, Bungakushi, Rhetoric in Japanese Literature, 

CHIHARU WATANABE, Bungakushi. History of India, 

NAOJIRO MURAKAMI, Early Intercourse of Japan with Western 

Nations [A.D. 1541—1640) 






LIST OF STUDENTS. 



211 



•SHINZO SHINJO. Rigakushi. 
DENJIRCJ SUTO, Rigakushi. 
JUT A HARA, Rigakushi. 
ATSUSHI YASUDA, Rigakushi. 
NAOMASA YAMASAKI, Rigakushi. 
YEIZABURO UYENO, NOgakushi. 

KIHETJI ONOZUKA, HOgakushi. 

YEIZO YAHAGI. HOgakushi. 

IWASABURO TAKANO, HOgakushi. 

YEITARO SUZUKI, HOgakushi. 

MASAO TANAKA, KOgakushi. 

ICHIRO YEZAKI, Kogakushi, 

AISABURO MATONO, KOgakushi. 

«HlOG0 HASEGAWA, KOgakushi. 

TOYOHACHI FUJITA, Bungakushi. 

YIJROKU HARA, Bungakushi. 

YUTARO SASAKI, Nogakushi. Soils and Micro-organisms in relation 

to Agriculture, 

English Poetry, 

Alternating Current Motor, 

Sanskrit, 

System of Chinese Ethies, 



Phgsies* 

Electricity and Magetism, 

jfapanese Myzostomidae'. 

Physiology of Fungi. 

Volcanoes. 

Agricultural Engineering and 

Agricultural Implements. 

Politics as a science. 

Economics of Agriculture, 

Econonics of Industry. 

Principles of Civil Law, 

Railway Constructions, 

Multiple Expansion Engine. 

Spinning and Weaving, 

Locomotive Engine, 

Chinese Philosophy, 

History of the present Century, 



SH I NJ I RO yam AG aw a, Bungakushi. 
KEIJIRO KiSHI, KOgakushi. 
RIO6ABUR0 SAKAKF^ Bungakushi. 
NAOKI KANG, Bungakushi. 
RENTARO MIURA, Igakushi. Medicine in Generad^ with special 

reference to Diseases of Kidneys and Diabetes, 
TORATARO NISHIMURA, KOgakushi. Special Railways. 

Surgery i« General, 

Surgery in General. 

Medicine in General, 

Private International Law, 

Railway Constructions. 

Railroads* 

Railroads, 

Harbour Works, 

Railway Constructions* 

Spinning and Weaving* 

Loc motive Engines, 

Marine Engines, 



TEIYEI NAKAHARA, Igakushi. 
MORIHIKO NAKAYAMA, Igakushi, 
KOFU YAMAGUCHI, Igakushi. 
SAMURO YAMADA, HOgakushi, 
KEISAKU SHIBATA, KOgakushi. 
MINORU UMENO, KOgakushi. 
TSUNEO TOKUMI, KOgakushi. 
KYOICHI AKI, KOgakushi. 
SHOTARO OMURA. KOgakushi. 
TATSUMI MOCHIDA, Kogakushi. 
TSUNEO GUSHIMA, KOgakushi. 
TSUNETARO SHINODA, Kogakushi. 



212 LIST OF STUDENT. 

HIDETARO no, KOgakushi. Electric Transmission of Power and its 

Distribution, 
TEIJI SUZUKI, K^gakushi. Earthquake- Proof Iron Building, 

KUNIHIKO YAMADA. KOgakushi. Ore Deposits. 

YOSHIRO IHARA, Kogakushi. - On the Application of 

Electrometallurgy. 
GENYOKU KUWAKI, Bungakushi. Epistemology: its Historical and 

Psychological Investigation, 
MASAHARU ANEZAKI, Bungakushi History of Religion, 

TONGO TATEBE, Bungakushi. Sociology, 

TOMOJIRO SHIMIZU, Bungakushi. Comparative Mythology. 

KOJIRO MATSUMOTO, Bungakushi. Theory of Sensations. 

ICHIJO HI ROT A, Bungakushi. Buddhism and Brahmanism. 

JIRO SHIMODA, Bungakushi. The Psychological Ground of 

Education. 
MORITARO HAYASHI, Bungakushi. Historical Grammar of the 

Japanese Language. 
BINSUKE SUGI, Bungakushi. On the Roots of the Japanese 

Language, 
T^IATAJIRO TAKESHIMA, Bungakushi. Japanese Literature of 

the Last Three Centuries, 

YOSHIYE OMACHI, Bungakushi. History of Japanese Poetry, 

JITSUZO KUWABARA, Bungakushi General History of China 

especially in regard to Her Relation and Intercourse with other 

countries, 
GINZO UCHIDA, Bungakushi. Japanese Economic History, and 

the Educational Value of History and Economies, 
TEIKICHI KIDA. Bungakushi. Historical Geography of J apan^ 

especially of the Kinai District and its Vicinity, 
KATSUMI KUROITA, Bungakushi. Paleography, 

SHIGETOMO KODA, Bungakushi. Comparative Study of Ancient 

Traditions, 
KATSURO HARA, Bungakushi. History cf Japanese Culture, 

dating from the Growth of the Military Class down to the Begin- 
ning of the Tokugawa Age, 
HIDEO SEGAWA, Bungakushi. History of the Chugoku District, 
from the time ofOchi Yoshitaka down to the Attack on Takamatsu 

Castle (i 528-1582). 



I 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 213. 

SHOZABURO KANAZAWA, Bungakushi. On the Scientific 

Study of the Aino Language ,■ 
BUNJIRO SHIMA, Bungakushi. The Drama of the Elizabethan Age. 
KUNITARO KUROYANAGI, Bungakushi, On the Lyrical Poetry 

of the igth Century (English), 
TOJIRO nag aye, Bungakushi, The Technic of Drama and the 

History of German Drama. 
KOICHI MATSUBARA, Rigakushi. Theoretical Chemistry. 

TATSUO AIDA, Rigakushi. ' Invertebrate Morphology. 

TAKUJl OGAWA, Rigakushi. Crystalline Schists. 

JUNZO OMORI, NOgakushi. Agricultural Botany and Zoology 

(especially Physiology and Pathology in relation to Sericulture and. 

the culture of mulbery trees). 
UMETARO SUZUKI, Nogakushi. Plant-Physiology (especially in 

relation to Plant Natrition). 
KOSABURO KUME, Ringakushi. Forest Politics. 

NAOSHI NITTA, Juigakushi. Bacteriology, 

MATASHIRO YOSHINO, KOgakushi. Steam Engines. 

ROKUZO KUME, KOgakushi. Railroads. 

RITSUZO TS.UMAGI, Gas-Explosion in Collieries. 

SHIZUO SANO, Rigakushi. Physics in General. 

KANZABURO KATSUMOTO, HOgakushi. Principles of Criminal 

Law, 
KOTARO NISHIZAKI, Yakugakushi. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

KIICHIRO YANO, K5gakushi. Flax-Spinning, 

TOMEJI NAKAMURA, Nogakushi. Microbes essential to the 

Manufaeturc of Agricultural Products* 



214 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



II. College of Law- 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Ichiro Haruki, Hogakusht, 

Chujiro Okabe, Hogakushi. 

Eitaro Suzuki, Hogakushi. 
Eeizo Yahagi, Hogakushi, 



Sakuye Takahashi, Hogaku- 
sht, 

Seitaro Nakayama, Hogaku- 
shi, 

Kiheiji Onozuka, Hogakusht, 

Iwasaburv) Takano, Hogaku- 
ski, 

Rintaro Asami, Hogakusht,. 



Kamemitsu Yamamoto, Ho 
gakushi, 

Samuro Yamada, Hogaku- Itaro Miki, Hogakushi^ 
ski. 

Takezo Nakamura, Hogaku- 
sht, 



LAW. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE THIRD EXAMINATION. 



+(iST Section.) 



*Katsuhiko Kakehi. 
Shoji Hirabayashi. 
Tomojiro Nakagawa, 
Masatsune Ogura. 
Morijiro Ha3^ashi. 
Kosai Inouye. 



*Kiyoshi Yabe. 
Takaichiro Akashi. 
Asakichi Yasukochi. 
Keisuke Hamura. 
Junkichi Matsumoto. 
Takuma I to. 



• Honour Students, 

fStudents who select English Law according to the Regulations for 
Examinations. (See p. 68) 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



215 



Yutaka Ueda. 

Hotsui Shimamoto. 

Isami Kawara. 

Hidesaburo Miura. 

Nakaji Kajiwara. 

Kugoro Omi. 

Kaname Watanabe. 

Kenji Ishida. 

Teitar5 Kako. 

Motoatsu Hojo. 

Yasabu Noguchi. 

Ichisaburo Matsudaira. 

Toshimichi Masuda. 

Daisaburo Ando. 

Motoe Komori. 

Tokutaro Hayakawa. 

Sadaji Nomura. 

Saijiro Narimichi. 

Yoshio Hara. 

Eigio Matsui. 

Shiuji Aoyama. 

Tadao Uno. 
Tanishiro Yamamoto. 



Sadanori Ogawa. 
Koretada Narita. 
Yukichi Obata. 
Takayoshi Hatano. 
Takeji Kawamura. 
Yasoichiro Omori. 
Masasuke Yamanaka. 
Seijiro Sugano. 
Taketaro Nishizaki. 
KentarO Sato. 
Toyozo Ota. 
Shosuke Akatsuka. 
Kitamatsu Sato. 
Naomoto Kumagai. 
Motosaburo Yam ay a. 
Kosaburo Noborisaka. 
Kazuyuki Kai. 
Michihiro Sasaki. 
Kentaro Fuse. 
Shuntaro Tachiiri. 
Tatsumi Nishimaki. 
Hachijiro Sasada. 



Taro Nakamura. 
Yuzaburo Kimura. 
Kisaburo Kawachi. 
Kinpei Kodama. 
Telsuzo Araki. 



*(2ND Section.) 

Shiro Negishi. 
Tare Okawara. 
Kenzo Hayashi. 
Toichiro Chujo. 



* Honour Students. 

* Students who select French Low according to the Regulation foi 
Cxaminations.(See p. 68) 



2l6 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



f(3RD Section.) 



*Teijir6 Sugimoto. 
A'lzo Akiyama. 
Kenzaburo Otani. 

CANDIDATES 



Juichi Suda. 
Toshiyuki Tsukui. 



*Junjitsu Hayao. 
*Ichita Kobashi. 
Kikuzo Kedo. 
Kuji Mitsui. 
Kinpachi Enomoto. 
Koichi Inouye. 
Itaro Tanimoto. 
Heishichi Orita. 
Kwan Hashimoto. 
Koichi Osumi. 
Kinichi Nakamura. 
Saikichi Inouye. 
Masao Maruo. 
Jiro Tanaka. 
Toshima Yano. 
Tomokichi Ishito. 
Kusushige Kawabuch 
Chujiro Tanaka. 
Kazuo Nishikawa. 
Junzo Niwa. 



FOR THE SECOND EXAMI 
NATION. 

(isT Section.) 

*Shigeo Katayama. 
Chuzo Hiyama. 
Eitaro Okamoto. 
Hidesaku Yooi. 
Masahiro Ota. 
Tokikazu Ikematsu. 
Masajiro Otobe. 
Eizaburo Asano. 
Yasusuke Mizuno. 
Rikutaro Hasegawa. 
Kazuo Iwasaki. 
Yunosuke Kurimoto. 
Hikaru Koga. 
Osamu Tsuruda. 
Enjiro Ogita* 
Noburo Ogo. 
Daitaro Sugawara. 
Hisata Matsuyama. 
Hirokichi Minatani. 
Tadasu Watanabe. 



1. 



* Honour Students. 

fStudent who select German Law according to the Regulations for 
Examinations.(See p. 68) 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



217 



Daikichi Imura. 
Akira Furuichi. 
Utaro Chikamatsu. 
Takehiko Ikoma. 
Kikushiro Kobayashi. 
Naganobu Tsutsumi. 
Nagato Maruyama. 
Tetsuji Sawasaki. 
Naoji Kira. 
Isaburo Nishiura. 
Ichisuke Nakamura. 
Hidegoro Fukuda. 
Masao Kato. 
Kamegoro Higashi. 
Kokichi Gishi. 
Yoshio Shigemi. 
Hiroshi Tanaka. 
Ikusaburo Akisu. 



Kanjiro Hori. 
Torao Koga. 
Aikuma Maruta. 
Kiyoshi Nonaka. 
Toshiaki Ando. 
Mitsuhiro Ota. 
Yasaburo Tajima. 
Ginemon Otani. 
Taijiro Endo. 
Eijun Kimura, 
Genzo Hara. 
Keiichiro Soyeda. 
Sadao Yokota. 
Shintaro Nozaki. 
Tokitaro Ishii. 
Bunjiro Nakayama. 
Matagoro Koga. 
Sukesaburo Kataoka. 



(2ND Section.) 

Nobuo Yokoi. Yoshio Ichino. 

Munosaku Tanuma. 



(3RD 



"^'Hidetaro Horiuchi. 
Hideyuki Nakayama. 
Ayumi Sagara. 
Masataka Suyama. 
Akira Kobayashi. 
Torao Furusho. 
Yasuyoshi Kango. 



Section.) 

Daizo Araki. 
Kotaro Nakagawa. 
Tetsuichi Mawatari. 
Kakusaburo Yaniauchi. 
Reisuke Hoshino. 
Den Koaze. 
Hiroshi Sato. 



"Honour Students. 



2l8 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Katsunori Itakura. 
Shinji Ishizaki. 
Muraji Chiga, 
Kio Sugawara. 



Goro Yokota. 
Ringoro Kusaba. 
Hidejiro Kurosu. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE FIRST 
EXAMINATON. 

(isT Section.) 



Keitaro Iwai. 
Risaburo Ito. 
Katsuakira Itakura. 
Utaro Inouye. 
Yataro Ishibashi. 
Tokitaro Ishizaki. 
Kinzo Hanaoka. 
Masunojo Hayashi. 
Masataka Honda. 
Riohei Todo. 
Kutaro Tobiishi. 
Akira Ouchi. 
Iwao Okamoto. 
Manjiro Okuyama. 
Kennosuke Wakabayashi. 
Hoken Watanabe. 
Jinhachiro Wake. 
Usuke Kawamura. 
Tomio Kanamori. 
Sagataro Kaku. 
Mamoru Yoshida. 
Gentaro Yoshimura. 



Hajime Ito. 
Shigemaro Irisawa. 
Hisashi Isobe. 
Kano Ishibashi. 
Masumi Ishikawa. 
Kantaro Isakari. 
Yasushige Hayashi. 
Shigeharu Nitta. 
Yoshishige Honma. 
Motoharu Tojima. 
Shinnosuke Gtaki. 
Kohachi Okasaki. 
Teitaro Okamoto. 
Yujiro Ozaki. 
Ichiro Watanabe. 
Masao Watanabe. 
Yasuichi Kawasoe. 
Daijiro Kato. 
Shosuke Kanzaki. 
Hisakichi Yokoyama. 
Ginzaburo Yoshida. 
Kenkichi Yoshino. 



i 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



219 



Kamenosuke Yoshizaki. 
Sakuji Tanino. 
Keitaro Takahashi. 
Keitaro Tadano. 
Reisuke Taguchi. 
Hideo Takizawa. 
Takeo Tsuji. 
Masao Nakaoji. 
Yoshio Nakamura. 
Junsaku Nakayama. 
Kuro Usuki. 
Masaatsu Kusunoki. 
Kaneyori Yana. 
Wataro Yamazaki. 
Wasaburo Yasukawa. 
Hitoshi Matsura. 
Takajiro Furuya. 
Kiyoshi Fukushima. 
Teishiro Kobayashi. 
Terusato Aika. 
Denjiro Asakura. 
Etsuro Saito. 
Shizuma Sato. 
Sugane Sako. 
Yoshinosuke Sakurane. 
Saijiro Kimura. 
Ippachi Miyoshi. 
Suyehiko Mitsui. 
Yaji Mishlma. 
Yoshimaro Shimura. 
Kokichi Shimasaki. 
MorizO Shimoda. 



Kiyosumi Tanikawa. 
Tanefumi Takahashi. 
Ichiro Takatsuki. 
Reisuke Danno. 
KintarO Takenouchi. 
Toyomaro Tsumagari. 
Seiichi Nakanishi. 
Tokiaki Nakamura. 
Eiji Nagano. 
Tomoe Utsunomiya. 
Koreyoshi Kubo. 
Hiroshi Yahashi. 
Masanori Yamada. 
Riosaku Yasuhara. 
Rikichi Matsuda. 
KiOichi Masunaga. 
Michihiko Fukai. 
Kamejiro Kobanawa. 
Sukeakira Goto. 
Kensuke Asada. 
Shigeyoshi Amamori. 
Kinsuke Sato. 
Chozaburo Sakai. 
Keijiro Sano. 
Bunzo Kitamura. 
Risaburo Yuhara. 
Jiro Mitsuyuki, 
Sanpei Mimura. 
Eijiro Shiokawa. 
Soken Shimada. 
Keiko Shigezumi. 
Kiyona Hirose. 



220 



List of Students. 



Sensaku Hirose. 
Yasutaro Hirano. 
Yoshizo Higuchi. 
Teizaburo Sekiya. 

Kiltaro lida. 
Arata Ninagawa. 
Bunzo Ogoe. 
Chifuyu Watanabe. 
Toyoji Kafuku. 
Sanzo Takashima. 
Risaburo Takemura. 
Seiya Nagai. 
Ichir6 Nagano. 
Masuro Kumazawa. 
Tokiyuki Yamada. 
Yorinosuke Goto. 
Akira Saigo. 
Yokichi Kitajima. 
Jisaku Shinoda. 

Aisuke Ikeda. 
Kunihiko Okamura. 
Keizo Kamada. 
Kiyoji Takaoka. 
Tadao Nakamura. 
Shintaro Furuya. 
Shigeyo Annaka. 
Takeo Sato. 
Sadao Kizawa. 



Yujiro Hideshima. 
Kinji Hirasawa. 
Kiyoshi Morii. 
Kisaburo Suga. 

(2ND Section.) 

Teiichi Niwa. 
Mikitaro Owada. 
Buhachiro Ozato. 
Yoshizo Kajiyaraa. 
Sanzo Takahashi. 
Chikuma Tanaka. 
Nobuhito Tsuchiya. 
Hisao Nakamura. 
Ko Noguchi. 
Sadao Yamawaki. 
Wasaburo Matsumoto. 
Sadajiro Atobe. 
Riuichi Sakamoto. 
Masaharu Jingushi. 
Shiro Moroi. 

(3RD Section.) 

Osamaro Nijo. - 
Kaneshiro Kawana. 
Tadasu Tanino. 
Motomaro Tatsuichi. 
Soichi Usawa. 
Shuro Komori. 
Ushimaro Sawada. 
Nobuyasu Sato. 
Takao Mizobuchi. 



i 






LIST O^ STUDENTS. 



221 



POLITICS. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE THIRD 
EXAMINATION. 



*Shingo Minami. 
Taikichi Shimizu. 
Hidelaro Ikebukuro. 
Toshihiko Murata. 
TOzaburo Kiono. 
Shinzo Ohara. 
Masayuki Sengoku. 
Koichiro Takei. 
Yasukichi Sugimoto. 
Matsujiro Obama. 
Keizaburo Tako. 
Teiichiro Hirano. 
Yutaro Nakajima. 
Kataro Sakai. 
Juro Kono. 
Shigeyoshi Arimura. 
Gozan Wada. 
Kiichiro Ichio. 
Masao Naruse. 



*Tatsukichi Minobe. 
Sakutaro Tachi. 
Kokichi Mizuno. 
Seizo Sugi. 
Kenzo Iwamasa. 
Yaroku Ikaga. 
Yamato Sonobe. 
Yujuro Sato. 
Masajiro Numata. 
Sadakazu Ogawa. 
Kiyoshi Sasagawa. 
Torataro Emitsu. 
Wataru Majima. 
Tatsuro Akadani. 
Kanzaemon Sekimoto. 
Teiichi Sakata. 
Taiji Uekusa. 
Renbu Cho. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE SECOND 
EXAMINATION. 

*Chinjiro Matsura. Sadayoshi Uyeno. 

Issei Tsukuda. Kurahei Iwasa. 

Shinkichi Hisamatsu. Taroji Takeda. 

Jui Matsumoto. Yojiro Shinoda. 



'Honour Students. 



222 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Riheida Kameyama. 
Sakaye Kishisaki. 
Riohei Sengoku. 
Tadao Yamagawa. 
Korenao Nagai. 
Kaisuke Hamaguchi. 
Harushige Hatada. 
Tsunemaro Kubota. 
Yutaro Ugawa. 
Tsurujiro Hara. 
Yojiro Watanabe. 
Takeyoshi Watanabe. 
Motoshiro lio. 
Junpei Takeyama. 
Tokugoro Oda. 
Kohei Nakamura. 
Masumichi Tani. 
Masafumi Kashiwagi. 
Reizo Sasaki. 
Samuro Iwata. 
Keiji Onuki. 
Tameshige Yamada. 
Gengoro Yoshitake. 



Hiroshi Shimomura. 
Taro Mishima. 
Riozuburo Akiyama. 
Rokuro Yasuda. 
Kiyoyo Kumamoto. 
Shinnosuke Watanabe. 
Kazuki Tokieda. 
Keitaro Murai. 
Tetsujiro Sakano. 
Shinjiro Nagayasu. 
Minoru Oka. 
Yoshitaro Hara. 
Seiichi Hatori. 
Mikitaro Hayashi. 
Keijiro Kawai. 
Bunichi Haraguchi. 
Yosozo Yoshimura. 
Shinzo Uozumi. 
Sakuroku Tanahashi. 
Takeo Kakinuma. 
Morika Ono. 
Sada Hori. 
Samuro Ota. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE FIRST 
EXAMINATION. 



Naokata li. 
Kaichi Igarashi. 
Riuzo Imai. 
Tsunao Ishii. 
Taisuke Harukawa. 



Masatoshi Ichiku. 
Minoru Inada. 
Tsuchihiko Igi. 
Naoki Ijiuin. 
Toyojiro Harada. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



223 



Mokunosuke Hayashi. 
Inosuke Nishikaze. 
Masamichi Hiodo. 
Uichiro Tobioka. 
Shiro Ota. 
Toru Otobe. 
Shinichiro Ono. 
Sadao Wakamiya. 
Hikoji Kawaguchi. 
Kazuye Kato. 
Kitsuzo Kono. 
Masami Yoshida. 
Umekichi Takase. 
Toranosuke Sone. 
Kinichiro Tsuda. 
Naohiko Tsukiyama. 
Masayoshi Nagata. 
Torakichi Nakaniura. 
Ko Nakamura. 
Shozo Nakaya. 
Tameyuki Uto. 
Koki Noguchi. 
Masaaki Yamauchi. 
Heikichi Yamamoto. 
Mamuru Matsura. 
Seiichi Fujise. 
Karo Funatsu. 
Tanenori Kokubu. 
Toshihiro Eguchi. 
Umekichi Akamatsu. 
Kuichiro Annaka. 
Kagehide Asayama. 



Ujimasa Niwa. 
Morimaro Horikawa. 
Masazo Toyama. 
Tokutaro Ota. 
Shinichi Ono. 
Kinichi Okabe. 
Katsumi Oyama. 
Sen Kawazu. 
Masayasu Kawaminami. 
Kuninosuke Katsube. 
Yusuke Yoshikawa. 
Yoriakira Takatsuki. 
Benkichi Tanabe. 
Sakio Tsurumi. 

• 

Seiyu Tsuzurabara. 
Yoshitoki Nao. 
Sansei Nakatsu. 
Yonezo Nakamura. 
Ivvata Nakano. 
Kameichi Natsuaki. 
Ken Nomura. 
Koremasa Kuromaru. 
Seiku Yamazaki. 
Tatsuma Yagi. 
Moriyoshi Fujimura. 
Sentaro Fukada. 
Kuniharu Fuse. 
Yusuke Komori. 
Kusukichi Aoki. 
Senkichi Arai. 
Tsurusaburo Ano. 
Seitaro Saigo. 



224 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



lyeta Sato. 
Tadaaki Sakai. 
Masatsugu Kirii. 
Yuji Kimura. 
Keijiro Kikuchi. 
Hisatomo Miyoshi. 
Sannosuke Miyanohara. 
Sanshiro Shiokawa. 
Keiji Shinohara. 
Kozaburo Shimamura. 
Rikuji Shimoyama. 
Matashichi Hirai. 
Moriji Moriyama. 
Shigeo Suyehiro. 
Kakutaro Suda. 
Sukenoshin Sugiyama. 



Shuzo Saji. 
Masahiko Sakakibara. 
Tomoji Kitahara. 
Kohei Kimura. 
Kimimichi Yuri. 
Takeo Mitsumatsu. 
Sutezo Misumi. 
Katsutami Shida. 
Bunosuke Shimada. 
Sosuke Shigenaga. 
Shojiro Hirose. 
Takasamuro Hisada. 
Kengo Mori. 
Hachiro Sudo. 
Akira Sunaga. 
Shizuka Suzuki. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 



Yonezo Goto. 
Bunji Okada. 
Kurazo Ikumi. 
Nihei Mayeda. 
Aikichi Okamoto. 
Sadajiro Hirose. 



Kaiichi Toda. 
Atsushi Hashimoto, 
Shozo Yoda. 



LAW. 



Tokutaro Sugiyama. 
Bennosuke Yamamura. 
Kozo Mori. 
Jiro Ishida. 
Naoki Nakaye. 



I 



POLITICS. 



Tomotsune Mizutani. 
Nobukichi Hattori. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



225 



III. College of Medicine. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Chisei Masuda, Igakushi. 
Teiyei Nakahara, Igakushi, 

Kofu Yamaguchi, Igakushi. 

Toyoji Suzuki, Igakushi, 
Kameichiro Kashida, Igaku 
shi. 



Rentaro Miura, Igakushi, 
Morihiko Nakayama, Igaku- 
shi, 
Kotaro Nishizaki, Ynkuga- 

knshi, 
Jiichiro Nishimdki, Igakushi, 
Chikakuni Moriya, Igakushi' 



STUDENTS UNDERGOING FINAL EXAMI 
NATION IN MEDICAL COURSE. 



*Chobei Hayashikawa. 
*Tsunemaru Sato. 
Tatsujiro Kawai. 
Kenichiro Takasu. 
Kinjiro Kagawa. 
Goro Moriya, 
Kuwazo Muramatsu. 
Kosho Kato. 
Kenichiro Ikeda. 
Dengo Takahashi. 
Kihichiro Takeichi. 
Kenkitsu Ito. 



*Nasujiro Toriyama. 
Jokichi Nakajima. 
Kenichiro Horikawa. 
KeijirO Fujioka. 
Ketsu Shiga. 
Shigeru Yazaki. 
Masao Shibukawa. 
Shotaro Mashimo. 
Yoshio Iwabuchi. 
Kichitaro Taniguchi. 
Mototaro Atsuta. 



Honour Students. 



220 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Fourth Year. 



"•"Shinkichi Imamura. 
Kiukichi Kay a. 
Soichiro Miura. 
Gentsu Kuroda. 
Gaisaburo Kudo. 
Taiichiro Chiba. 
Masao Yoshizawa. 
Masao Nakayama. 
Morio Sasaki. 
Unpei Adachi. 
Kotaro Kitajima. 
Korin Yamada. 
Torago Wakabayashi. 
Kodo Suzuki. 
Riotaro Tojio. 
Kctaro Fujimoto. 



Haruo Hayashi. 
Masao Takayama. 
Kintaro Tsuji. 
Okimaru Chiuma. 
Doji Matsuoka. 
Kichiya Saigo. 
Kenzaburo Ogawa. 
Shingoro Maruyama. 
Chiuichiro Hida. 
Ichiro Takino. 
Genzo Hotta. 
Risuke Yoshida. 
Gaizo Murai. 
Shuzo Wakagi. 
Gario Kawakami. 



Third Year. 



*Suku Miyamoto. 
Seita Takanami. 
SaburO Akutsu. 
Futoshi Makita. 
Harusabur6 Sato. 
Chijiro Murayama. 
Hichiro Hida. 
Hajime Iwata. 
Chiozaburo Okatani. 
Kiozo Ito. 



Yekichi Okada. 
Keigi Sawada. 
Riuji Shima. 
Gorosaku Shibayama. 
KasaburO Tamura. 
Shigeo Adachi. 
Riuta Kuroda. 
Jiosaku Tajima. 
Matsunosuke Kitagavva. 
Tsunesaburo Miyoshi. 



•Honour Students. 



A 



. LIST OF STUQENTS. 



227 



Tamotsu Imamura. 
Shotaro Mayeno. 
Kinjirp Sasaki. 
Muneyuki, Nakano. 



Kenzaburo Shimada. 
Kichiro Kojima. 
Isachi Mikami. 
Tsunetaro Kominami. 



Second Year. 



*Riukichi Inada. 
Hiroshige Shiwoda. 
Tokuye Kimura. 
Shigeru Kobayashi. 

« 

Rictaro Inaba. 
Tokuro Miyata. 
Jiro Otori. 
Reiichi Narumiya. 
Renzo Akiyama. 
Seisho Yamazaki. 
Bunnosuke Yagibashi. 
Hideichiro Kudo. 
Tatsusaburo Kurozawa. 
IsotarO Kawakubo. 
Seito Yamazaki. 



Jun Otsuki. 
Toshimatsu Fujii. 
Kensai Takemura. 
Yutaka Teruuchi. 
Mitsuru Ishikawa. 
Yasusaburo Oguro. 
Torakichi Matsunami. 
Rokuro Takeda. 
Yasusaburo Sakaki. 
Riohichiro Amenomiya. 
Renkichi Moriyasu. 
Komanosuke Togami. 
Tokutaro Nakahara. 
GentarO Matsushima. 
Kenkichi Asahi. 



First Year. 



Nobuo Inouye. 
Yuichi Iwase. 
Hiromu Ishiwara. 
Nawotada Nishi. 
Riozo Onuma. 
Kenkichi Ono. 
Tokuzo Ono. 
Toyota Ono. 



Tsuneju Imabuchi. 
Yoichi Imai. 
Joko Nlshiuchi. 
Hirotaka Tokuoka. 
Shigeatsu Otani. 
Shiro Okabe. 
Shozaburo Cto. 
Teisei Okamoto. 



228 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 



Tamaki Kameya. 
Shingi Kakizawa. 
Jinzo Yoshino. 
Kakutaro Nagai. 
Kaname Namba. 
Tokusaburo Nakamura. 
Fukusaburo Nagase. 
Kinichi Naka. 
Inokichi Kubo. 
Shokan Kuroda. 
Atsushi Kubo. 
Sanya Matsuda. 
Takeshi Tejima. 
Kiyotoshi Arakawa. 
Ichijun Amagishi. 
Tsunejiro Sakurai. 
Yusuke Saito. 
Masuo Kimura. 
Tomimatsu Shidachi. 



Teikichi Kano. 
Kosaburo Yoshida. 
Kamesaburo Takeuchi, 
Heijiro Nakayama. 
Morinobu Nakajima. 
Takehiko Nakanishi. 
Mukojiro Naito. 
Hiyakusaburo But6. 
Chozabufo Kusumoto, 
Kumao Kurata. 
Daizo Yanagawa. 
Michinori Fujibayashi. 
Morizo Aiba. 
Kenkichi Asai. 
Risaburo Ayabe. 
Torata Sano. 
Tsunesaburo Saito. 
Masami Shimada. 
Juzaburo Suzuye. 



PHARMACY. 
Third Year. 



*Yenji Inouye. 
Taro Oshima. 



Yasutaro Ito. 



Sentaro Tanii. 
Sunao Miyagawa. 



Kazuo Nagai. 



Second Year. 

First Year. 

Tokichi Amenomiya. 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 



229 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS, 



MEDICINE. 



Shingi Minagawa. 
Asakichi Shimano. 
Kataro Kawamura, 
Ikuzo Fukushima. 
Ikuhei Chikada. 
Shinji Miyao. 
Toraichi Yoshioka. 
Kanichi Kurogata. 
Kokichi ItO. 
Yoshitsuna Ban. 
Hokei Sudo. 
KatsujirO Tajima. 
Kosaku Hayashi. 
Yoshisaburb Yoshida. 
Bukio Nagai. 
Kumataro Kawabatake. 
Han Koike. 
Masatoshi Ichinose. 
Rinsho Suzuki. 
Sashiro Ihashi. 
Kenji Adachi. 
Mayeda Kadowaki. 
Kuranosuke Saito. 
Motoshige Sato. 
Yetisujiro Nakamura. 



Kennosuke Fujii. 
Yeshiro Fujii. 
Binju Kikuchi. 
Juro Hatori. 
Yasutada Futagawa. 
Ichigaku Ota. 
Kofu Tatsuno. 
Isuke Furuya. 
Tazuo Goto. 
Toyojir6 Uchiyama. 
Hiizu Yoda. 
Kotaro Adachi. 
Hideyuki Matsuoka. 
Kiyoshi Kono. 
Rikuma Hayashi. 
Hikoji Koyanagi. 
Yonekichi Yamamoto. 
Ko Wakasugi. 
Shunroku- Numata. 
Yutaka Otsuki 
Rioshiku Ishikawa. 
Tairio Akai. 
Tadao Watanabe. 
Matasaburo Ureshino. 
Yozin Asano. 



230 



.LIST OF STUDENTS. 



PHARMACY. 



Yozo Takabatake. 
Tomota ^avvatari. 
Toyokichi Shibata. 
Tokusaburo Moriguchi. 
Riosaku Yasuda. 
Heikichi Nishio. 
Iwao Kanazawa. 



Rifu Fukuda. 
Shokichi Fujiwara. 
Hideichi libashi. 
Chonosuke Hasegawa* 
Kamesaburo Tanabe. 
Torama KondO. 



IV. College bf Engineering. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Masao Tanaka, Kogaknshi, 
Aisabubro Matano, Kogaku- 

shi. 
Keijiro Kishi, Kogakushi, 

Torataro Nishimura, Ko- 
gakushi, 

Minoru Umeno, Kogakushi. 

Kyoichi Aki, Kogakushi. 

Matashiro Yoshino, Kogaku- 
shi. 

Tsuneo Gushima, Kogaku- 
shi. 

Tokuro Uchida, Kogakushi. 

Kunisuke Sekito, Kogakushi, 

Bunrokurd Sugino, Kogaku- 
shi. 



Ichiro Esaky, Kogakushi. 

Shogo Hasegawa, Kogaku- 
shi. • 

Sannosuke Osawa, Kogaku- 
shi. 

Keisaku Shibata, Kogakushi* 

Tsuneo Tokumi, Kogakushi* 
Shotaro Omura, Kogakushi. 
Tatsumi Mochida, Kogaku' 

shi. 
Tsunetaro Shinoda, Kogaku^ 

shi. 
Jitsuro Yolioi, Kogakushi. 
Hidetaro Ho, Kogakushi^ 
Teiji Suzul"»\ Kogakushi. 



i 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



231 



Tsunejiro Fukuoka, Kogakii- 

shi, 
Yoshiro Ihara, Kogakushi, 
Ritsuzo Tsumaki, Kogaku- 
shi, 



Kunihiko Yamada, Kogaku- 
shi. 
Rokuzo Kume, Kogakushi 
Kiichiro Yano,' Kogakushi, 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Yhird 

*Tadahiko Hibi. 
Tomejiro Taketa. 
Ichitaro Hoshino. 
Shidzuo Hara. 
Naoya Shimasaki. 
S'ukeo Sakai. 
Shintaro Yamanaka. 
Samuru Muruta. 
Yusuke Yokobatake. 
Tatsunosuke Yamamolo. 
Chosaku Okumura. 
Nuigoro Kato. 



Year. 

Koichi Okochi. 
Atsunobu Fuji. 
Maruo Ikeda. 
Kwanichi Maekawa. 
Nabetaro Miura. 
Koichi Inouye. 
Shigeto Eda. 
Yoshijiro Funatsuka. 
Shigeharu Shima. 
Jiuro Agawa. 
Yeiichi Murase. 



*Sh6jiro Tagawa. 
Kiichiro Morigaki. 
Sanae Mori. 
Yoroshi Ban. 
Kojiro Kawakami. 
Kazumi Takahashi. 
Hidekichi Sanada. 
Sakitaro Yamaji. 
Giheiji Uchida. 



Second Year. 

*Yoshio Kinoshita. 
Yosuke Yamagata. 
Taroichi Yoshimachi. 
Nobutoshi Yamamoto. 
Takeo Hotta. 
Chikao Inouye. 
Hikoshichi Maki. 
Narakichi Taga. 
Esaburo Abe. 



* Honour Students. 



232 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Yoshio Watanabe. 
Shigekitsu Komizo. 
WaichirO Miyagawa. 
Hiroiuki Ando. 
Isami Ikoma. 
Sadamatsu Katayama. 
Kakukichi Suzuki. 
Kazunori Shimizu. 
Aijiro Katsumata. 
Toshihiko Watanuki. 
Tsutomu Fujino. 



Hidekiyo Saoda. 
Harutaro Nakagiri. 
Ujibumi Nishiike. 
Kosuke Kanazawa. 
Kakutaro Matsushita. 
Hisashi Awoki. 
Tsuneo Ito. 
Toshishige Okamura. 
Kogen Nakamura. 
Teiichiro Okuda. 



First Year. 



Narumi Ivvata. 
Kanaye Ishikawa. 
Tatsujiro Nishiide. 
Kiyokazu Oi. 
Umewaka Ogino. 
Seiichi Kasai. 
Kuraji Takaishi. 
Minekichi Tsuchiya. 
Ikuo Nakamura. 
Chikatane Uno. 
Junpei Kuba. 
Shinjo Yanai. 
Shozabnro Kobayashi. 
Tomojiro Kondo. 
Narumi Sakaide. 
Yukichi Mita. 
Takuma Minoda. 
Buhei Higashi. 
Ryokichi Hisamatsu. 



Fuhito Imazu. 
Kogoro Habu. 
Chiuichi Tominaga. 
Noboru Okano. 
Tamaki Watanabe. 
Naonobu Tani. 
Kichiji Tanaka. 
Rintaro Naoki. 
Kenichi Ukai. 
Yukimasa Usuki. 
Yuji Kumon. 
Motokazu Yamaoka. 
Unpei Goto. 
Keijiro Asada. 
Kenjiro Sakuma. 
Sanshi Mizokuchi. 
Tsuchitaro Shimizu. 
Suegoro Hisano. 
Hiroshi Suzuki. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



233 



-I- 



Tokiji Hagiwara. 
Shinkichi Yamada. 
Nisoji Tasaki. 
Tsuto Hagio. 
Yosaburo Jo. 
Shoji Konishi. 
Kintaro Yamaguchi. 
Denichiro Nishuaki. 

"'Masao Kamo. 
Yoshio Hayakawa. 
Kumajiro Makiyama. 
Kiichiro Matsunaga. 
Toraichi Awoyama. 
Senzaburd Takasu. 
Toyokichi Harada. 
Hikonobu Arita. 
Kumezo Ito. 
Toshihiko Ezure. 

Yasukichi Ito. 
Masahiko Ikeda. 
Seiji Toyota. 
Tatsuo Watanabe. 
Kishiro Watanabe. 
Tatsuhiko Kamiya, 
Koshiro Tsukamoto. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
Third Year. 

Sakuma Tsutsumi. 



Yoichi Awoyama. 
Seiji Takasu. 
Teisei Matsumura. 
Senkichi Otsuka. 
Rinnosuke Kaneshige. 
Keizo Nakami. 
Takeshi Hirano. 

SecOxND Year. 

'•'Masaharu Ishiwara. 
Magoshiro Kawabe. 
Toyoo Furukawa. 
Takeharu Inouye. 
Sabur6 Koga* 
Kozo Taguchi. 
Gisaburo Tagami. 
Toshio liyama. 
Sojiro Haga. 

First Year. 

Yoshio Ichihashi. 
Masasuke Izuha. 
Toshimaro Tominaga. 
Keizo Wada. 
Utaro Kawaguchi. 
Shinaji Takemoto. 
Nobuji Tsukamoto. 



* Honour Students. 



234 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



ShOshiro Tsurumi. 
Seiichi Nomoto. 
Sakuro Yamada. 
Ishinosuke Furuyama. 
Torazo Konishi*. 
Takekichi Aramaki. 
Seiichi Sasase. 
Eisaburo Shinano. 



Seiichi Nagaye. 
Kyosuke Nojiri. 
Yoshio Maruo. 
Nuijiro Fukushima. 
Akira Akaba. 
Nobuyoshi Anrha. 
Misao Miyazaki. 
Takaye Shimamura. 



NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 
Third Year. 



'''Tatsu Kumakura. 
Tomomoto Seida. 
Kiichiro Shibaoka, 
Sotaro Mi3'azako. 

Kiyojiro Ota. 
Junichiro Imaoka. 
Naosaburo Kusakabe. 
Yoshimichi Togashi. 
Uhei Masumoto. 

Toshiichi Toki. 
Yutaka Ota. 
Shinjiro Watanabe. 
Choji Yamamoto. 
Masuz6 Fujita. 
Nario Kimura. 



*Tamatar6 Tojyo. 
Minetar5 Katayama. 
Heiji Saiki. 

Second Year. 

Narutoshi Yokota. 
Naoji Tomikawa. 
TetsujQro Shinowara, 
Naohide Iwano. 

First Year. 

Tokuichi Okochi. 
Suejiro Oda. 
Sueo Nonaka. 
Tsuneji Maruyama. 
• Seitaro Kojima. 
Koshiro Shiba. 



* Honour Students. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



23S 



TECHNOLOGY OF ARMS. 



Second Yehr. 



Nobuharu Ishizawa. 



Naoharu Imaizumi. 



Yasushi Shinowara. 



First Year. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 



*Giichi Ishizu. 
Shujiro Urata. 
Iwaichi Notomi. 
Katsusaburo Oyama. 



*Eisaku Hikasa. 

m 

Daizo Ogoshi. 
Yoshiro Furuya. 
Kaoru Tomita. 
Jiro Ogata, 
Sansaku Ishizaka. 
Tsuneichi Fujiyama. 
Naoji Maki. 
Yoshihisa Nishiwaki. 
Tsugimitsu Nishimura. 
Tokihiko Tanegashima: 



Third Year. 

Fusajuro Miyakita, 
Ryohei Ogawa. 
Morisaburo Tonegawa. 
Kigenji Ichikawa. 

Second Year. 

Eiji Awoyama. 
Sanjiro Yamamoto. 
Shigeki Nakaya. 
Konosuke Nakamura. 
Shuji Suzuki. 
Fusawaka Ono. 
Ryoji Hirayama. 
Etsuzo Watanabe. 
Umesaburo Yamada. 
Riuzo Nakamura. 



* Honour Students. 



i236 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



First Year. 



Hokasuke Ihara, 
Yoshikazu Nishikawa. 
Yukio Okitsu. 
Yoji Kasuya. 
Shiro Takano. 
Toy 00 Tanaka. 
Koichi Noguchi. 
Shikanosuke Furusho. 
Katsu Fukuda. 
Shigeshi Kondo. 
Takeo Miyaguchi. 



Kikutaro Hayashi. 
Kohei Ogura. 
Namihei Odaira. 
Taketaro Takahashi* 
Shigekane Toda. 
Rokushiro Tsuruda. 
Kei Machihara. 
Kaoru Fukui. 
Goro Fujimoto. 
Takesaburd Akiyama. 
Uchuji Minamizawa. 



ARCHITECTURE. 



Third Year. 



*Goichi Taketa. 
Matsunosuke Moriyama. 
Shigemitsu Matsumuro. 
Tetsuya Nakagawa. 



Yasushi Hosono. 
Kokichi Yamaguchi. 
Tetsuro Nakaye. 



Second Year. 



Seiichiro Chujo. 



Osaburo Hoshino. 



First Year. 



Takaharu Onogi. 



Shichigoro Yamada. 



* Honour Students. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



237 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 



Third Year. 



Chiri Otsuki. 
Rokutard Hachiya. 
Tsuruichi Tsurumaki. 



Manji Okada. 
Shinnosuke Matsunaga. 



Sfcond Year. 



*Kisaburd Miyama. 
Ushichi Sugi. 
Tadashi Moniwa. 
Asobu Naitd. 



Kenichi Higuchi. 
Tokujiro Takamatsu, 
Keiji Mitani. 



First Year. 



Sunao Tsukamoto. 
Hiroshi Muraoka. 
j^Btao Noguchi. 

itsuzo Fujii. 
Ichitaro Shoji. 



Kihachi Nagai. 
Takichi Ueda. 
Takao Noma. 
ItarO Minoda. 



MINING AND METALLURGY. 
Third Year. 



*Chusuke Suehiro. 
Kuniichi Tawara. 
Heitaro Kawai. 
Seinosuke Hoso. 
Yoshio lijima. 
Gengord Taguchi. 
Sokujiro Yabukj^ 



Ujimichi Nakaoji. 
Jokichi Fujioka. 
Tokuji Kawai. 
Juzaburo Matsumiya. 
Sokichi Ko. 
Seiryd Hoga. 



* Honour Students. 



^38 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Second Year. 



*Daikichi Saito, 
Kanji Hasegawa. 
Katsutaro Tanabe. 
Shokichi Yamamoto. 
Yaichiro Wakabayashi. 
Kojiro Wanami. 
TokutarO Segawa. 
Iwazo Okada. 
Motaro Saki'kawa. 
Senma Miyazaki. 
Matsutaro Shioi. 
Taro Tomita. 
Tamenosuke Takama. 



JintarO Kojima. 
Chiwaki Nomura. 
Benzo Katsura. 
Hidehiko Nakamoto. 
Kazuye Kibe. 
Masutomo Maekawa. 
Seijiro Omura. 
Yoshitaro Kusakabe, 
Keikichi Miyoshi. 
SeizO Tsumaki. 
Kamekichi Kurata. 
Tokuta Inamura. 
KeijirO Nishio. 



First Year. 



Tadashiro Inouye. 
Tamejiro Ishiguro. 
Kazumaro Yoshizawa. 
Ryota Tanimura. 
Naoyoshi Tajima. 
Chiuichi Yamada. 
Ainosuke Fukuchi. 
Makio Arakawa. 
Mosuke Kikuchi. 
Kirokuro Suto. 



Choji Imai. 
Juro Oshima. 
Yeijiro Yokokura. 
Korehiko Takenouchi. 
Soichiro Murata. 
Yoshihiko Yagi. 
Ayao Komurp. 
Iwaki Kikkawa. 
TOta Endo. 



FLECTIVE STUDENTS 
Electrical Engineering. 



Shiro Yamasaki, 



Tamenosuke Konishi, 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



i239 



Architecture. 



Katsumi Fukushima. 



V- College of Literature. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Bunzaburo Matsumoto, Bun- 

gnkushi, 
Agu SaitOy Buugakushi. 

Tei Iwamoto, Buugakushi. 

Kingoro Omori, Buugakushi, 

Goro Kumaya, Buugakushi, 

Toyohachi Fujita, Buugaku- 
shi, 

Naojiro MurakamitBungaku- 
shi, 

Riozaburo Sakaki, Buugaku- 
shi. 

Kiichi Sagaki, Bnngakushi, 

Naoki Kano, Buugakushi. 

Maiaharu Anezaki, Buu- 
gakushi. 

Tomojiro Shimizu, Buugaku- 
shi. 



Yasusaburo Yoneyama, Bun- 
gakushi. 

Yoshinaga Oshima, Bun- 
gakushi. 

Masatsura Miyamoto, Bun- 
gakushi. 

Tarokichi Yoshikawa, Buu- 
gakushi. 

Masao Shioi, Buugakushi. 

Chiharu Watanabe, Bun- 
gakushi. 

Yuroku Hara, Buugakushi. 

Einosuke Kuribara, Bun- 
gakushi. 

Shinjiro Yamakawa, Bun* 
gakushi. 

Genyoku Kuwaki, Buugaku- 
shi. 

Tongo Take be, Buugakushi, 

Kojiro Matsumoto, Buugaku- 
shi. 



240 LIST OF STUDENTS. 

Ichijo Hirota, Buiigakiishi, Jiro Shimoda, Bnngakushi, 
Moritaro Hayashi, Bun- Toshisuke Sugi, Btingaku- 

gakushi. ski. 

Matajiro Takejima, Bun- Yosh'iG Omachi, BungakushL 

gakushi, 
Jitsuzu Kuwabara, Bnugakn- GinzQ Uchida, Bungakushi. 

shi» 
Teikichi Kida, Bungakushi, Katsumi Kurbta, Bungaku- 
shi, 
Naritomo Koda, Bungnku^ Katsuro Hara, Bungakushi, 

shi. 
Hideo Segawa, Bungaknshi, Shozaburo Kanazawa, Bun- 
gakushi, 
Bunjiro Shima, Bungakushi, Kunitaro Kuroyanagi, Bun- 
gakushi, 
Tojiro Nagae, Bungakushi, Reishiro Nakano, Bungaku- 
shi, 
Nobuo Kawaguchi, Bun- Naomasa Chujo, Bungaku- 
gakushi, shi. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

Third Year. 

*Yoshimaru Kaniye. Kenrio Yoshida. 

Michihiro Akagi. Masatsugu Tsukahara. 

Gisaburo Okano. Seiichi Taki. 

Kwankai Toda. Naotaro Nonomura. 

Akiyoshi Sasabe. Matajiro Hatori. 

Masakazu Itagaki. Enjiro Mine. 

* Honour Students. 



LIST OF STUDENT. 



241 



Kanbei Tsutsumi. 
Natsunae Ikeda. 



Sannosuke Ogata. 
Hiroshi Kamiya. 



Second Year. 



*Seichi Yoshida. 
Shinobu Imafdku. 
Tomoharu Yamanobe. 
Sanenori Uyeno. 
IchitarO Kamioka. 
Yosaku No. 
Tatsugoro Murakami. 
Momoyo Oka. 
Kijuro Suyehisa. 
Ringum'a Wada. 
Mitsuvoshi Hatta. 



Kenjiro Fujii. 
Jdkan Chikazumi. 
Sanjuro Tomonaga. 
DaijO Tokiwa. 
Kiyohiko Kubo. 
Tomoyoshi Tomiogi 
Hideo Ota. 
Giichi Yuasa. 
Teishiro Takesuye. 
Teruhiko Koga. 
Dogen Toru. 



First Year. 



Daiji Ichikawa. 
Seiichi Hatano. 
HirotarO Hayashi. 
Kentoku Hori. 
Keijitsu Toraishi. 
Kiyoshi Kakiyama. 
Kioshin Nakao. 
Yoshio Noda. 
Tankai Maoka. 
Riukichi Endo. 
Masaaki Moriuchi. 
Eiichiro Sugimoto. 



Yasuchika Ikeda. 
Tatsutoyo Hara. 
Shinichiro Nishi. 
Wataru Totoki. 
GeHchi Kato. 
Saburo Tamaki. 
Sadazo Uyemura. 
Chido Kuriki. 
Tomokishi Fukurai. 
Keizaburo Kitahama. 
Tomitsuchi Sugiyama. 



*Honottr Students. 



I 



242 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 

JAPANESE LITERATURE. 
Third Year. 



♦Ratsutoyo Onogi. 
Koichi Hoshina. 



*Masayoshi Okada, 
Masachika Hirai. 



Toraji Shinbo. 
Naotaro Saito. 
Kozo Utsumi. 



Second Year. 



Seijiro Yokochi. 
Tokutaro Obayashi. 



Hitoshi Ichimura. 
Tsuratsune Cho. 
Hidezo Kubota. 
Yomota Sakamoto. 



First Year. 



Sadao Ikeda. 
Kiosuke Yoshioka. 
Sutekichi Sakai. 



CHINESE LITERATURE. 

Third Year. 

Jiro Shirakawa. Mansuke Taki. 

Daiju Shimizu. Naokata Mori. 

Naozo Matsuyama. Kageji Kamida. 
Kinzaburo Akamuma. 



Second Year. 



*Kend6 Ito. 
Kazutsugu Akizuki. 



Takejiro Takase. 
Siiyeo Otsuka. 



•Honour Students. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



243 



Tetsuei Mizuki. 
Masazumi Sakai. 
Keijiro Marui. 



Miyokichi lida. 
Saneo Doi. 
Tetsuya Kawada. 
Tokuji Kubo. 
Yusei Arima. 



Egen Asahino. 
Yoshiharu Fukuyama. 

First Year. 

Kunihiko Ito. 
Santoku Kadowaki. 
Kiushiro Nakaj'ama. 
Shoichiro Yamaguchi. 
Shinzo Mitsuda. 



JAPANESE HISTORY. 
Third Year. 



Torajiro Kitagawa. 
*Sadakazu Shigeta. 
Tokugoro Nakamura. 
Mosaburo Shoda. 
Sachihiko TenbO. 
Kenichi Takamiya. 
Nakasaburo Ogino. 



*Egen Sako. 
£nj6 Kasuga. 
Isami Okamoto. 
Isamu Saito. 
Yatsuka Ozaki. 
Kokichi Sato. 



Sada Waki. 
Kiyotoshi Kusumoto. 
Eiichi Takayama. 
Kiozo Ohara. 
Shigeo Haishi. 
Takejiro Senju. 
Kikutaro Miura. 



Second Year. 



Tatsujiro Shichiri, 
Makoto Esaki. 
Masakuni Shiroichi. 
Hideshiro Hara. 
Toshisuke Murata. 
Tatsuzo Yokoyama. 



^Honour Students. 



244 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Makoto Masaki. 
Shinshi Mita. 
Naogoro Yamakawa. 



Taketora Kiyooka^ 
Koichi Nomura.. 



First Year. 



Zenkio Hokaku. 
Kumeo Otomo. 
Tadayori Nakagawa. 
Tsunekichi Kubota. 
Tatsuya Eiri. 
Manjiro Hiroe. 



Hikoshiro Hoshino. 
Zennosuke Tsuji. 
Kosaku Kurokawa. 
Toshimaro Koze. 
Fumitoki Miyukida. 
Masashi Hirayama. 



HISTORY. 
Third Year. 



*T6kichi Yoshikuni. 
Shigekichi Kumamoto. 
Naokatsu Kagawa. 
Eikichi Kajikawa. 
Kikunosuke Kamihara. 
Hideoki Kimura. 
Daisaku Mitsui. 
Kanoe Chuma. 



Shin Shiraishi. 
Takashi Sakaguchi. 
Jitaro Imai. 
Naokichi Nakagawa. 
Yuji Fukuda. 
Kotaro Amagai. 
Naosaburo Hirota. 
Hanshiro Yagi. 



Second Year. 



Buhachiro Nakahara. 
Kengo Murakawa. 
EijirO Narukawa. 



Sutejiro Omura. 
Enkichi Kawai. 
Tatsuichi Ota. 



•Hononr Students, 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



MS 



Komakichi Takakuwa. 
Matasaburo Yasuoka. 
Tomezo Yasui. 
Atsutane Sakata. 



Toshiyuki Hada. 
Seigo Oda. 
Naosada Takai. 
Umazo Naito. 
Taro Yano. 
Tsutaye Matsumura. 
Hachiro Sawaragi. 
Rinzo Hirata. 



Genjiro Washio. 
Kenichi Sakamoto. 
Kiichiro Yoda. 



First Year. 



Masakazu Hori. 
Motozo Kono. 
Tomohiko Tabuchi. 
Kishizo Kuribayashi*. 
Jinichi Yano. 
Baiichi Komatsu. 
Matsunosuke Kitamura. 
Tetsusaburo Morita. 



COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY. 



*Katsuji Fujioka. 



Hisatane Okano. 
Michio Saigusa. 



Third Year. 



Konosuke Ikari. 



First Year. 



Nobutaka Fujisavva. 
Izuru Shinmura. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE. 



Third Year. 



Junji Nagaya. 
Rinktchi Tsuchii. 



*Bin Uyeda. 
Kosaburo I to. 



'Honour Students. 



246 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



*Gitaro Aoki. 
Tomoki Yoshimura. 



Second Year. 



Namiki Hayashi. 
Rio Nasukawa. 



First Year. 



Seijiro Ibaraki. 
Masayasu Tosawa. 
Yoshiji Watanabe. 
Kenkichi Yoshizawa. 
Torikuma Tanaka. 
Chigaya Makino. 
Koichiro Shiga. 



Kusuma Nishida. 
Masanobu Otani. 
Shibun Takahashi. 
Genshi Tatsuno. 
Tokinosuke Yamada. 
Wasaburo Asano. 
Rikitaro Suzuki. 



GERMAN LITERATURE. 



*Shinichiro Tobari. 



Third Year. 



Shokichi Aoki. 



Isami Kojima. 



Second Year. 



Nobukichi Fujii, 



Toshio Takagi. 
Yosuke Kanno. 



First Year. 



Akira Nakanome. 
Magotaro Shibata. 



'Honour Students. 



I 



LIST OF STUDENTS. I^'J 

FRENCH LITERATURE. 

First Year. 

Junkichi Nagasawa. Sh.unichiro Uyeda. 

Tomotoki Matsui. Kinzo Gorai. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 
PHILOSOPHY. 

Seizo Tsuji. Gikan Kin. 

Tetsuzo Okada. Shotaro Shibuya. 



CHINESE LITERATURE. 
Taisan Sugitani. Kushiro Akai. 



HISTORY. 
Namihachi Matsui. 



COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY. 
Tamaki Takemiya. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Meizo Togawa. Teizo Obana. 

Riuji Tanabe. Aribumi Sekiguchi. 



248 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



VI. College of Science. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Tsunenobu Fujita, Rigaku- 
shi. 

Shinzo Shinjo, Rigakushi, 

Jiita Hara, Rigakushi. 

Naomasa Yamasaki, Rigaku- 
shi, 

Tatsuo Aida, Rigakushi. 

Shizuo Sano, Rigakushi, 

Masayasu Hattori, Rigaku- 
shi, 



Usamaro Takakura, Rigaku- 
shi, 
Denjiro Suto, Rigakushi, 
Atsushi Yasuda, Rigakushi. 
Koichi Matsubara, Rigaku- 
shi, 
Takuji Ogawa, Rigakushi, 
Chinzo Tomoda, Rigakushi, 
Hanroku Yasaka, Rigakushi. 



MATHEMATJCS. 
Third Year. 



*Teiji Takagi. 
Takuji Yoshiye. 



*Tsuruichi Hayashi. 



Second Year. 



Senkichi Nakagawa. 
Yilya Takano. 
Rinzo Miwata. 



Hideo Okumura. 
Koji Omi. 
Sotojiro Fujita. 



Genjiro Hosokawa. 
Sadajiro Matsumura. 



First Year. 



Taninjiro Kariya. 
Rinzo Sato. 



* Honour Students. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



249 



ASTRONOMY. 

Third Year. 
Kiyotsugu Hirayama. Kanae Kitao. 



Motoji Kuniyeda. 



Tokuro Nakano. 



Second Year. 



First Year. 

Kiyofusa Saotome, 



*Kotaro Honda. 
Kiyoshi Kawakita. 
Kumajiro Hon jo. 



Ryokichi Otani. 
Mantaro Ito. 
Kenkichi Hagiwara. 
Kenji Yasukochi. 
Yoshio Shinjo. 
Sakuma Nagamura. 
Itaro Imai. 



Naokichi Idzu. 



PHYSICS. 
Third Year. 

Chunosuke Hiratsuka. 
Masataro Enya. 
Taroku Ikenaga. 

Second Year. 

Moritoshi Itabashi. 
•Tsunematsu Kume. 
Wasaburo Oishi. 
Sanshiro Tanaka. 
Kaika Kwanno. 
Torakichi Tahira. 

First Year. 

Kinnosuke Hayakawa. 



* Honour Student. 



25© 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 



Sakujiro Hamada. 
Yoshisaburo Kashiwagi. 
Shirio Kikukawa. 
Koki Yamakawa. 
Fujimaro Shimokobe. 
Shigeyoshi Hisa. 



Takematsu Okada. 
Sadajiro Yoshiraoto. 
Ikuo Kuwaki. 
Keisuke Sajima. 
Seizo Shimidzu. 
Sonosuke Mori. 



*Tokuhei Kametaka. 
Hitoshi Matsumoto. 
Toshio Hirata. 
Yasuji Ishida. 

Motooki Matsui. 
Ichizo Suganuma. 



Kadzu Imagawa. 
Shunzo Matsubara. 
Seijiro Kendo. 
Tarosuke Sasaki. 



CHEMISTRY. 

Third Year. 

*Ketsujiro Shirakabe. 
Yosaburo Shimidzu. 
Matsuo Fukui. 

Second Year. 

Mototsuchi Tanaka. 
Matasaburo Tsukamoto. 

First Year. 

Kiyoshi Ikeda. 
Toshitsura Majima. 
•Tsuneichi Goto. 
Masakichi Midzuta. 



ZOOLOGY. 

third year 

*Tokichi Nishikawa. Hisakichi VVatanabe. 

Shigeyasu Yoshiwara. Torata Takayama. 

Akira lidzuka. 



\ 



• Honour Students. 



f 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 25I 

BOTANY. 
Third Year. 

Fukutard Kono. Chiutaro Owatari. 



BIOLOGY. 
Second Year. 

Mikinosuke Miyajima. Tamaki Inui. 

First Year. 

Iwaji Ikeda. Hirotard Hattori. 

Naoe Ono. Keita Shibata. 



GEOLOGY. 
Third Year. 
Tsunenaga Iki. Hatsutaro Ishiwara. 

Second Year. 

Yeijiro Sagawa. Yudzuru Saito. 

Takeshi Hirabayashi. Chiutaro Kido. 

Chobei Aoyama. 

First Year. 

Seiyen Ishikawa. Tozo Takimoto. 

Magosaburo Yamashita. Masae Yagi. 

Shigeri Matsuda. Hirosaburo Fujishima. 
Shuho Hirose. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 
CHEMISTRY. 
YatarO Yakushiji. 



252 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



ZOOLOGY. 



Tomekichi Terasaki. 



BOTANY. 
Hitoshi Matsudaira. Hikotaro Nomura. 



Yqjiro Wakiya. 



ZOOLOGY. 

Kiichi Mivake. 



vn. College of Agriculture. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 
Homi Shirasawa Ringaku- Yeizaburo Uyeno, Nogaku- 

shi. shi. 

Yutaro Sasaki, Nogakushi. Junzo Omori, Nogakushi. 
Umetaro Suzuki, Nogakushi, KozaburoKume, Ringakushi. 
Naoshi Nitta, ynigakushi, Yoshinao Niijima, Ringaku- 

shi, 
Chotaro Harizuka, Nogaku- Tomeji Nakamura Nogaku^ 

shi, shi, 

Chugo Kobayashi, Nogaku- ChOjiro Ikeda, Nogakushi, 

shi. 

AGRICULTURE. 
Third Year. 
Yiitaro Ashizawa. Yasushi Ando. 

Yeijiro Uyeda. Rintaro Sasaki. 

Takeji Yoshida. Sumiaki Arima. 

Second Year. 
Shinitsu Yamane. Shinkichi Taguchi* 






LIST OF STUDENST. 255 

Osatsune Takami. Shunzo Kusakawa. 

Rokur5 Hatao. Teiichi Inouye. 

First Year. 
Tajiro Hosoda. Kikukichi Honda. 

Kamenoshin Kawasoye. Shunsuke Kusano. 

Hidegoro Asaba. Nisaku Arita. 

Tanejiro Saito. Kojiro Sugano. 

Tetsuzo Suda. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 
Third Year. 

♦Kotaro. Negami. Nobukichi Yamazaki. 

Seiki Takabayashi. 

Second Year. 

Kamechiyo Kikuchi. Genju Sasada. 

Shunsho Niino. Masaichi Horiuchi. 

Wachu Hisakado. 

First Year. 

Torazo Nishimura. Seicho Kono. 

Katsujiro Kawashima. Chutaro Yonemaru. 

Matsujiro Takeshita. Keijiro Aso. 



FORESTRY. 

Third Year. 

*Yutaro Iwakura. Suzuo Takei. 

Hiroshi Utsunomiya. Sabun Higuchi. 

Yoshimasa Wada. 



* Honour Students. 



254 ^'^"^ °^ STUDENTS. 

Kitaro Moroto. Atsufusa Nakamura. 

Tsunataro Nakajima. Kihei Okabe. 
Chuzaburo Mori. 

First Year. 

Shoitsu Hotta. Otokichi Watanabe. 

Yoshisuye Yoshida. Jisaburo Miwa. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE. 
Third Year. 
Takizo Mochizuki. Aizaburo Yamamoto. 

Second Year. 
Tasuku Yagi. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS 
AGRICULTURE. 
Bunji Kobari. Hirosaburo Uno. 



AGRICULTURAL CPIEMISTRY. 
Teikichi Takamuku. 



FORESTRY. 
Michitoshi Higashikuze 






A 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



255 



SUBSIDIARY COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Third Year. 



Denzo Nogi. 
Seiki Takano. 
Hajime Kamiya. 
Takeshi Uchino. 
Kumajiro Matsumura. 
Chiyomatsu Yamaze. 
Juhei Fukuda. 
Heisuke Homina. 
Kotaro Matsuo. 
Keitaro Matsuoka. 
Kumaichi Kaneko. 
Gentaro Yaginuma. 
Sojuro Shirasaka. 
Tetsushiro Tsumura. 



Wadachi Ota. 
Tsunematsu Fuse. 
Toyojiro Hamuro. 
Shigesaku Nakagomi. 
Kanzaburo Muraki. 
Umasuke Morishita. 
Genjiro Uchino. 
Torao Seki. 
Buichiro Okazaki 
Takesaburo Kyogoku. 
Kio Sawada. 
Katsusaburo Iwata. 
Seihachi Meguro. 



Seizo Kobayashi. 
Kanji Ushigome. 
Shoji Kusayanagi. 
Gakujiro Sakurai. 
Hamaji Naito. 
Torao Fujikawa. 
Masao Imamura. 
Kisaku Inouye. 
Motokichi Shimizu. 
Masakazu Kajima. 
Jiro Fuchi. 
Yaichiro Nishina. 
Toyojiro Nishida. 

Second Year. 

Saichiro Arai. 
Shogoro Hirajima. 
Tadao Uchibayashi. 
Jiro Takai. 
Seinoshin Uyeno. 
Mikinosuke Hatanaka. 
Kisaku Umeki. 
Katsuo Kavvamura. 
Seisuke Kawano. 
Shusai Hayashi. 
Fukuzo Tsunoda. 
Ichiro Kato. 



256 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



First Year. 



Masatake Ikeda. 
Kumakichi Iwamoto. 
Junji Niizuma. 
Choichi Orihara. 
Kunisaburo Oshima. 
Masao Ono. 
Kennosuke Ohashi. 
Tadashi Yoshitomi. 
Susumu Tawara. 
Toranosuke Tsuneishi. 
Riuzo Nakagawa. 
Kinjiro Yamakoshi. 
Shusuke Matsumoto. 
Rikichi Kondo. 
Toyoharu Arima. 
Iwakichi Asada. 
Tadashi Konoura. 
Masazo Miyamoto. 



Koshin Iwamoto. 
Shigesuye Nishi. 
Inroku To. 
On Okada. 
Kosaburo Ono. 
Shotaro Okamura. 
Zenjuro Kajihara. 
Jitsuta Yokoi. 
Ryosaku Someya. 
Seiji Nakamura. 
Kokichi Nakandakare. 
Chuji Matsuyama. 
Aikuma Matsushita* 
Iwaichi Kobayashi. 
Kuniji Aoki. 
Masaji Saito. 
Kojiro Miyata. 
Keijiro Miyama. 



SUBSIDIARY COURSE IN FORESTRY. 



Fujiro Chikashige. 
Yoshitaka Kunita. 
Ibun Hakugoku. 
Tokutaro Hirose. 
Ikuya Takaoka. 
Ryuji Uchida. 



TiiiRD Year. 



Katsuzo Saito. 
Kazumitsu Masaki. 
Sampachiro Yamashita. 
Takanobu Ishiwara. 
Ihachiro Okada. 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



257 



Second Year. 



Handa Matsumura. 
Yoma Kitamura. 
Otokichi Chikazawa. 
Tsunejiro Kawajiri. 
GitarS Yoshida. 
Takeshi Kasai. 



Tokuo Kanosuye. 
Mokichi Kondo. 
Ryosaku Ota. 
Yoshizo Yanagida. 
Tatsuo Nambu. 



First Year. 



Tateo Ida. 
Shosuke Harada. 
Shuichiro Gyama. 
Haruo Kawada. 
Suzukichi Kanaiwa. 
Mikitaro Kurokawa. 
Wasaku Yabe. 
Chikoya Fukuda. 
Kiyoshi Saito. 
Yoshinaka Jikoji. 



Tsunekichi Hagiwara. 
Araji Koyama. 
Shinichi Okada. 
Kazarii Kawate. 
Kiyoshi Takamizawa. 
Yoshitsugu Kusunoki. 
Gensaku Fujiyeda. 
Naoyoshi Yehashi. 
Masao Kitamura. 
eijiro vShirai. 



> 



SUBSIDIARY COURSE IN VETERINARY 

MEDICINE.* 



Third Year. 



Naokichi Kawashima. 
Kinpei Shimizu. 
Yeiji Nakagaki. 



Noboru Kunishige. 
Hamajiro Miyamoto. 



'258 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Second Year. 



Genkichi Tanaka. 
Shigeju Sawamoto. 
Takajiro Furuta. 
lin Inami. 
Daizaburo Yuasa. 
Shigezo Tqjo. 
Yutaro Chihara. 
Banzo Miyanaga. 



Seiye Irimajiri. 
Kakujiro Ishida. 
Chojiro Kuwabara. 
Shohei Goto. 
Gentaro Shiga. 



Kunijiro Takahashi. 
Tsunejiro Morishita. 
Masamichi Kajima. 
Seiya Nakamura. 
Tomoyoshi Mii. 
Ichiro Takahashi. 
Seisuke Chishiki. 



First Year. 



Matsuichi Ishibashi. 
Naoya Takano. 
Kikuma Yamaoka. 
Shigenobu Miyazaki. 






XXI. JilST OP GAKUSHI AND OTHER 

GRADUATES. 



^ 



Tokyo Daig£Lku. 
HOGAKUSHL 



Yearot 
Gradaation. 






1878 Tetsujir6 Nishikawa. Takasaburo Fujita. 

" Kinichi Kawakami. Shigeaki Hatakeyama. 

" tChinkichi Nomura. Masahisa Motoyama. 

1879 RokuichirO Masujima. Kamasaburo Ghara. 

" tBiichirO Oyagi. " fKazumasa Takahashi. 

** Hakaru Isono. Genzo Akiyama. 

Yutaro Yamashita. Michinari Suyenobu. 

tHisanori Miyake. 

i88o MichisaburoMiyasaki. Hajime Motoda. 

" fSaburo Murayama. KinzaburO Ono. 

" Takanosuke Iriye. fChojiro Kase. 

188 1 Takaaki Kato. Masakata Akiyama. 
" tMasamichi Aikawa. iGentaro Okada. 

*' tTeiichiro Matsuno. Busaburo Yii. 

" Mitsuyoshi Suzuki. tSakichi Sakaguchi. 

** Sansei Uchida. 

1882 Yasushi Hijikata. Kamenosuke Misaki» 
** Katsutaka Sunagawa. Kinosuke Yamada. 

" tAsaka Watanabe. fChikamoto Miwa. 

** tKanekichi Okayama. Moroyoshi Ihara. 

t Dead. 



26o 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUTES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1883 Junrokuro Shiba. 

** Sukeyuki Hiyama. 
tSeitaro Katayama. 
Jun Isobe. 

1884 Makoto Yegi. 
** Komataro Kosaka. 
'* Yoshitaro Arakawa. 

1885 Suteroku Takahashi. 
Ikunoshin Tanaka 
Seijiro Sho. 
Shiro Fujita. 
tZoji Shi buy a. 



tt 



It 



i( 



n 



it 



a 



Teiji Ito. 
+T6ichi Nishio. 
Naohiko Seki. 
Tokutaro Ono. 
Yoshito Oku da. 
Katsu Kitadai. 
Toshikazu Ishiwata. 
Genji Baba. 
Heitaro Tsubono. 
Sjeizo Tanokanii. 
Yasutaro Ota. 
fjunsaku Hirabe* 



Teikoku Daigaku. 
HOGAKUSHI. 



LAW (1ST 

1886 Shumpei Uyemura. 
*' Keijiro Okano. 

** Kikuwaka Sakakibara. 
** tSukenori Ito. 
** Akichika Hanyu. 

1887 Tsunejiro Miyaoka. 
** Kaku Takahashi. 

1888 Kiichiro Hiranuma. 
*' Kanieji Shibahara. 

** Tsunetaro Shionoya. 



SETTION.)* 

Hiroto Tomizu. 
Nagayasu Oinuma. 
Rainosuke Sawasaki. 
Fushi Inui. 
Seigo Nakano. 
Tsunehide Ishii. 

Joyei Hirata. 
Riutaro Koide. 
Aishichi Tanahashi. 



• Those who selected English Law (see p. 68). 
t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUTES. 



261 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Kenjiro Komatsu. 
" Munekoto Suzuki. 
" Shin Sato. 

1889 KatsutarO Inuzuka. 
" Shigetaka SaitO. 

** Ujito Hiraishi. 

'* Sadatsuchi Uchida. 

^' Keishiro Matsui. 

** Saburo Kamiya. 

*• Sentaro Hirayama. 

** Kojiro Isodani. 

** Iwao Aoki. 

" Reijiro Kato. 

** Torajiro Yoshizaki. 

** Sakichi Yoshida. 

" Kinichi Fukuda. 

1890 Kad6 Hara. 

" Kikujiro Ishii. 

*' Sadasuke Akiyama. 

** Ichisuke Nakagawa. 

** Hirokichi Nakaya. 

** Kumaji Takenouchi. 

*< Kinkichi Nakada. 

^* Kokichi Kitsuki. 

** K5taro Serizawa. 

** Fujitaro Otori. 

^* Chosaku Miyake. 

** Kichiro Hirose. 

" Tetsusaburo Kano. 
1890 Tamaki Nagai. 

" Hozo Ushioda. 



Kumaji Oshima. 
Kingo Kakizaki. 



Seiichi Kishi. 
Tpmotetsu Asakura. 
Ryuzu Tanaka. 
Hayakichi Sato, 
Tozo Kanzaki. 
Ichitaro Shimizu. 
Chiyosaburo Takeda. 
Kiyohiko Nakamura. 
Chiyosaburo Watanabe. 
Kenzo Ishiwara. 
Kogoro Terashima. 
Manjiro Matsuoka. 

Kamon Shibata. 
On Oyama. 
Masanosuke Akiyama. 
Hikokichi Ijuin. 
Kotard Shimada. 
Shinichiro Yamada. 
Koriki Fujita. 
Umazo Hotta. 
Masaya Okazaki. 
Yonetaro Okuma. 
Nobuo Tomishima. 
Harukichi Urushibata, 
Hikosuke Kawase. 
Shuntoku Yoneda. 
Yeikichi Tsunematsu. 



262 



Y^ar of 
Graduation 



JLIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUTES. 



1890 Masajiro Hayashi. 
October 1890 Takeki Masuda. 

1891 Seitaro Kubota. Kakichi Uchida. 
Yasaburo Kawamura. Kumao Maruyama, 
Kannosuke Kimura. Morio Nakamatsu. 
Kiuma Tomizuka. Hikosaburo Shinba. 
tKichinosuke Shimizu Ujimoto Ishida. 
Kishichiro Oka. Sukeya Aibara. 
Genkichi Kuratani. Heikichi Takenouchi* 
Motoye Narita. Masatomi Hirano. 
Tomigoro Kuroyanagi' Kinjiro Hayashi. 



H 
it 
H 
li 



1892 Rentaro Mizuno. 
Yoshito Takane. 
Hikomaro Fuwa. 
Yenjiro Yamaza. 
Mitsuomi Nambu. 
Kotaro Yokoyama. 
Naohiko Masaki. 
► tShioichi Suwa. 
Yeijiro Hida. 
Sadataro Hiraoka. 
Sakao Kitasato. 
Sadaaki Umemura. 



(( 



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it 



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II 



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Riojiro Fukuhara. 
Kikuo Aoki. 
Shigekazu Nozoye. 
Toshio Matsumura* 
Kwanzo Kuzu. 
Motojiro Shiraishi. 
Shinichi Kasai. 
Yutaro Hirano. 
Masakazu Hisata. 
Tetsuzo Yamazaki, 
Takezo Nakamura. 
Toranosuke Okita. 
Yeijuro Hayashi. 



Genichiro Kugo. 
February 1893 Gonjiro Tokuda. 
1893 Niichiro Matsunami. Tainosuke Shibata. 
Keiichir6 Kitamura. Yeitaro Mabuchi. 
Tomoichi Inouye. Shiro Matsuda. 

Yoshikoto Nakamura. Kametaro lijima. 



I ( 



(I 



it 



. i 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



263 



Year of 

Graduation. 

1893 tlsaburo Kashiwagi. 
Sahachi Iwanaga. 
Kiyomaro Sasaki. 
Tatsuz5 Okano; 
Takeo Matsudera, 



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Tsunakichi Niwa. 
Shinji Hori. 
Tamezo Hisamoto. 
Keijiro Hori. 
Toshiyuki Takahashi. 



TsunesaburoMiyasaki. Keizo Tanabe. 



Heisaburo Kimura. 
Tokitar5 Imai. 
Sentaro Ichikawa. 
Takeji Takikiki. 



Choichiro Mihama. 
Toyojiro Suganuma. 
Tsunesaburo Nagata. 
Gosaku Miyamoto. 



Torazo Nishida. 
October 1893 Shoko Okudaira, 
1894 Santaro Okamatsu. Tamesaburo Tamaki, 
** Miyozo Nakayama. 
Ichiro Haruki. 



(( 



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it 



(I 



li 



<( 



(I 



li 



a 



tt 



it 



ti 



Isotatsu Kajiwara. 
Teikichi Wani. 
Kotaro Shida. • 
Gontaro Takabe. 
lyetoshi Sada. 
Tomokuma Sato. 
Genzo Kobayashi. 
Suketada Ito. 
Shikiro Suizu. 



Tetsukichi JCurachi. 
fOrigoro Hikida. 
Keisaburo Usami. 
Tomonobu Fujisaki. 
Yaichi Fujise. 
Keisaburo Haniu. 
Kizo Ogawa. 
Seizo Shishido. 
Yasutaro Takatori. 
Tomizo Takata. 
Chunosuke Yemura. 



Rikinosuke Miyamoto. Kosaku Hattori. 



Sankuro Kusakabe. 
T895 Hisaakira Hijikata. 
" Kingoro Kawamura. 
Yutaka Tawara. 



a 



Shiotaro Yamanaka. 
Chotaro Seino. 
Riokichi Kato. 
Yoshiharu Tadokoro. 



f Dead. 



264 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1895 Shuichi Hagiwara. 
Goroku Honda. 
Yoshio Aoki. 
Mitsunoshin Kami- 

yama. 
Kijuro Shidehara. 
Shinzo Hirai. 



u 



<( 



(( 



<( 



(f 



4i 



it 



4i 



Kunisaburo Tanaka. 
MotoshirO Kato. 
Toku Nomura. 
Kanichi Kayama. 

Heijiro Hida. 
Kiyonari Aikawa. 



Shigeyuki Hashimoto. Tamaki Sekiguchi. 
Yonetaro Yokomura. Mochiyoshi Nakanishi. 



Magoichi Tawara. 
Isaburo Takagi. 
Minaji Seki. 
Shinichi Yoshida. 
Tetsujiro Kumagai. 
KeishirO Imafuji. 
Ryosaku Morii. 
Koko Suyenaga. 
Kitaro Matsuda. 
Yutaka Ota. 
1896 Yojiro Kashiwabara. 
Komasaburo Shibata. 
Chiuichi Ariyoshi. 
Takashi Isaka. 
Tomonosuke Kano. 
f Masaharu Matsuo. 
Itaro Miki. 
YagorO Miura. 
Tetsukichi Shimada. 
SamurO Yamada. 



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Seijiro Tanaka. 
Tokuji Ibukiyama. 
Komaye Ikegami. 
Kumataro Sakurai. 
Masuo Asayama. 
TorasaburO Matsuura. 
Yeigoro Shimoyama. 
Shusuke Yamamoto. 
Seizo Ohashi. 

Junnosuke Inouye. 
Yojir5 Takahashi. 
Kanejiro Suzuki. 
Akira Sakaya. 
Bungoro Takahashi. 
Jisaburo Sekiguchi. 
ShOnosuke Nakumo. 
Katsusaburo Watanabe. 
Miichiro Orihara. 
Kanichiro Matsuki. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



265 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1896 Kinpei Takenouchi. 
Tokitaro Anju. 
Yeitaro Hi rasa. 
Chotaro Nishimura. 
Mitsuyasu Fujimoto. 
Kurd Matsuzawa. 
Samuro Merita. 
Komajiro Sakurai. 
Akira Kimura. 
Keishiro Takeshima. 
Yasuyoshi Kurokane. 
Goro Matsugata. 
Otoo Sakata. 
Sadakichi Sekine. 
Junjiro Kato. 
Yukitomo Koga. 
Shinataro Kotake. 



i< 



i( 



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(( 



ti 



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tl 



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Norinari Miyake. 
Takenosuke Ogura. 
Tenta Nakahara. 
Kojiro I to. 
Shinji Mizuhara. 
Shichita Tatsuke. 
Shintaro Ishida. 
Jokichi Shibahara. 
Toyotaro Matsui. 
Yuichi Ito. 
Kiichiro Tokunaga. 
Heizo Maruoka. 
Gentaro Kaku. 
Mataji Tsuda. 
Keizo Nobuto. 
Tatsno Miura. 
Masato Urano. 



LAW (2ND SECTION.)* 



1888 Kazuma Jo. 

Hikoroku Morozumi. 
Ritsuo Tashiro. 
Tomosaburo Kinoshita 
Shinzo Kamijio. 
Nobuhide Matsudaira. 
tSeiseki Fukui. 



ti 



tt 



tt 



tt 



tt 



tt 



Hideo Yokota. 
Minesaburo Ota. 
Takekuma Kakihara. 
Chuzo Okura. 
Chuji Yendo. 
Katsunosuke Nakayama. 
Kokiii Mizukami. 



 Those who selected French Law (see p. 69). 
J Dead. 



266 LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 

Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Yeizaburo Kamei. 
Matsutaro Itakura. 
tSanyu Hon. 
Seisuke Kataoka. 
Shigemori Fujita. 
Ichirosuke Ishio. 
Fujio Itagaki. 
Sonosuke Yamamoto. 
Seiichi Hara. 
Kinichiro Ishikavva. 
fShiro Takita. 

1889 Saburo Yoshiwara. 
" tKotaro Kamiyama. 

i8go Suketoki Ota. 

Keikichi Motohashi. 
Kyu2aburo Yasuda. 



f( 



<( 



it 



(( 



If 



it 



(( 



(( 



(I 



n 



n 



n 



Masane Kawata. 
Tokichiro Nagamori. 
Kinetaro Kusaka. 
Hiyokichi Mizumoto. 
Naohide Kameyama. 
Fujimaro Tsuda. 
Keijiro Tamaki. 
Shigemasa Machida. 
Ko Oto. 
Terunosuke Watanabe. 

Kesaroku Mizumachi. 

Michisaburo Miyashita. 
Keijiro Matsumoto. 

Asataro Okada. 



1891 Kisaburo Suzuki. 

Kikunosuke Nakamura. Hideshiro Tanaka. 
Michinori Hamada. Tamana Kito. 
Haruki Sato. Katsuji Yanagawa. 

Takekichi Matsunaga. Genji Kurobane. 
Shigesaburo Ide. 
November 189 1 tYuichiro Takahashi. 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



t( 



1992 Reijiro Wakatsuki. 
Kentaro Arai. 
Yorozu Ota. 
Tsukasa Okamura. 
ShojirO Zen. 
Heijiro Teshima. 



(( 



(f 



(( 



<f 



li 



MineichirO Adachi. 
Yoshiyuki Iriye. 
Keisabur6 Miyako. 
tTsunemaru Takafuji. 
Nobutaro Kajiyama. 
tKenkichi Yamanaka. 



t Dead 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUTES. 



267 



Year of 

Graduation. 

1992 Yoshimasa Matsuoka. 
Kenji Hatano. 
Heikichi Ogawa. 
Hachiro Mine. 
Riota Yukimori. 
Tamotsu Sampei. 
Jirokichi Yamaga. 

1893 Kio Matsuoka. 
Kanzaburo Katsumoto. 
Masataka Mori. 
Shige Kobayashi. 
Motoo Yukawa. 
Kanko Motoda. 
Shigeru Tsukui. 
Kaichi Saradani. 
Takeshichi Tamura. 

1894 Toru Shimizu. 
** Kwako Nakamura. 

1895 Mikio Kato. 
Jitaro Tsuji. 
Kodo Nishikubo. 

1896 Shigeyasu Suzuki. 



(( 



<( 



tt 



it 



II 



II 



II 



II 



II 



II 



II 



ii 



II 



II 



II 



11 



Teijiro Tsutsumi. 
Rintaro Asami. 
Rennosuke Tsuzumi. 
Motoo Fujinami. 
Nariyoshi Mayesawa. 
Hideharu Tsuji. 



Kikuma Munai. 
Kimitaro Shinoda. 
Kumaichi Horiguchi. 
Heikuro Miyamoto. 
Yeiichi. Hori, 
Tsunezo Kusunoki. 
Koichi Nakayama. 

Komao Matsuda. 
Tadakichi Abe. 
Yeitaro Asai. 
Shu Okada. 



LAW (3RD SECTION.)* 

1890 Kwankichi Yukawa. Masgharu Isobe. 
** Kinichi lino. Kinosuke Amano. 



i . 



* Those who selected German Law (see p. 68). 



268 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1890 Mokichi Morita. 
** Rinpei Otsu. 

" tKinzaburo Hashi. 

zume. 
** Hatsuichiro Oko. 
" Ryuji Otsuki. 
** Hikoichi Ogane. 
** Kei Ishikawa. 

189 1 Juichiro Saito. 

** Tatsutarq Tsuchiya. 
** Soichi Sakaguchi. 
** Misao Kumakura. 

1892 Juzaburo Ikeda. 
" Isami Noda. 

** Masakichi Saigo. 
" Tamotsu Nakao. 
" Jiujiro Murai. 

1893 Masutaro Niida. 
" KiyoshiA be. 

'* Takeyuki Ishikawa. 
" Zenzaburo Kanno. 

1894 Shingo Nakamura. 
** Giichi Soyejima. 

" Sagaichiro Maruyama. 
** Chuzaburo Seda. 

1895 Masachika Kubota. 
" Tatsujiro Tsukada. 
" Keitar6 Matsuda. 
" Seitaro Nakayama. 



Washitaro Nagashima. 
Kinezo Hattori. 
Ryotaro Hata. 

Nagayoshi Yasumura. 
Hyokichi Masuda. 
tKozaburo Mochida. 
Shigeru Iwamura. 
Sansaku Satomi. 
Kanechiyo Nishiyama. 
Shozo Nihei. 
Tomokichi Ishibashi. 
Mitsu Inouye. 
Hiko Yamamoto. 
Riutaro Hayashi. 
Sadataro Itomi. 
Keisaku Kobori. 
Kamematsu Niho. 
Naoshi Kaneko. 
Shigeru Matsui. 

Wakatsu Matsuoka. 
Muneyoshi Tatsuno. 
Yohachi Miyata. 
Shinichiro Shizume. 
Naomichi Toshima. 
Yeitaro Suzuki. 
Iwatar6 Otagiri. 
Tokio Hayashi. 



f Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



269 



Year of 
Graduation. 



It 



ti 



Ichiro Iwata. 
Yoshizo Ochiai. 
1896 Shunji Miyao. 
GorO Furukawa. 



(I 



It 



Keizo Kawada. 

Kaizaburo Miyoshi. 
Seiichi lida. 



Tsugumune Tamaga- Genji Sekine. 



wa. 



Tokyo Hdgakko- 



HORITSUGAKUSHI. 



1876 Shioichi Inouyc. 

Shiro Isobe. 

Hiroji Kinoshila. 

Tatsuo Kishimoto. 

Hoken Kabuto. 

jNaosuke Naito. 

Seiji Oshima. 

Sadayoshi Kameyama. 

Hanzaburo Hashimo- 
to. 

Shiojiro Ida. 

Churio Fujibayashi. 

Naomichi Fukuhara. 

Nariyoshi Otsuka. 
1884 Kenjiro Ume. 

Satsuo Akizuki. 

Joichiro Tsuru. 

Shiotaro Fujitani. 

Mihomatsu Komiya. 

t Dead. 



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II 



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tt 



tt 



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Binzo Kumano. 
Seigo Kurizuka. 
tKozo Miyagi. 
Hisashi Ogura. 
Tetsusaburo Kinoshita. 
So Inouye. 
Shinpei Iwano. 
Toyozo Takagi. 
Yusaburo Ichinose. 

Toraichi Sugimura. 
Raizo Tatsuki. 
+ So Yashiro. 

JozaburO Kawamura. 
Kazuhisa Sakurai. 
Tar6 Tezuka. 
Kokwai Mayeda. 
Ho Tanabe. 



270 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1884 Moriyoshi Tsurumi. 
Toru Terao. 
jKan Kuribara. 
Tan Shigata. 
Sadanobu Ogasawara. 
Ichiro Shimizu. 
Renzo Koga. 
Shiku Kasuga. 
Keijun Yamazaki. 
Kiuhei Hirashima. 
Tetsukichi Ogawa. 
Genseki Suyehiro. 



Kenyeki Kawamura. 
Kosaku lida. 
Sosen Yoncmura. 
Itashi Matsumuro. 
Yemota Ono. 
Jiujiro Kakeshita. 
jTerumoto Ikeda. 
Chojiro Mizukami. 
Cho Watanabe. 
Takuken Momochi. 
Hikoji Kono, 



GRADUATES WHO ARE NOT GAKUSHI. 



1884 Jun Ikebe. 
** Sekijiro Ishizuka. 



Sukeyuki Morita. 
Kunsei Sakabe. 



Teikoku-Daigaku. 



HOGAKUSHI. 
POLITICS. 

1886 tFujiro Sagane, 

1887 Kitokuro Ikki. Kosai Uchida. 

** Senkichiro Hayakawa. Gonsuke Hayashi. 
". Tomosada Asada. Kametaro Hayashida, 

" Masaya Suzuki. Kanichi Oba. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



271 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Jushiro Kiuchi. 
'* Kazuye Ito. 

" Yeki Hiokf. 

'* Masakichi Miyazaki. 

" Sadakichi Suzuki. 

** Kinjiro Takemura. 

** Sasuke Oura. 

1889 Gentaro Shimura. 
** KiyOtaro Tsuda. 

** Nagabumi Ariga. 
** Hajime Ota. 
** Tetsujiro Shidachi. 
** Naonosuke Kawakami. 

1890 Yeizo Ishizuka. 

'* Usaburo Yanagiya. 
** Tomegoro Taniguchi. 
'* Yukei Yoshii. 
** tShohachiro Hirasa- 

wa. 
** Tetsutaro Sakurai. 
** Isamu Kubo. 

Yasaburo Nomura. 
*' Otoya Banno. 
" Ichiji Yamanouchi 
" Sukeyoshi Soga. 
** Junnosuke Takatsuki. 
" Kurajiro Suzuki. 
" Shotaro Nishizawa. 

1891 Kanetaro Yamamoto. 



Kuranosuke Matsuzaki. 
Torajrro Nomura. 
tToshiyuki Haraguchi. 
SaijirC Takei. 
Kanaye Tozawa. 
Shokichi Yamaguchi. 

Tetsutaro Aoki. 
Kakujiro Yamazaki. 
Sentaro Kaneko. 
Yashisaburo Susaki. 
Kine Tomohira. 

Ichiyo Tsukuda. 
Tatsukuro Inouye. 
Takejiro Tokonami. 
Keizaburo Hashimoto. 
tKoichiro Horiye. 

Kusuyata Kimura. 
Anbun Sawaki. 
Ryusuke Rinoiye. 
Kotaro Y'endo. 
Bintaro Matsui. 
Takeshi Shirani. 
Ginnosuke Yamazaki. 
Mankichi Suwa. 
Seisuke Kamiro. 
Masanori Muraki. 



t Dead 



272 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



Seisaku Suzuki. 



1 89 1 Kazuyoshi Yagiii, 
" Hisajiro Sewaki. 

1892 t Kinzaburo Inanami. Tatsumi Iwai. 
Teiza^uro Matsuki. Sukesada Kudo. 



Kiichiro Kumagai. 
Tatsusaburo Akiu. 
Hin Wakimoto. 

1893 jMoriye Mayeda. 
Hachiji Kuwabara. 
Yasoi Ishikawa. 
Taizo Shimohira. 
Kojiuro Nakagawa. 
Yoshiharu Yoshida. 
Takeichi Kikuchi. 
Kumazo Kuwada. 
Kuninojo Ishiwata. 
Yojiro Nakamura. 
Hajime Ishikawa. 
Raizo Wakabayashi. 

1894 Sakuye Takahashi. 
Naoya Akuzawa. 
Jir6 Asoo. 
Naoya Takenouchi. 
Riujiro Kawamura. 
Naoyoshi Nagai. 
Taro Ura. 
Kinsaku Yoshida. 
Yeihiko Shirasaka. 
Teizo Iwasa. 



Kennosuke Tsuneoka. 
Shiutaro ltd. 

Rokusaburo Mochichi. 
Shunkichi Minobe. 
Onotaro Kiutoku. 
Komao Ikebe. 
tToraji Tamagawa. 
Motojiro Takata. 
tMatsutaro Tamura. 
Unkichi Mayeda. 
Saburo Obata. 
Tsunamaru Hashimoto. 
Natsuo Hashimoto. 
Sukeroku Oshima. 

mji Tajima, 
tTomoichiro Izeki. 
Tdtaro Shimosaka. 
Kiyosuke Awazu. 
Sohei Kone. 
Ushisaburo Kobayashi. 
Rioichi Yano. 
Shigoro Ogawa. 
Shunzuchi Fukuhara. 
Chojiro Inui. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



273 



Year o« 
Graduation. 




1894 Yunosuke Nishinohara. 


Mosuke Matsumura. 


" Takahide Yoshikawa. 


Hiroshi Yalta. 


** Heijiro Umeno. 


Atsuyoshi Fukushima. 


" Torao Ikeda. 


Shigetoshi Matsuki. 


** Toma Noda. 


Chujiro Okabe. 


" Uhei Fujii. 


Tsunao Suda. 


*^ Kanetaro Katsura. 


Yoshiaki Watanuki. 


1895 Kiheiji Onozuka. 


Shigetaro Nakashima. 


*^ Osaji Hamaguchi. 


Chuji Shimooka. 


" Yeizo Yahagi. 


Iwasaburo Takano. 


** Katsumi Kubota. 


Junji Koyama. 


** Kentaro Ochiai. 


Fukuta Mizukawa. 



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Kamemitsu Yamamoto. Kazuye Shoda. 
Toyoji Yoshii. Seizo Nagahama. 

Shosaku Okubo. Shikuo Yamada. 

Tokiji Nakanishi. Takujiro Hori. 

Kinsaburd Ogasawara. Michitaka Sugawara. 



Tokusaburo Kano. 
Takaoki Yokoyama. 
Shigeto Sawada. 
Hisazo Matsuzaki. 
Takio Izawa. 
1896 Teijiro Katayama. 
Otohlko Ichiku. 
Katsuo Usami. 
Yooroku Yamazaki. 
Yoshio Watanabe. 
Toyosuke Hata. 
Chozo Koike. 
Rokuro Noroi. 
Tetsutaro Shimizu. 



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Tomomi Hara. 
Masanori Hirai. 
Sutesaburo Hashizume* 
Masuo Saiki. 
Tatsutaro Takahashi. 
Katsunosuke Kanno. 
Norihiko Yatsushiro. 
Moritaro Abe. 
Yeiichi Kudo. 
Saishiro Sakikawa. 
Masakichi Kobayashi. 
Tsunenosuke Hamada. 
Takakichi Ariyoshi. 
Shunsuke Ito. 



274 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 

Gradaation. 

1896 Isao Hayakawa. 
Hiroshi Minami. 
f Kiichi Yemura. 
Saisho Takata. 
Akira Ishii. 
Yushu Takata. 
Yuzo Tanaka. 
Hidekuma Tsuru. 
Hiroji Tsuzuki. 






Tokutaro Nonaka. 
Senkichi Ohara. 
Ichizo Hayashi. 
Sukesaburo Ishimaru. 
Sadagusu Tomura. 
Chuzaburo Kikuchi. 
Rentaro Fukamachi. 
Torataro Migita. 
Komatsuchi Ohira. 



Tokyo Daigaka. 



IGAKUSHI. 



MEDICINE. 



1876 tKando Kawano. 
Washichiro Ota. 
tChusen Ishikawa. 
tTetsuzo Suda. 
tKenzo Mitsuma. 
Genkei Oka. 
Hogara Uno. 
tGentei Matsuzawa. 
Yasuji Noguchi. 
Junjiro Hasegawa. 
Atsuyoshi Ono. 



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Teijun Yoshida. 
Noboru Hamano. 
Rokuro Muroga. 
Taisuke Yamazaki. 
Genshu Yamazaki. 
tYutaka Harad9. 
Jun Sugano. 
Seiken Miura. 
Teijiro Watanabe. 
Koichi Miura. 
Ikujiro Sakurai. 



t Dead 



JLIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



^7]) 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1876 Ryoyeki Nakamura. 

** Sdhei Okawa. 

1879 tikutard Shimizu. 

** Jiro Shindo. 

** Isamu Kiyono. 

*• Keiyo Tazawa. 

** Chimata Kono. 

*• Kuniyoshi Katayama. 

** tBuni Sasaki. 

** Gentan Kumagai. 

** Kanji Uozumi. 

" tYuki Jinnai. 
18S0 Gentatsu Hamada. 

'* Masanori Ogata. 

** Morio Ito. 

** Hidekata Tomono. 

** Yh Sugita. 

'* Cho Hirota. 

*' Konosuke Suzuki. 

** tTeikichi Numanami. 

** tRinsuke Toyama. 
188 1 Moriji Miura. 

** Toichiro Nakahama. 

'* Tasuku Sato. 

** Tasuku Kono. 

** Masanao- Koike. . 

** Aritsune Yamagata. 

** Kichiro Ibara. 

" Tomokata Morinaga. 



tGentoku Indo. 

Masakichi Sasaki. 
Tsunekichi Torikata. 
Chiho Omori. 

• 

+Kinnoj6 Mume. 
Uchuji Ishiguro. 
Rokichi Nonami. 
Seizo Kumagai. 
flchinosuke Sato. 
Keihon Takashina. 
Yeisuke Nakarai. 
Yoshikiyo Koganei. 
Hajime Sakaki. 
Hiroshi Kobayashi. 
JOgoro Ise. 
Seiichi Nagao. 
tTomojiro Kanda. 
Koichi Ishikawa. 
Yukiyoshi Suga. 

Juntaro Takahashi. 
tl Ibe. 

Yoshimoto Katayama. 
Rintaro Mori. 
Konosuke Kumagai. 
Nakaki Yamagata. 
Ken Taniguchi. 
Yoshichird Yenomoto. 



I Dead. 



276 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation 

1881 tMasamichi Nakamura. fRyutaro Sano. 
" Genichiro Narasaka. Tsunesaburo Kikuchi^ 



({ 



Riotei Shingu. 
Kakusho Kako. 
Kohei Nagamachi. 
tShinjun lida, 
Riogo Oikawa. 
1882 Tsunenaga Sakamota 
Jiro Nogawa. 
Sankichi Sato. 
Shod Shibata. 
Shikanosake Inoko. 



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Kento Tominaga. 



Junzo Asakawa. 
Kaiji Ogura. 
f Shigeki Kumagai. 
Shiijiro Ogata. 
Makoto Aiso. 
Kenzo Totsuka. 
Yo Yendo. 
Senya Saito. 
1883 Jujiro Kmoto. 
Shuichi Uchida. 
Tamenobu Saito. 
Tsune Iso. 
Yoichi Ikeda. 
Kenkichi Urashima. 
Churio Nakayama. 
Kozo Kimura. 



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Bunsuke Jinbo* 
Isaku Uozumi. 
J6 Yegnchi. 
Kango Shimada. 
Takeo Kajima. 
Fumitane Takagi. 
Sakaye Furukawa. 
Tanemichi Aoyama. 
Shogi Segawa. 
Ren §ato. 
Yataro Ota. 
Tadasu Tashiro. 
Todo Yoshimasu. 
Yoshinori Saigo, 
Susumu Yoshimura* 
Shoji Yamane. 
Masao Jinnaka. 
Kozo Yoshida. 

Shuan Otani. 
Muneo Kumakawa. 
Hiroshi Kawahara. 
Shibasaburo Kitasato. 
Moriyasu Takahashi. 
liunsaku Yamane. 
Taro Ogata. 
Ko Sasaki* 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSMI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



277 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1883 tShuichi Ozawa. 

t Toy at a Iwasa. 

Shunpo Chihara. 

Jiro Minami. 

Hiromu Asada. 
1884. fKentard Murata. 

Ikujiro Asayama. 

Tadao Honda. 

Riu MuAakata. 

Tomei Kurimoto. 

Rokuzo Ogiu. 

Jirohei Yamamoto. 
1885 Teiichi Kashiwamura. 

Noritomo Masugi. 

Yasuo Sawabe. 

Senmatsu Amaya. 

tHidetaro Hoshino. 

Doyii Okuda. 

Hideji Gnishi. 

Takashi Hidaka. 

Gentei Harada. 



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Yooya Kawamata. 
Heizaburd Tsuruzaki. 
Koichird Riu. 
tOtoya Manabe. 
Seiichiro Kuroyanagi. 
f Kiyoshi Matsuzaki. 
Shunkichi Miyashita. 
Kanji Hasegawa. 
tGenun Kijima. 
Heishiro Yamazaki. 
Bunzo Oka. 

Jiro Tsuboi. 
Heizo Inouye. 
Homare Sano. 
Tomoye Takagu 
f Mantaro Kamada. 
Gonsaburo Inano. 
Teikichi Suganuma. 
Kagauji Hara. 



«i 



SEIYAKUSHI. 



1878 Junichiro Shimoyama. Keizo Tamba. 
tManabu Yoshida. Sai Oyama. 
SamurO Takahashi. Masujiro Takahashi. 



it 



It 



t Dead. 



278 LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES* 

Year of 
Graduation. 

1878 Tokichiro Niwa. fTokutaro Mimura. 
" tYoshihiro Notomi. 

1879 Koheida Sakurai. Jiro Sohe. 

** Osamu Fujimoto. Shinichi Nonli. 

** Kdichi Shimada. To Yamada. 

** Tsunesuke Mizoguchi. Ch5ky6 Vagi. 

" Hidematsu Takahashi. f Shugo Hosoi. 

1881 Masata Rinoyie. Yoshizumi Tawara. 
'' Kageaki Magaribuchi. Shin Machida.' 

Jirq Fujikawa. Hirotake Saito. 

tShuzo Matsuo. Hirotada Dmaye. 

Yoshinori Katayama. 

1882 tMasahideShibayama Gyoko Akoo. 

** Hidetaro Yaki. ' Masunosuke Hirayama, 

** Shiba Nakanishi. 

1883 Chusuke Kurata. 






JUN-IGAKUSHI. 

1876 tlwass Asakawa. fGenkai Kobayashi. 

** fYoshinori Tachibana. f Sadakitsu Yagishita. 
*♦ +Ka Gkochi. fTosaku Akashika. 



Teikoka Daigaku. 
IGAKUSHI. 

1886 Sokei Tsutsumi. Kiuyo Date. 

<* Seiichiro Ninomiya. Ainosuke Suzuki. 

t Dead. 



I 



LIST OP GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADaATBS. 



279 



Year of 
Graduation. 




1886 Masat5 Kusunoki. . 


Sannosuke Ogawa. 


<< 


Jyu IW. 


Takeo Kimura. 


<c 


TakuzO Yanagi. 


Haruka Saitd. 


y 


f Manpei Uchida. 


Tsunehisa Satd. 




Hidema Katsura. 


Hidejird Tsutsui. 


(( 


f Hisayasu Mita. 


fMichizumi Hanabusa. 


(( 


f Taketsugu Shimada. 


TeizO Takabata. 


f( 


Renpei Mizuno. 


Tan Takeda. 


f( 


Tameji Tsunemochi. 


Tokkan Miwa. 


l( 


Kunitaro Okada. 


Nagahide Kashiwabara. 


1887 


' fYoshito Inoko. 


Sataro Hirose. 


<< 


Genshi Seo. 


tHiroyasu Ota. 


fl 


Uhito Takayasu. 


Shohei Takayama. 


(( 


fKunisaburd Narabayashi. Kaizd Arimatsu. 


(f 


Tsunekatsu Kurimoto. 


Naganori Majima. 


l( 


Yasuzo Ikehara. , 


Shuny5 Torii. 


« 


Manao Hori. 


Joun Kitamura. 


(( 


Kan Yamazaki. 


Hdsaku Inouye. 


f< 


Kenji Yamada. 


YentarO Muya. 


(< 


Yoshio Yashiro. 


Yasuzd Makita. 


(< 


Shunichi Shimamura. 


Seiken Takenaka. 


u 


Ren Hori. 


Kenkichi Makiyama. 


it 


Tdsaburd Ikebe. 


Kenzaburd Adachi. 


l( 


BunjirO Toki. 


NaojirO Yamamura. 


«« 


Kiujiro Kanki. 


Teiji Fuse. 


1888 Kinnosuke Miura. 


YeijirO Haga. 


(( 


Gakutard Osawa. 


Shizuo Yema. 


(C 


Taiz6 Kono. 


Yoshitaka Onishi. 


f< 


Kwaitard Sakata. 


ToshijirO Chiba. 


t Dead. 


1 ' *■ f 



28o 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Sansei Matsumura. 

Koichi Shishido. 

Doseki Uyama. 

Koichi Shibata. 

Kokichi Takahashi. 

Riutoku Koyama. 

Jun Hatano. 

Riutaro Ikoma. 

Taisuke Kawase. 

Goro Nishiyama. 

f Sonosuke Shishido. 
i88g Seiyu Hirai. 

tTeiichiro Tada. 

Kyoichiro Kajita. 

Buntaro Suzuki. 

Midori Ito. 

Zenjiro Inouye. 

Tatsukichi Irisawa. 

Gakusaburo Tada, 

Tosaburo Yendo. 

Takehiko Goto. 

Komazo Yoshimatsu. 

Toyosaku Murata. 

Keisuke Tanaka. 

Michio Fujiwara. 

ChonosukeKasai. 

Kyui Kuwabara. 
Seiyo Hanaoka 

Bunji Watanabe. 



Seitg Nose. 
Kosanda Cnishi. 
Matajird Hikita. 
Seiji Kubo. 
Tokuzo Horiuchi. 
Iwajiro Yamada. 
Ketsu Aoyama. 
Kumoji Sasaki 
Tomomichi Muri. 
Ryotaku Koike. 

Katsusaaburo Yamagiwa. 
Yanamatsu Okamoto. 
Gitoku Tashiro. 
Kenzo Watanabe. 
Kamejiro Ishii. 
jMatakichi Masaki. 
Mitsuoki Kasahara. 
Miozo Sasagawa. 
Toru Imai. 
Ryosaku Fujiye. 
Tsutomu Inouye. ' 
Tsunejiro Kondo. 
Kingo Shiono. 
Shuhei Shibuya. 
Kitae Onishi. 
Toku Sumikawa. 
Seiji Yasuo. 
Gikatsu Noda. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



28 1 



«< 



<( 



<( 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1889 Morio Fukushima. 
Saneaki Kamizaka. 
Tei Inoo. 
Tsuneo Hoashi. 

1890 Hayazd ltd. 
WaichirO Okada. 
Kisaburo Wakasugi. 
Yaoju Tsutsui. 
Nagao Taniguchi. 
Bunryo Marumo. 
Ydsai Shimodaira 
Fujihiko Sekiba. 
Manji Miyashima. 
Shinzo Otaka. 
Yeinosuke Funaoka. 
Asagoro Abe. 



(( 
(I 

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Hiroo Kawana. 
Motoyoshi Hirahara. 
Rinjiro Imai. 

Hayami Tsuboi. 
Kowan Takata. 
Ikutaro Hirai. 
Teijiro Tsuruda. 
Fumio Suzuki. 
Michiyoshi Mishima. 
tGentaro Yoshimura. 
Seinen Toda. 
Kenryo Kamimura. 
tKyozo Watanabe. 
Seizo Kitamura. 
Shunji Watsuji. 



KichisaburO Takashima. Yorei Hayashi. 



Bunkuro Henmi. 
Shuho Omura. 
Momojiro Nakamura. 
Hidejiro Kurimoto. 
ShinYamamoto. 
Tsuchizo Inouye. 
Hidezo Yoshinaga. 
Yogen Higuchi. 
Teisaku Tamura. 
1891 Tomomasa Masuda. 
Shiuzo Kure. 
Tsugishige Kondo. 



Keiji Azuma. 
Kin Mizuno. 
Kikusaburo Shiraye. 
tSukenao Sawabe. 
Setsuzo Kondo. 
Rin GyOtoku. 
Hidetaka Yamaguchi. 
Tai Watanabe. 
Ban Hirose. 
Tokuo Suzuki. 
Masao Yamagata. 
Shinko Akanuma. 



t Dead. 



282 LIST OF GAKUSHI 


AND OTHER GRADUATES. 


Year of 




Graduation 




i8gi Kinichiro Takahashi. 


Keinosuke Miyairi. 


*' Buntai Kobayashi. 


Shinkichi Imai. 


** Takeji Okamoto. 


KeizdDoi. 


" Tsuutai Inouye, 


Chiu Okabe. 


** Tokuju Nagai. 


tShinkichi Takahashi. 


** Kinya Sato* 


KeitarO Kamon. 


** tMotome Tsurumi. 


Teita Morita. 


" Hisashi Takata. 


Shinshiro Nakazawa. 


" Kiyoshi T6da. 


Riozo Tsuchiya. 


** Kenichird Adachi. 


Seijird Hiraga. 


*' Nagamichi Shibata. 


Raifu Ota. 


** Shintaro Okuni. 


Shiuyei Iba. 


** BungorO Osato. 


Sannosuke Sakurai. 


** Orio Terada. 


Katsunobu Ogawa. 


** Yaichiro Chiba. 


Komatard Hiramatsu* 


** Issen Takemura. 


TokujirO Mori. 


*' Ki Matsushima. 




1892 Hayashi Miyake. 


Ichijir5 Kokawa. 


** TsunejirO Hondo. 


Nayetaro Tanaka. 


** Rai Watanabe. 


Keijiro AndO. 


** Sadaye Nakahara. 


Yojiu Kond6. 


«* Tadahiro Noda. 


Junichi Umehara. 


** Kametaro Nakanishi. 


Kugataro Omura. 


" Toji Gako. 


Mitsuaki Tamura. 


'* Shionosuke Nagamatsu. Genkei Momose. 


** TetsutarQ Izumi. 


Genshin Kambayashi. 


•* Yeinosuke Kuribara. 


Hisashi Tsuge. 


** Keirio Katakura. 


Sukehiko Ito. 


** Jiuzen Nakagawa. 


Yanoji Kumasaka. 


** Tokiyuki Tsuda. 


Shinzo Asahina. 


*• Hiroshi Tada. 


YeizaburO Sasakura. 



'LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



283 



I 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1892 Nobutomo Suzuki. 
'* Ushihachi Sase. 

1893 Ushitard Matsuura. 
Kichi Totsuka. 
SakuzO Koike. 
Mochishige Hashida. 
Shiku Miyamoto. 
Toranoshin Toyoda. 
Inks Nishiyama. 
Jun Misumi. 
Akira Shimasaki. 
Akira Hayashi. 
Shiuji Kumano. 
Masaji Kawamura. 

** Saisuke Nakagawa. 

1894 Kurata Morishima. 
Kiyoshi Kawai 
Kameichird Kashida. 
Yasutard Yedakuni. 
Hirokichi Nishi. 
Kenji Kasei. 
Torakichi Yonegawa. 
Miyagoro Takai. 
Tomoaki Matsuo. 
Chikakuni Moriya. 

1895 Taichi Kitashima. 
Yomoshi Sasaki. 
Shiuichi Aoki. 
Tatsujird Kanamori. 
Seichiu Kinoshita. 
Shintard Miwa. 



f Minatard Akinaga. 

Morihiko Nakayama. 
TetsuzO Yamada. 
Aizo ltd. 
Kotaro Yokota, 
RiujirO Akimoto. 
Ren Sugimura. 
Yetsuzo Iwasaki. 
TsunetarO Murayama. 
Sei Sugita. 
Shozo Sawabe. 
Shiutoku Tanaka. 
Keinosuke Majima. 
Shigetaka Matsumoto. 
Shunji Shishido. 
Iwataro Kihara. 
Motonosuke Goto. 
Katsutake Azuma. 
Buntaro Adachi. 
Motoharu Ito. 
Sajiro Fukuoka. 
Tatsusai Omura. 
Shotaro Miyoshi. 
Teijir5 Takemura. 
Kidji Kiribuchi. 
Chiyonosuke Yokote. 
Hiroo Yamaguchi. 
Yoshio Sugitachi. 
Takao Kitabatake. 
Keiji Kosaka. 



L 



284 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES, 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1895 SakitarO Asaba. 
* Kametaro Kobayashi. 

<* Toraji Shiokawa. 
Yasumasa Kaji. 
Hisashi Ishivvara. 
Yushiro Hara. 

1896 Akira Fujinami. 
Chiutaro Tomita. 
Keiji Kawashima. 
Junzo Nagano. 
Shintaro Uchida. 
Teiseki Takahashi. 
Yorishige Toraiwa. 
Seizo Ichinobe. 
Toyojj Suzuki. 
Tamejiro Oshima. 
Giotoku Nakaizumi. 



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Teizo Nagai. 

Samuro Hashimoto. 

Kinetaro SaitO. 

Tamio Tanaka. 

Han Nagao. 

Chuyei Okada. 

Sessai Hashimoto. 

Kentaro Shimose. 

Hitoshi Maki* 

Teikichi Ishikawa. 

Jirosaburo Sasaki. 

Rentaro Miura. 

Sakujiro Mizuno. 

Keitaro Watanabe. 

Yasukichi Arai. 

Tatsuhiko Okamura. 

Jiichiro Nishimaki. 
Shigekatsu Sakamoto. Rintaro Kimura. 
Junji Awaka. Masanobu Masuyama. 



YAKUGAKUSHI. 
PHARMACY. 

1890 Chonosuke Murayama. Ginjiro Aikawa. 
Tsunejiro Furuya. Keizo Ikeguchi. 
Matsuji Hirayama. 

1891 KintarO Uyeno. 

1892 Tatsusei Wake. Takasato Kojima. 

1893 Hisagoro Ono. 



<( 



(( 



LIST OP GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



285 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1894 Hajime Ctsuki. 

1895 KdtarO Sakai. 

1896 Kotaro Nishizaki. 



Graduate, who passed the graduation examinations in 
October, 1896, but have not yet received formally 
his graduation diploma : 

Toyoyuki Yeda. 





Kdbu-Dai-GakkO- 




KOGAKUSHI. 




CIVIL ENGINEERING. 


1879 


Kiyoshi Minami. 


Ayahiko Ishibashi. 


1880 Hachiro Kobayashi. 


Yokichi Tsujimura. 


<i 


Rokuro Ota. 


Motoi Chikusa. 


<< 


Ky5ta Shibuya. 


Seitaro lizuka. 


CI 


Atsutaka Sayeki. 




I88I 


Narinori Sato. 


tTaki Katori. 


<l 


Yoshiwo Asuke. 


Moritaka Yemori. 


<< 


Tsuto Yashiro- 


Yukitaro Takata. 


1882 


tSenzo Oshima. 


Hisaki Nobechi. 


(< 


Aijiro Kasai. 


Heinojid Uyeki. 


(( 


Sanjiro Kikkawa. 




1883 


Kaichi Watanabe. 


Sakuro Tanabe. 


it 


Takanobu Kono. 


Shokichi Miyagishima. 


<f 


Masayuki Otagawa. 


Junnosuke Yamaguchi. 


<l 


tjdsaburo Kono. 


tMotoi Uyeyama. 



t Dead. 



286 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHBR GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1883 Yasukichi Shimizu. 

1884 Taminosuke Kume. 
** Hanjiro Furukawa. 

1885 Chosaku Yoshimura. 
N.aka Tomonari. 
Seiichiro Fukuoka. 



it 



Kd Funabiki. 
Kamesaburo Yoshimoto. 
Togo Ogawa. 
Tokimasa Aisawa. 
Jitsu Makino. 



(( 





MECHANICAL 


ENGINEERING. 


1879 tNaotada Takayama. 


Shinrokuro Miyoshi. 


(( 


Shinichiro Arakawa. 


Seinoshin Imada. 


u 


Koji Miyasaki. 


, 


1880 


Yoshiaki Yasunaga. 


Torazo Harada. 


(( 


Tanoshi Saka. 


Jiro Sadachi. 


li 


Sekitar6 Takeda. 


Yoshisada Nogami. 


it 


Shigemichi Fujita. 


Saneyasu Oka. 


(i 


Kuro Yoshimi. 


+Kiben Soda. 


• 

(1 


Yasushi lyeiri. 


' 


I88I 


T6ichir5 Usui. 


Shinichi Hattori. 


(t 


Bunji Mano. 


Tai Kishi. 


n 


Toshinobu Suda. 


Masatomo Naito. 


i( 


Shimzaburo Awaya. 


Masa Koyasu. 


it 


Rintaro Tanaka. 


• 


1882 


Ariya Inokuchi. 


Junzo Nakahara. 


<< 


Seizaburo Kawai. 


Tsunezo Saito. 


(< 


guetaro Kosaka. 


Mataro Kurizuka. 


1883 


tHikotaro Mizukami. 


tSenpei Inagaki. 


<( 


Hikomatsu Iwasaki. 


Taki Odake. 


(( 


Motoki Kendo. 





t Dead. 



LIST OP GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



287 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1885 Tsuneta Shin. 
Seikichird Hata. 



KyOzo Kikuchi, 



(( 



NAVAL ARCHltECTURE. 

1883 tSuyemichl Kameda. Yoshiaki Iwata. 
** Kichiro Koyama. 

1884 Umanosuke Fukuda. Yasuichi Sugitani. 
" Ky6 Aoki. 

1885 Tsurutaro Matsuo. Shinsaburo Konishi. 



1879 
1880 

i88i 

i( 

It 

1882 
li 

ti 

1883 

(( 
1884 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

tRinsaburo Shida. 



Takeo Iwata. 
Ichisuke Fujioka. 
Hatsune Nakano. 
fKakunosuke lida. 
Saitaro Oi. 
Kotaro Morishima. 
Makoto Tsuboi. 
fUmesaburo Kotaka. 
f Rentaro Nagayama. 
Senkichi Kanda. 
Daisaburd Aoki. 



Shinjun Nakayama. 
Kosaku Kumakura. 
Osuke Asano. 
Takamasa Kashiwamura. 
Gitar6 Yamakawa. 
Hidesuke Igarashi. 
Kunihiko Iwataru. 
Bentaro Tamaki. 
Tei Hasegawa. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

1879 Jokichi Takamine. Seikichi Mori. 

** tTeikichi Nakamura. Yoshiki Fukabori. 



fDead. 



288 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1879 Shinjiro Kishi. 

1880 Shotaro Tsukiyama. 
" Sei Ninomiya. 

1881 Michitada Kawakita. 
" Tamemasa Haga. 

1882 Tatsuo Inui. 

1883 tTetsukichi Shimizu. 

1884 Masanobu Shimose. 
•* Iwaichiro Shizuki. 

1885 Kichijiro Ihara. 



Zenichi Imai. 
Yeinosuke Tanabe. 
Chutaro Matsudaira. 



Tsunehisa Fujii. 
Torataro Kawanami. 
Toshishige Hosokawa. 
Saburo Ogata. 



ARCHITECTURE. 



1879 
(< 

1880 

1881 
(( 

1882 

1883 

1885 



Kingo Tatsuno. 
Tatsuzo Sone. 
tHisakichi Fujimoto. 
fMatatsune Sakamoto. 
Masutomo Ohara. 
Takamasa Niinomi. 
Tatsutaro Nakamura. 
Kinsai Funakoshi. 
Hanichi Morikawa. 
GorO Watanabe, 



Tokuma Katayama. 
Shichijiro Sadachi. 
Yuzuru Watanabe. 
Masamichi Kuru. 

Kikusuke Torii. 

Daikichi Taki. 
Shigenori Yoshii. 



MINING. 



1879 fKizo Kondo. 

1880 Tatsuo Oki. 



Masakane Asd. 
Sei Kuwabara. 



fDead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



289 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1880 Masamichi Yoshiwara. 
** Chikanari Matsushita. 

Tominori Kitsunezaki. 

Rikusaburo Kondd. 
i88t Itsuzo Fujino. 

Teiz6 Sera. 

RaijirO Hayashi. 

KiutarO Nagai. 

1882 tKakichi Miyazaki. 
** Osamu Ishida. 
** Morikazu Mita. 
** Tetsusaburo Kosugi. 

1883 Soichi Yamagata. 
** Rokunosuke Suzuki. 

1884 Junnosuke Ohara. 
** Seiichi Saito. 
** IgajirO Mamiya. 
** Itaro Hidaka. 
** Shiro Yamaguchi. 

1885 Yasushiro Kawai. 
Takeji Nakamura. 
Nagaaki Akiyama. 



<( 



C( 



(( 



M 



<< 



<i 



li 



tHatashi Ogashima. 
Ryo Sengoku. 
Kinichi Yamada. 
Sukenobu Maki. 
Shigeru Sugata. 
Toyonoshin Tsuno* 
Masanobu Ishibashi. 
Toru Sato. 
Naka Matoba. 
Reiji Kanda. 
Rokuro Oshima. 
Kumajiro Sunohara. 
Sakujiro Fujioka. 
Yeiichi Matsuda. 
Ichiro Otsubo. 
Kenroku Shimada. 
Masayoshi Abe. 
Washitaro Kasahara. 

Masateru Kuroda. 
Kinichiro Ishizaka. 



METALLURGY. 

1879 Fuyukichi Obana. fRen Kurimoto. 

1880 Yonehachi Takashima. 

1881 Shichiro Nobe. 

1882 Kanji Kitamura. 



t Dead., 



290 LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 

GRADUATES. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Year of 

Graduation. 



1879 *Shukichi Sugiyama. 

1880 tYoshisada Terauchi. 

1881 *Ichitaro Yamanouchi. 

1882 Ryiizaburo Ito. Isaburo Kambara. 

1883 tKintaro I^atsuma. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 



1879 Yoshio Torii. 

1880 t*Kyushiro Hayashi. 

1882 *Takuju Obata. 

1883 Masatada Ikeda. 



ARCHITECTURE. 

1882 tishimatsu Miyahara. Kozo Kawai. 

1883 *Tomotar5 Yoshizawa. 



MINING. 



i88q Minoji Arakawa, 
i88i tHoken Cho. 



•Third Class Graduates. jDead, 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. . 



29lI 



Teikoka Daigaka. 



KOGAKUSHI. 
CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
(Students of the late Kobu-daigakko.) 



Year of 
•Graduation. 

1886 Seitaro Mukasa. 
" Koran Sugawara. 
" Tomonao Oyama. 
** Toshiro Uyeda. 
■** Kinnosuke Torikoye. 



Isshi Saburi. 
Umesaburo Ogawa. 
Tomoyoshi Kuno. 
Toyataro Kuroda. 



(Students of the late Kogeigakubu.) 
1886 Hakujiro Kobayashi. Tajima Tanimura. 



•887 Toragoro Kondo. 

Tsunejiro Nambu. 

Hidejiro Watanabe. 

tMasaye Hayashi. 
2888 HidesaburoNakayama. 

Kyoichi Murakami. 

Ken Kudo. 

Fusayoshi Nozawa. 

Matsutaro Mochigase. 

Inazo Toya. 

Issei Oki. 



u 



Al 



.< 



u 



4( 



4C 



44 



4< 



Nobushiro Watanabe. 
Toyojur5 Nagasaki. 
Shuntaro Yamaguchi. 
Tokujiro Inouye. 
Kumema Okura. 
Shigenaga Yoshiwara. 
Tadashi Okubo, 
Kinzaburo Kishi. 
Kozaburo Tanii. 
Masao Yamagami. 



« 



t Dead. 



agZ * LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1889 tHiroshiro Hirokawa. Torataro Nishio. 



<c 



Sukihiko Niwa. 
Yoshiki Okazaki. 
Shunpei Yegawa. 
Kisei Soda. 

1890 tShoichiro Kimura. 

KyojirO Ichinose. 

Kokuji Takikawa. 

Ishiyo Ishikawa. 

Teinosuke Aoyama. 

SeijirO Ishiguro. 

Sadaichiro Miike. 

1 89 1 Tojiro Sano. 
Tatsujiro Takahashi. 
Tadamasa Sekiya. 
Hanpei Nagao. 

1892 Shikajiro Hattori. 
Sei Kojo. 
Sannosuke Hori. 
Rokuji Noda. 

1893 Mitsuo Nawa. 
Tokichi Yendo, 



(( 



(( 



n 



ti 



<( 



n 



^^ 



n 



n 



^^ 



<i 



(( 



(( 



II 



^t 



n 



^^ 



tt 



it 



Motojiro linuma. 
Shinbei Kunizawa. 
Rokuro Watanabe. 

TakegorS Okada. 
Jiro Miyake. 
Molokichiro TakahashL 
IwatarS Okuyama. 
Shigeyoshi Ishimaru. 
Narishige Tadano. 
Kusujiro Nii* 
Shigekuro Kadono. 
Tamon Tsuruda. 
Kikuzo Ikawa. 

Kusuke Mioi. 
Mitsutaro Ando. 
Fujimaru Yasuda. 

Koichi Hida. 
Yumizo Sugamura. 



Tatsunosuke Tsukawa. Jin Inagaki. 
Sennosuke Sekoda. Mokichi Sugino. 



Renjiro Nakanishi. 
Harujiro Hida. 
Kuriitaro Takahashi. 
1894 Takahiko Ofuji. 

Yasuich:ro Tomita. 
Riosaburo Aoki. 
Takijiro Iwakuchi. 



n 



<( 



(( 



<( 



(( 



Yoshito Sakaushi. 
Unokichi Hashimoto.. 
Kuro Sakata. 
Sozaburo Sugiura. 
Shukichi Tashiro. 
Taketaro Furukawa. 
Takejiro Shima. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



?93 



Year of 
<3ndoatioQ. 



tt 



€t 



€t 



1894 Kumazo Fujii. 
Sunao Mikami. 
Kanesaburo Nagura. 
TatsujirO Adachi. 

April 1895 Yasuzo Kodaira. 

1895 Tadashi Nagasawa. 
Seiki Ohikata. 
Rinnosuke Asahina. 
Yasunosuke Someya. 
Torao Kawaguchi. 
Yeitaro Watanabe. 
Gunjuro Mochida. 

I>ecember 1895 Toratar6 Nishimura 



Kokichi Nanzai. 
Usaku Sasao. 
Yonokichi Kato. 



«< 



« 



« 



«c 



n 



<4 



Tetsuz6 Kurashige. 
Masao Tanaka. 
Chikatami Soyama. 
Gor5 Shionoya. 
Yusuke Tamamura. 
Kanosuke Niimoto. 



' 



r 



1896 Keisaku Shibata. 
Rokuzo Kume. 
Kyoichi Aki. 
Shotaro Omura. 
Kiyoshi Miyagawa. 
ChotarO Sato. 
Naritoshi Shibata. 
K6z6 Sugitani. 
Heitaro Inagak. 
Narimasa Akutsu. 
Kanichiro Kimura. 



4< 



4t 



*i 



t* 



44 



44 



44 



44 



■44 



Ai 



Minoru Umeno, 
Tsuneo Tokumi. 
Taizo Kobayashi. 
Isamu Aoki. 
Kichizo Nakagawa. 
Isamu Kato. 
Shiro Sato. 
Chiushird Odagiri. 
Heizaburo Okazaki. 
Seigi Hashizume. 
Yashiro Hamano. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
(Students of the late Kobu-Daigakk6) 

1886 Teikan Atsumi. Kanichi Utsuriomiya. 



294 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



(Students of the late Kogeigakubu.) 



i885 Hidehisa Shimoyama. Matsujiro Ohira. 
Riu Saburi. Chiyokichi Suzukis 



(( 



1887 

1888 
1889 
1890 



it 



1891 



a 



1892 

1893 
1894 



n 



n 



tt 



1895 



<i 
n 
ti 

n 



Ritaro HIrota. 
Shozo Tomonaga. 
Narazo Takatsuji. 
Takashi Matsubara. 
Takeo Takimura. 
Fujita Tanaka. 
Hikozo Mori. 
Tsunataro Sakuma. 
Kaname Otsuka. 
Tsuruzo Matsumura. 
Chusaburo Shiba. 
tKenzu Hikobe. 
Kunihiko Kawakami. 
Kumao Fuwa. 
Shogo Hasegawa. 



Suketard Takai. 
Tadayoshi. Okubo., 
Ikuyata Suzuki. 

Gontaro Shiba. 



Yasujira Shi ma. 
Noboru Kaneko. 
Seiichi Tabuchi. 

Ichiro Yezaki. 
Aizaburo Matono. 



Tokumatsu Fujibayashi. Toyokichi Kawada^ 



1896 



n 
n 
n 
ti 
ti 



Sojiro Suzuki 
Toichiro Yuasa. 
Matashird Yoshino. 
Kiichiro^Y4»o. 
Tsunetaro Shinoda. 
Sagakichi Toriyama. 
Senkatsu Matsuno. 
Kunisuke Sekifuji.' 
K5ichi Hibi. 



Tsunema Kuroda. 

Tatsumi Mochida. 
Tsuneo Gushima. 
Tokuro Uchida. 
Jitsur5 Yokoi. 
Yeisaku Sekimoto. 
Gor5 Furuta. 



i i 



1 > 



-: > 



•> i 



1 > 



» t 



i > 



) * 



.k 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 295 

NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 
(Student of the late Kobu-Daigakko.) 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1886 Taito Tanaka. 



1887 Bunichiro Fukuchi. K6 Watanabe. 
" Takahisa Shirato. Tatsukichi Ito. 

1888 SakutarO Takakura. Tomiichi Uyeno. 

1889 Kumekichi Toyama. 

1890 Seiichi Terano. Raikichi Shirai. 

" Saku Yamada. Yasuz5 Wadagaki, 

1 89 1 Tsune Mera. 

1892 Tomomichi Katd. 

1893 Monya Kojima. Kaizo Yamamoto. 
*• Masaya Ambe. 

1894 Hanpei Fujishima. 

1895 Kazufusa Tamagawa. Ayaji Ishikawa. 
" Kinetaro Takeda. 

1896 Kentaro Tanisuye. Denjiro Tsuruda. 



TECHNOLOGY OF ARMS. 



1890 Shozo Arisaka. 
1892 Shidsaku Hinata. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

(Student of the late K6bu-Daigakk6.) 
1886 Seisuke Hayashi. 



296 



LIST OF GAKUSHE AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 

Graduation. 

1887 Masamichi Niwa. 

1888 Junsuke Miyake. 

1889 f Sekitard Nakagawa. 
** Toraichiro Ikeda. 

1890 Juki Kobori. 

1 891 Dengoro Ushipda. 

1892 Iwasaburd Nakahara. 
** Jiuzo Kajiura. 

1893 Kichijiro Itami. 

** Keitaro Okamoto. 

1894 Keijiro Okamoto. 

1895 Komakichi Kimura. 
** Kogoro Watanabe. 

1896 Hicfetaro Ho. 
Chuji Awoyama. 
Seiichi Hirota. 
Ichiro Goto. 
Denji Yoshino. 
Mannosuke Niwa. 
Tsunesada Fujita. 
Riojiro Matsuura. 

May 1896 Kumajiro Amano. 



Hayatsuchi Kodama. 
Toraji Bannai. 
Torajiro Koki. 

KOhei Oiwa. 

Yotaro Wadachi. 
Senjiro Koyake. 
Takasuke Okamoto. 
Samuro Tani. 
Masujiro Yenya. 
Keijiro Kishi. 
Shdsuke Mine. 
Yasuo Riko. 
Jun Noguchi. 
Tadanori Tomita. 
BunrokurO Sugino. 
Kinichiro Katayama. 
Seiji Ichikawa. 
Kazuo Morita. 
Shogoro Tsukino. 



ARCHITECTURE. 
(Student of the late Kobu-Daigakko.) 

1886 Toyosuke Tanaka. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES 



297 



<( 



<( 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Nishijird Nakahama. 

1890 Tamisuke Yokokawa. 
** Hy6z5 S5. 

1891 Keikichi Ishii. 

1892 Chuda It6. 
Seiz6 Taj i ma. 
Ikuji Kawai. 

1893 Uheiji Nagano. 
** Kisabnrd Okura. 

1894 Magoichi Noguchi^ 
** Kenkichi Yahashi. 

1895 Tadashi Sekino. 

1896 Teiji Suzuki. 
" Tsunejir5 Fukuoka. 
" Kentar6 Ikeda. 



Manji Kasai. 

Teikichi Shimizu. 
Yeifu Mamizu. 
Keijir6 Yamashita. 

Yasushi Tsukamoto. 
Shiro Mitsuhashi. 
Sannosuke Osawa. 
Oto Yendo. 
Ichiro Nomura. 
Yoshinosuke Horiike. 
Heizo Hashimoto. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

(Students of the late Kobu-Daigakko.) 
1886 Chikamasa Okubo. Toshio Ichikawa. 



(Student of the late Kogeigakubu.) 



1886 Kinichiro Ichino. 



1887 Sukesaburo Doi. 

1888 Matsunosuke Hosoki. 

Sentaro Tsuboi. 

tKaichiro Suto. 



C{ 



(( 



Masuo Moriyama. 
Gorokichi Nakagawa. 
Gisuke Ikuta. 
Yoma Yamadera. 



298 



LIST OF GAKUSHl AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



t< 



(i 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Takeo Watanabe. 
Hy6tar6 Umeno. 
lYoshihiko Okajima. 

1889 tMinejiro Tonami. 
** Ky6tar5 Kitamura. 

1890 Yeikichir6 Motono. 

189 1 Yoshigor6 Shinoda. 

1892 Kuaijiro Kendo. 

1893 Torakichi Nishikawa. 

1894 Jokichiro Yemori. 
Wataru Amenomiya. 

Shigematsu Yamaoka. Tdtaro Fujibayashi. 

Motokichi Ikeo. Tomitaro Yamao. 

1895 Kamejiro Toshikawa. Yatsutaro Sayeki. 
Suyekichi Hiramatsu. Tokuju Kaneko. 



<( 



(( 



(( 



it 



Kenji SaitO. 
Yoshigoro. Wakayama. 

Santei Utsumi. 
Kanetomi Yoshimura. 

Shinzo Yendo. 

Toragoro Tanahashi. 
Takeshi Kamoi. 
Otokichi Yamanouchi. 



<< 



Tsunesuke Shiota. 
October 1895 Shiro Nakai. 
1896 Sosuke Nakagawa. 

Kiutaro Miyoshi.' 

Chikaya Oyama. 

Maroshi Iwanura. 

Utard Yamazaki. 



II 



li 



t( 



Yeijiro Tanaka. 

FusajirO Kodera. 
Zinkichi Inouye. 
Seigo Shimizu. 
Osamu Imaida. 



(( 



MINING. 



(Students of the late K5bu-Daigakk5) 
1886 Seizoku Yonekura. Ichisuke Ohigata. 



fDead. 



UST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



299 



TECHNOLOGY OF EXPLOSIVES. 



Year of 
Gradaation. 



1891 Kumaji Kususe. 



MINING AND METALLURGY. 
(Student of the late- Kogeigakubu.) 

1886 Buntard Yamada. 



1887 Hachiya Ishida. 

1888 Miyagoro Onda. 
** Giichi Akiyama. 

1889 Scigo Nishiyama. 

1891 Gunpei Monma. 

1892 Koroku Kamura. 
** SuyenojS Meguro. 
** Yoshikatsu Yamasruchi. 



Yoshitaro Watanabe. 
Teizabur6 Hori. 
Seitaro Uchida. 



(( 



ti 



1893 Kiosaku Takeda. 
'* Yasuhei Yoneda. 

1894 Aitaro Nomi. 
Junsuke lijima. 
Yoshiteru Yoneyama. 

1895 Tamaki Makita. 
Yoshima Sayeki. 
Kajita Nishi. ' 
Sutezo Yeto. 
Kiichiro Takagi. 

1896 Kunihiko Yamada. 
** Ritsuzo Tsumagi. 
** Jujiro Ishiura. 

*• Takumi Seno, 



(( • 



i( 



(< 



it 



r 

Kiutaro Kuroiwa. 
Kaichiro Imaizumi. 
Zen Hattori. 

I way a Hosoi. 
Masashige lioka. 
Jisaburo Yokobori. 
Kinjiro Shimamura. 

Kinosuke Fukutome. 
Kiiraji Kuzu. 
Tasuku Uchiyama." 
Tetsu Shiibara. 
Seiroku Tsubouchi. 
Yoshio Ihara. 
Koji Tamaki. 
Juro Munakata. 
Sh5kichi Nomura. 



L 



300 LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 

Yaer of 
Graduation. 

1896 PenjirO Nakanishi. Seizaburo Takakura. 

" Hatsushiro Ohashi. Juntaro Sugimot6. 



Tokyo Daigaka- 



BUNGAKUSHL 

PHILOSOPHY, POLITICAL SCIENCE, POLI- 

TICAL ECONOMY, AND JAPANESE 

AND CHINESE LITERATURE. 

1880 Kenzo Wadagaki. c.a. Tetsujiro Inouye. a.b. 
*' Shinsaku Kodera. a,b, Kiyoomi Chikami a,b, 
*^ Sadanaga Koba.. b.c. Keizo Nakakuma. b,c. 

** Kakuz6 Okakura. b.c, fTakasuye. Fukutomi. a.c. 

1881 f Seiiehi Suyeoka. c,a. Kumazo Tsuboi. b.c. 
Keiroku Tsutsuki. b.c. Kojiro Tatsumi. a.b. 
Jigoro Kano. b.c. Inagi Tanaka. d. 

1882 Nagao Ariga. a. Sanaye Takata. b.c. 

** Ichiro Yamada. b.c^ Tameyuki Amano. b.c. 

1883 Yujiro Miyake. a. Seitaro Umewaka. b.c. 

" Yatsuka Hozumi. b.c^ fChonosuke Ogiwara. bu:. 
** Takejiro Kimura. b.c. Sadakichi Tsuruhara., b.c» 
" Yuzp Tsubouchi. b.c. Kamejiro Mayekawa. b.c, 
" Tadatake Ogawa. b.c. Teishichi Nakahara, b.c. 

1884 Yoshiro Sakatani. b.c. Tsunejiro Nakagawa. b.c. 

a. Graduates of Philosophy. 

b, ** •' Political Science. 

c, •* " Political Economy. 

d. " ** Japanese and Chinese Literature. 

t Dead. - 






> 






LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 30I 

Year of 

Graduation. 

1884 Kinya Kume. bx. Kenjird Hamada. b.c. 

** Shikuro Hiranuma.&.c. Kinshiro Tsuchiko. b.c. 
** Ju-ichi Soyeda. b.c. Yuji Rinoiye. b.c. 
" Shoren Kato. b.c. Hidero Kasuga. b.c. 

" Gompei Harakawa.&.c. Suketo Sugiye. b.c. 
" Ichiro Tanahashi. d. 

1885 YenryO Inouye. a. Yen Kanai. b.c. 

" Kojuro Nagasaki, b.c. Unto Kurokawa. b.c. 
** Tsunekuni Mihara.6.c. jRokuro Honma. b.c. 



Teikoku Daigaku 



BUNGAKUSHI. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

1886 fMasane Hidaka. Ichizo Nagasawa. 
** tGinnosuke Sakakura. 

1887 Mitsuyuki Kiyosawa. Ryohei Okada. 
•* Junzaburo Yamane. 

1888 Masataro Sawayanagi. 

1889 Shuku Onishi. Jintaro Ose. 
** Tonosuke Watanabe. 

i8go Unokichi Hattori. 

1891 Yasuji Otsuka. Kokichi Kano. 

** Goichiro Makise. Nobumasa Fujii. 

1892 Sensaburo Tachibana. Sokei Sonoda. 

fDead. 



302 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1893 Bunzaburo Matsumoto. Matataro Matsumoto. 
Yasusaburo Yoneyama. Matajird Watanabe. 
Yenjiro Matsudaira. 

1894 Yoshinaga Oshima. 
Te.i Iwamoto. 
Yoshitatsu Sakamaki. 

1895 Susume Mizobuchi. 



(( 



it 



<( 



(( 



Ju Odani. 
Suyehiko Kusaba. 



" Aikichi Miyoshi. 
•* Nobutada Oda. 
1896 Genyoku Kuwaki. 

Tongo Tatebe. 

Rinjiro Takayama. 

Ichizo Hirota. 



it 



(< 



(( 



(( 



i( 



i( 



(I 



Goro Kumagaya. 
Kikuo Wada. 
Yeinosuke Kuribara. 
Masaharu Anezaki. 
Tomojir6 Shimizu. 
Kojiro Matsumoto. 
Jir5 Shimoda. 



Yasunosuke Yamamoto. Kamejiro Kurita. 
Toshiye Murakami. Juzo Takahashi. 
Tadasaburo Hashimoto. Matataro Nozaki. 
Chihiro Kuroki. 



JAPANESE LITERATURE, 



1886 TsunetarO Toda. 

1888 Kazutoshi Uyeda. 

1889 Sanji Mikami. 

1890 Mankichi Wada. 

1892 Yaichi Haga. 

1893 Hisato Kikuchi. 

1894 Sakutaro Fujioka. 
** Kiyotami Kusano. 

1895 Masao Shioi. 

1896 Moritaro Hayashi. 



Kuwasaburd Takatsu. 



Otoo Fujii. 



Toshisuke Sugi. 



LIST OF -GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



303 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1896 MatajirO Takeshima. 

Yutaka Yoshida. 

Masakazu Sasa. 



^t 



Hikaru Shimomura. 
Yoshiye Omachi. 



u 



CHINESE LITERATURE. 



1894 Masatsura Miyamoto. 
** tShigetaro Nakano. 

1895 Naoki Kano. 

1896 Jitsuzo Kuwabara. 
•• Yutaro Asakawa. 



Toraji Nishitani. 

Toyohachi Fujita. 
Susumu Yamanouchi. 



JAPANESE HISTORY. 



I 

r 



1893 Kenjiro Kikuchi. 
** Tan Shidehara. 

1894 Kingoro Omori. 
•* Nobunao Oda. 

** Rioshin Tatsukuchi. 

1895 Torata Muto. 

** Teinosuke Inouye. 
** Hitoshi Oshige. 

1896 Ginz6 Uchida. 

** Katsumi Kuroita. 
** Oshir5 Ito. 
** Naomasa Nakajo. 
Seisaku Kobayashi. 



{( 



Saijir6 Nakayama. 

Seiichi Fujita. 
Shiro Kamiya. 

Seiichi Okabe. 
Sadama Ohara. 

Teikichi Kita. 
Reishiro Nakano. 
Kenpei Shibasaki. 
Taneo Sasakawa. 
Rujiro Kidera. 



jDead. 



304 



LIST OF GAKUSHI ANE OTHER GRADUATES. 



HISTORY. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1889 tKwanichiro Shimoyama. 

1890 Ryo Isoda. Kurakichi Shiratori. 

1 89 1 Ginjiro Ogawa. 

1892 Koichiro Urai. 

1893 Ag" Saito. Asajir6 Honda. 

** Teiichiro Hasegawa. Sumio Nakazawa. 

1894 Tarokichi Yoshikawa. Shinichiro Fuwa.- 
** Katsuji Yoshimura. Sokichi Matsuda. 



<c 



Motoji Satake. 

1895 Chiharu Watanabe. 
Seitaro Saito. 
Tokihide Nagayama. 
Yuroku Hara. 

1896 Shigetomo Koda. 
Hideo Segawa. 
Sadaaki Kitabatake. 
Tsuneji Inouye. 
Shigeo Kawaguchi. 



(i 



It 



t< 



(( 



«i 



(( 



<{ 



Naojiro Murakami. 
Kiichi Sdgaki. 
Kiyoshi Makiyama. 

Katsuro Hara. 
Tadasu Yui. 
Tsunejiro Kato. 
Komasaku Shibuye. 



COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY. 



1890 Sotokichi Hayashi. 
1893 tSeisei Yokoyama. 

1895 Riozaburo Sakaki. 

1896 Naoyoshi Ogawa. 



Riutaro Kawaguchi. 
Shozaburo Kanazawa. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 305 

ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Year of 

raduaticn. 

189 1 Masaki Tachibana. 
1893 Kinnosuke Natsume. 

1895 Ichiroichi Tamamushi. Shinjiro Yamakawa. 

1896 Bunjiro Shima. Kisaku Tamura. 
** Kunitaro Kuroyanagi. 



GERMAN LITERATURE. 

1891 Teisuke Fujishiro. Torao Suga. 

1895 S^U^ Uyeda. 

1896 Tojiro Nagaye. 



Tokyo DaigakU' 



RIGAKUSHI. 
CHEMISTRY. 

1877 Rokuro Takasu. Mitsuru Kuhara. 
** Michimasa Miyazaki. 

1878 Tokusaburo Isono. Jintaro Takayama. 
** Shinrokuro Ito. Gibi Hiraga. 

** Toyokichi Takamatsu. Shun Fukuda. 
** tKoichi Kobayashi. 

1879 Iwata Nakazawa. Toyota Ishido. 
** MitsLizo Hida. Kenjiro Ota. 

** tYeijiro Watanabe. Yataro Kitamura. 



3o6 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES, 



Year of 

Graduation* 

1880 Yoshimasa Koga. 
Iwao Ishikawa. 
Izuru Watanabe. 
18S1 Osamu Hisada. 
** Tsuneshichiro Kato. 

1882 Toyokitsu Uyeda. 
** Shunsui Sawabe. 

1883 Kanichiro Koide. 
Tozo Bannai. 
Yasukichi Oishi. 
Sagoro Sugilani. 



n 



(( 



n 



it 



<< 



Hikorokuro Yoshida. 
Monoshiro Moriya. 
Osamu Matsumoto. 
Seizo Imai. 
Gentaro Takahashi. 
Yataro Ishikawa. 
tKakusaburo Tachibana. 
Kusushi Iwabuchi. 
tHideloshi Tokoroya. 
Tetsutaro Yoshioka. 
Shintaro Adachi. 



PURE CHEMISTRY. 

1884 Yeinoshin Yoshitake. fKatsujiro Takashima. 

1885 Yetsunojo Hori. Motojiro Matsui. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 



1884 Bunjiro Masujima. 
** Itaru Ando. 

1885 Kumazo Tsuboi. 



Ishitaro Yokochi. 



Mitsukuni Murase. 



PHYSICS. 



1878 Hisashi Terao. 

** fTeiji Nobutani. 



Yoshitaka Sembon. 
Kyohei Nakamura. 



t Dead. 



I 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AKfi OTHER GRADUATES. 307 

Year of 
Ciraduation. 

1878 Fusalci Sakurai. -^ 

1879 Tadasu Namba. Kiyoo Nakamura. 
" Umekichi Yatabe. Yuji Wada. 

** Susumu Samejima. Muneoori Takanose. 
" tSbuye Toyoda. 

1880 Kanicbiro Miwa. Mamori Mimori. 
Tokusaburo Kiriyama. tjiniinatsu Shioda. ' 
Unari Kobayasbi. +Tadamoto Sawano. 

" Teizo Tamana. Tota Yasuda. 

1882 Shobei Tanaka. Rikitaro Fujisawa. 
** Aikitsu Tanakadate. 

1883 Sukeyasu Sakai. 

1884 Yeinosuke Yamaguchi. 

1885 tKiyoshi Sawai. tSbintaro Hayasaki. 






BIOLOGY. 

188 1 Isao lijima. Tomotaro Iwakawa. 

** Cbiujiro Sasaki. 



ZOOLOGY. 



1882 Cbiyomatsu Isbikawa. 
p 1885 Genpachi Mitsukuri. 



BOTANY. 
1885 Kotaro Saida. 

t Dead. 



3o8 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES.. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



Year of 

Graduation. 



1880 Teiichi Sakata. 

1881 Tomokichi Yoshida. 

1883 tSakuji Yokoi. 

" tMitsuo Tanabe. 

1884 Shozaburo Gonda. 



Ryusaku Godai. 
Shintaro Kawakami. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



(( 



iC 



1878 Isoji Ishiguro. 
** Zjentaro Mita. 

1879 Shunji Omori. 

" Kyosaburo Futami. 
** tBusuke Nojiri. 

1880 Yasuto Koshiba. 
Tahenobu Oka. 
Motogoro Aoki. 

i88i Naoji Shiraishi. 
" Ryuta Hara. 
** Tetsuo Tsuchida. 

1882 Teizaburo Nakahara. 
** Takeshi Miura. 

1883 Yeiji Nakajima. 
** Gonpei Oya. 

1884 Genjiro Yamazaki. 

1885 Yoshichika Wada. 



Mitsugu Sengoku. 

Kano Tachibana. 
tWataru Shimizu. 

Yoshitsugu Kurata. 
Benjiro Kusakabe. 
fHiide Koshizuka. 
Byutaro Nomura. 
tSanichi Shimomura. 
Ninao Ishida. 
Kyozo Kumakura. 
f Katsura Nagasaki. 
Sentaro Kondo. 
Yoshishige Noguchi. 



tDead. 



UST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHBR GRADUATES* 



30^ 



MINING AND METALLURGY. 



Year of 
<iraduation. 



1879 Wataru Watanabe. 
" IchizO Okada. 

188 1 RentarO Hotta. 

1882 Kageyoshi Noro, 
«* Yoshitada Oki. 

" Kydda Oyagi. 

1883 Osamu Yamagata. 
" Teisho Taguchi. 

1884 Naoki Ishikawa. 

1885 Naoya Yamada. 



Shachio Kawano. 



Shinji Harada. 
Yoshinori Wada. 

Takeichiro Matsuda. 
Kasaku Nakano. 

Haruo Tajima. 



GEOLOGY. 



1879 Bunjiro Koto. 
a88o Tadatsugu Kochibe. 
" Matsgjir5 Nishi\ 
a 88 1 tTakao Fujitani. 

1882 Matajiro Yokoyama. 
** Akira Yamada. 

1883 Toshi Suzuki. 

1884 tSojiro Miura. 

1885 Tadayuki Nasa. 



Denkiclri Yamashita. 



Kenzd Nakajima. 



fYasushi Kikuchl. 



Tsunahiro Tada. 



MATHEMATJCS. 



1884 Toyoo Takahashi. 

1885 Jikei Hojo. 



Kyonosuke Kumazawa. 



t Dead. 



3IO UST \0F GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES, 



Teikokn Daigakd. 



RIGAKUSHI. 
MATHEMATICS. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1888 Kokichi Kana 

1889 TsutO Motoda. Jutaro Kawai. 

1890 Iwasaburo Sugiyama. 

1891 Tosaburo Mori. 

1892 Kisaburo Matsui. 
i8g5 Kokichi Mitimufa. 

1896 Isao Watanabe. Kokuro Yoshida. 



< • I 



ASTRONOMY. 



1888 Shin Hirayama. KeizabiirO Ashmo. 

1889 Shonosuke lijima. . v: ;;; - 
1892 Sakaye KM^fiJ ^'^f*'^^^ '^ • '" 



PHYSICS. 

1886 Jun Hira3'ama, Masumi Saneyoshi. 

1887 Hantaro Nagaoka, 

1888 Shunkichi Kimura. 

1890 Fusakichi Omori. Toshinojo Mizuno. 
** Kenji Tsuruda. 

1891 Goichi S^vvada. 

1892 Kiutaro Miyamoto. Seiji Nakamura. 



( 









I. 






» » 









LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



3H 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1893 Tei Noda. 
Yasusaku Iwaoka. 
Matazo Yendo. 

1894 Yoshijiro Kato. 



(( 



(( 



Tatsuto Ota. 
Kenso Ujiiye. 

Ushinosuke Tange. 
Tomokichi Nakamura. Yoshibumi Kawai. 
Yekizo Shinowara. Akitsune Iniamura. 
Yeisuk6 Oshima. 

1895 Takuro Tamaru. Yeitaro Sakai. 
Shinz6 ShinjO. Denjiro Suto. 
tTokinosuke Kumagaya. Jin Tachihara. 

October 1895. Rokushiro Tsuruda. 

1896 Shizuo Sano. Chinzo Tomoda. 
Toraki Seto. Hanroku Yasaka. 
Hidemori Nishi. Yoshitame Uraguchi. 
Masayasu Hattori. Takeshi Shinowara. 



{( 



ti 



it 



t( 



(( 



li 



it 



a 



CHEMISTRY. 



1886 Kiyotoshi Makino. 

1889 Kikunaye Ikeda. 

1890 Seihachi Hada. 
** Yataro Horichi. 

1892 Yukichi Osaki. 

1893 Toyotaro Kamiya. 

1894 T6z5 Omori. 

1895 Tokuzo Saito 

1896 Koichi Matsubara. 
** Shizuo Hirao. 

— -■■ - _ ^ J -J I 

fDead. 



Masataka Ogawa. 
Tajird Ichioka. 



Masumi Chikashige. 



Kanzo Takei. 



*««^waMw«-i 



1 



312 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



ZOOLOGY. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1886 ShogorO Tsuboi. 

1888 Ichiro Shishido. 

1889 Masamaru Inaba. 

1890 Seitaro Goto. 

1891 Keisho Matsui. 

1892 Tsunenobu Fujita. 

1893 tSadamori Hirota. 

1894 Usamaru Takakura. 

1895 J^u^a Hara. 

1896 Tatsuo Aida. 



Kamakichi Kishigami. 



Senz5 Omori. 



BOTANY. 



1886 
1887 
1889 
1890 
189 1 
1892 
1895 



(( 



Mitsutaro Shirai. 

tChikaye Tsuge. 

Manabu Miyoshi. 

Seiichiro Ikeno. 

Seitaro Hon*. 

Kenjiro Fujii. 
Atsushi Yasuda. 

Shinzo Oka. 



Naomaro Oyatsu. 



Kintaro Okamura. 



Tsutsumi Ichimura. 



GEOLOGY. 

1887 Kotora Jinbo. Senichi Otsuka. 

1888 Shoshiro Matsushima. Hatsujiro Shibata. 

1889 Narataro Kaneda. 



fDead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES* 



313 



i 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1890 Ikutaro Asai. 

1892 Manjiro Yamagami. 

1893 TetsugorO Wakixnizu. 

1894 Tadasu Hiki. 

1895 Naokata Yamazaki. 
Mitsutaka Shimizu 
Denzd Sato. 

1896 Takuji Ogawa. 
Kinosuke Inouye. 



•< 



(( 



(i 



YamajirO Ishii. 
tlichiro Chiga. 

Chozo Iwasaki. 
Narinori Shimomura. 



Komaba Nogakko. 



(( 



(( 



(( 



NOGAKUSHI. 

AGRICULTURE. 

March 1880 +Koz6 Enomoto. Kizo Tamari. 

Seiko Kusano. Yukichi Sakabe. 

Kazuuji Ushimura. Zenjiro Sasaki. 
Gisaburo Sakuma. tXatsuichi Ushioda. 

1880 Tokiyoshi Yokoi. Tsuneakira Sako. 
tChikara Ouchi. Hidenosuke Imai. 

Hajime Watanabe. Yoshishige Otsuka. 
Kamezo Yamamoto. 
Noriyoshi Oshikavva. 
tSeitaro Harada. 
Noritaka Tsuneto. 



June 



<( 



(( 



K 



U 



H 



It 



It 



Jun Sawano. 
Hajime Aoyama. 
Hyakusuke Ibara. 
Mankichi Saito. 
tKennosuke Taniguchi. Sho Takahashi. 



t Dead. 



314 LIST. OFV.GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 

Year of . 
Graduation 

June 1880 YosaburO Sakuma. Harukichi Obana. 

Motoyasu Nakamura. +Yasabur6 Komiya. 

tSh6ichi Tsuda. Yonekuma Miyoshi. 

1885 Setsusabuaro Tanaka. +Hachiro Tamai. 
Bunnoshin Konishi. TaijirO Yamaguchi. 
Akira Shito. Choji Yoshida. 
Tetsuya Onda. Tamotsu Akiyama. 

" Ryoji Yamanaka. fKakusaburo Furusawa; 
** Kumeshiro Saito. 

1886 Kozaburo Okada. fKanjiro Yoshikawa, 
** Kosuke Honda. Teiichiro Kugahara. 
** Tokunosuke Ijichi. Shinichiro Okada. i 
** ShozO Kusuvvara. Shiro Chishiki. 1 
** Toyotaro Katada. Bun Funaki. 

Kyunojo Tawara. Umetaro Fukuiye. 



tt 






tt 



** Masayoshi Matsuzaki. HyoshirO Tachibana. 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

1886 Yoshinao Kozai. Shintaro Ishii. 

** Hikomatsu Yoshida. Matsujiro Kamoshita. 
Genjir6 Hayakawa. 



t( 



NOGEI-KAGAKUSHL 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

1883 Jun Sawano. Tsuneakira Sako. 

** Hidenosuke Imai, Noriyoshi Oshikawa. 

t Dead. 



X-IST OF GAKUSHI.AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



315 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1883 Hyak.ysuke Ibara. 
1885 Toyozo Yoshii. 

Kingo Ogasawara. 

YentarO Kakizaki. 

Misao Matsuoka. 



<< 



<( 



Kenzo Oku. 
Matataro Ota. 
Masahiro Hineno. 



<( 



Tokyo NOringakko. 



NOGAKUSHL 



AGRICULTURE. 



1887 Makoto Sawamura. 
** Katsutomo Tojo, 

Masato Toyonaga. 
tMoriaki Shiki. 
Yuya Obayashi. 
Shoshiro Nakajima. 

1888 Eijiro Yoshida. 
tYoshiro Kurashima. 
Bunichiro Minari. 
Kojiro Hi rata. 
Iwajiro Honda. 
tToyozo Umeno. 



ti 



it 



It 



a 



n 



i( 



{( 



(( 



(( 



Yotaro Mori. 
Jinsuke Nomura. 
Kiyohiko Mishiro. 
Tamotsu Kitagaki. 
jKeisuke Fujimura. 
tMasatsune Tanaka. 
Daikichi Sato. 
Fusajiro Kobayashi. 
Muneyoshi Nagaoka. 
Toshiya Yamanaka. 
InoQuke Fujishima, 



(Graduated at the College of Agriculture.) 
1890 Yasunosuke Kagami* Toyotaro Yamada. 



t Dead. 



ji6 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES, 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1890 Imasu Ota. Gisuk6 Kumano. 

** Shigejiro Kumagaye. 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 



1890 Saburo Shinjo 



Hatsujiro Sakand. 



Teikoku Daigaku- 



AGRICULTURE. 
(isT Section.) 



1891 Hitoshi Nakamura.' 
Ginkichi Ojima. 
Kosaku Horio. 
Noboru Shahana. 
Kan^o Takata. 

1892 Tadamasa Miyabara. 
Suketeru Kikkawa. 
Kametaro. Toyarha. 
tKumajiro Kikuchi. 



(( 



<( 



I* 



it 



« 



(( 



« 



<( 



<( 



tt 



« 



i( 



Shigemoto Kato. 
Shoji Nakagawa. 
Hidezo Ikeda. 
KeitarO Homma. 

Kenkichi Obata. 
Tatsushiro Kagayama. 
SOshichiro Takeda. 
Gonshiro Haruna. 
Tatsuo Kano. 



Kono lida. 
Tatsuichiro Shigematsu. Butaro Suzuki. 
HayatarO Kusakabe. Seji Suga. 
Shigetane Ishiwata. Toyotaro Seki. 
Seigo Komatsu. SadajirO Yema. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 

Graduation. 



1892 Ihachi Yasaki. 
Hikotar6 One. 
Ki Hara, 



n 



it 



TokukichirO Abe. 
Kanaye Nakamura. 



317 



NOGAKUSHI. 



AGRICULTURE. 



1894 Ippei Inagaki. 
Ikusaburo Sagisaka. 
Tatsusaburo Kido. 
Hideji Kishi. 
Ya Mitsuhashi. 
Toraji Kusakado. 
Chujiro Kasama. 
Hideo Yoshida. 

1895 Yeizaburo Uyeno. 
Jir5 Kawara. 
Yutaro Sasaki. 

Tomoteru Akaboshi. 
Naojiio Miura. 
Shintaro Hatsumi. 
Takahisa Matsukuma. 

1896 Tozaburo Tsukida. 
Telzo ItO. 
Todomu Kimura. 
Yasujuro Hashimoto. 
Ikutaro Kuroki. 
Chojiro Ikeda. 
Haruji Fujimoto. 



«( 



<( 



i( 



(( 



it 



<< 



it 



<i 



(( 



(I 



(( 



(( 



a 



It 



it 



tt 



tt 



tt 



tt 



Harutaka Takatori. 
Nobutaro Onuki. 
Iwataro Gohara. 
Setsuji Kurano. 
Kiushiro Yokoyama. 
Shunkuma Okubo. 
Kichizo Nishigaki. 
Totaro Ishiyama. 
HirotarO Ando. 
Kashiro Nitta. 
Suyeo Kato. 
Jojiro Adachi. 
Yasutaro Takebayashi. 
Kumata Hayashi. 
Matsujiro Umase. 
Junzo Omori. 
Yukichi Ida. 
Toraji Tanaka. 
Shinichi Aoki. 
Bunka Uyeda. 
Chotaro Harizuka. 
Tetsu Shirasaka. 



3i8 



UST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



Year of 
G raduation 



1896 Riugo ItO. 
" Chugo Kobayashi. 



Motohiko Hattori. 



AGRICULTURE. 



(2ND Section.) 



1 89 1 Tsunejiro Ikawa. 

** Teiichi Uchiyama. 

1892 Shokichi Machida. 
** Kokichi Mivake. 



Koremasa Yamada. 



Ichisuke Naoi. 



NOGAKUSHI. 
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 



1894 Kikuji Yabe. 
Kiutaro Yagi. 
Wakindo Yamashita. 
Junjiro Ishii. 
Chotaro Tsuji. 

1895 Kiyohisa Yoshimura. 
** Hisaye Sato. 

1896 Umetaro Suzuki. 
Tctsuji Miyachi. 
Naganari Mayeno. 
Yeijiuro Nishimura. 
Mitsutaro Shimada. 

October 1896 Tomeji Nakamura. 



li 



tt 



It 



a 



n 



it 



ii 



It 



Junshiro Okumura. 
Gintaro Daikubara. 
Michit6 Tsukamoto. 
Kitsuju Takahashi. 
Gentaro Koshima^ 
Yoshimichi Kinoshita* 
Seiga Inouye. 
Toichiro Hanai. 
Teppei Ishizuka. 
Iwao Kusunoki. 
Sanjiro Aoyama. 



LIST OF GAGUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



319 



Tokyo Noringakko. 



RINGAKUSHI. 
FORESTRY. 



Year of 
Gradaution. 



1886 Masatada Ezaki. Ryujiro Nakagawa. 

** Yosaburo Tamachi. Seijiro Homma. 

1886 Kamesaburo Sugihara. Masamori Arita. 
Masakichi Nagata. Takeyo Matsui. 
Yoshinari Katayama. 
Yoshiyuki Funada. 
Hiroyasu Isoyama. 

1887 Juji Murata. 



It 



u 



{( 



{{ 



tNaojiro Sakurai. 
Kenzo Akiyama. 



{( 



Kakusuke Naito. 
Jusuke Ito. 
Sadamoto Kodera. 
Taro Shirakawa. 
tRokuro Yanagita. 
1888 Kunijiro Wada. 
Kitsuji Tadaki. 
tAsajiro Okumura. 
Fiji Hotta. 
Toshitora Merita. 
Katsuzo Ooka. 
Eisuke Shiwaji. 



(( 



(< 



(( 



(( 



(( 



{( 



t( 



11 



<( 



n 



Kiyozo Doke. 
tjuji Umemura. 
Seitaro Kitamura. 
Kozaburo Matsushita. 
Jingoro Mori. 

Kiyoji Tanaka. 
Yeikichi Shibata. 
Hangoro Shinozawa. 
Hidemi Matsunami. 
Masatoshi Hoshino. 
Nariaki Konishi. 
Kamekichi Yamane. 



(Graduated at the College of Agriculture.) 

1890 Zentaro Kawase. Shitaro Kawai. 

** Masayoshi Haghiguchi. Otosaku Saito. 



jDead. 



320 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1890 Uichir6 Saito. 

Junichiro Nagakura. 
Sh5z6 Mito. 



it 



<( 



(< 



(( 



<( 



<( 



Seiroku Honda. 
Takiro Miyajima. 
Manjiro Matsuura. 
Toraz5 Arita. 



Doji Kiyohara. 
Komanosuke Hayashi. Eijiro Usuki. 
Teiichi Nojiri. Toichiro Senda. 

Shinzo Suzuki. Onokichi Nakayama. 



Teikoku Daigaku- 



FORESTRY. 
1892 Shingoro Sato. Tsune Mochizuki. 



tt 



<( 



(( 



{( 



it 



(( 



(< 



ti 



u 



<( 



n 



n 



Goto Nakamuta. 
Yutaro Tanaka. 
Kioken Kimura. 
Ken Shiosawa. 
Fusakichi Uchiyama. 
Hikozo Koteda. 
tNobuo Hirota. 
Gengo Kazama. 
Tametaro Mori3'ama. 
Shiokei Inouye. 
Mataji Nishida. 
Yuzuru Mayeda. 



Tamezo lidani. 
Wasaku Sasaki. 
Michio Yaye. 
Masataro Watanabe. 
Otokichi Hara. 
Kaoru Suzuki. 
Yoshio Shibata. 
Kaisaburo Fukuda. 
Shinobu Yamaguchi. 
Shigeyasu Katsumada. 
Teijiro Aiura. 
Riutaro Miki. 



RINGAKUSHI. 



FORESTRY. 



1894 Hanshiro Migita. 



Fusakichi Koide. 



t Dead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



3^1 



(( 



n 



il 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1894 Homi Shirasawa. 
Fusayuki Hosoi. 
Fusaji Goto. 
Tadaichi Imakawa. 

March 1895 Shirota Sato. 

1895 +Tsunetar6 Hcrimoto. 
** Tomihiko Matsudaira. 

1896 Fumio Ishimaru. 
Rikikuma Matsuda. 
Tsunetaka Miyazaki. 
Yoshinao Niijima. 



Yoshijuro Tanaka. 
Shinji Yoshida. 
Mototaro Kawada. 



i( 



i( 



«( 



Shdzabur6 Mimura. 
Sadaye Okuda. 
Kozaburo Kume. 
Kojiro Oshima. 
TeizaburO Senbon. 
Teisuke Ogawa. 



Komaba Nogakko. 



JUIGAKUSHI. 
VETERINARY MEDICINE. 



1880 Katsuz6 Nishikawa. 

SCsuke Niiyama. 

Tota Makino. 

Kenkichi Tange. 

Naomichi Kuriki. 

Saburo Terada. 

Seikichi Miura. 

Moriharu Yamashita. 
1882 Giemon Sudo. 

Kd Tanaka. 

Kinzo Yajima. 



14 



IC 



«l 



l( 



«( 



(( 



it 



tt 



it 



Yuji Kishimoto. 
Goichi Suzuki. 
Keiichi Fukaya. 
Jiro Fukami. 
tTakamori Fukuyama. 
Kinji Seya. 
Yoshijiro Yabe. 

Sennosuke Katsushima. 
Sokichi Fujie. 
Harutaka Yokura. 



t Dead. 



822 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTH£R GRADUATES. 



Year of 

'Graduation. 

1882 Yuz6 Kawamura. 

Motonao Furukawa. 

KuntarS Suzuki. 

Goichi Kuwabara. 

Tokutaro Tanaka. 

Nari Mori. 

Tsuneji Murasaki. 
1885 Hatsukuma Tokishige. 

Taminosuke Kambe. 

tTaro Nambu. 

Totaro Ikoma. 

Hideshird Takamine. 

Seimei Sato. 

Gisuke Kudo. 

Torakichi Shoji. 



<( 



•u 



n 



4( 



<< 



<( 



H 



It 



(I 



(( 



(< 



(( 



(( 



Kojiro Nakagawa. 
Kaneo Mitsuoka. 
Hisashi Kuno. 
Katsunosuke Mizuhara. 
Sanenori Saito. 
f Kanji Takahashi. 
Shutoku Tsuji. 
Benji Hirosawa. 
Otojiro Ikeda. 
Yujiro Sato. 
Yaotaro Hara. 
Hikozo Okami. 
Chuichiro Tominaga. 
tYasutaro Nakae. 



Tokyo Noringakko. 



JUIGAKUSHI. 
VETERINARY MEDICINE. 



1886 KeitarO Tsuno. 
** Ochiyo Kato. 
** Tosuke Ito. 

1889 Kippei Imai. 
** Dojiro Naito. 
** Shuntaro Oi. 

October. 1889 Seiyu Kiuchi. 

1890 KOsei Tsuchimochi. 



Komanosuke Kumai. 
tToragoro Ohata. 

Hoichi Fujisaki. 
Masae Ctsuki. 
Hosaburo Tamura. 



fDead. 



LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER GRADUATES. 



sn 



Teikoku Daigaka. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE. 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1892 Kiichird Muto. 
Kinpei Saito. 
Yeijiro Yamaguchi. 
TeijirO Kani. 



Shoichi Kobayashi. 
Tsurumatsu Hamaguchi. 
Yosaburo KatO. • 
Kdnosuke Aoyama. 



Kakunosuke Minamizawa. Hiozo Uchimura. 
Junnosuke Yasui. 
1893 Mataso Isogai. 



JUIGAKUSHI. 
VETERINARY MEDICINE. 



1894 Iwakichi Kani. 
** Katsuo Hosoya. 
** Kiyoshi Iroai. 

" Kakujiro Takao. 

1895 Kotaro Ogura. 

** Motoaya Yuzuriha. 

1896 Zennosuke Harashima. 
" Kogoro Murata. 

** Tsunesaburo Ban. 



Bunya Nemoto. 
Makitard Ota. 
Jirozo Noguchi. 
Genjiro Oka. 
Hikoji Yuchi. 

Naoshi Nitta. 
Mi^unojo Nakanishi. 



324 



STUDENTS ON THE ROLL. 



STUDENTS ON THE ROLL. (October, 1896.) 

University Hall 

College of Law 

Post-graduates 



147 

55+ 
6 



( 



Law 



I 



Candidates selecting English Law \ 

for Third Examinations. 57 

Candidates selecting French Law 

for Third Exaininations. g 

Candidates selecting German Law 

for Third Examinations. 5 

Candidates selecting English Law 

for Second Examinations. 76 

Candidates selecting French Law 

for Second Examinations. 3 

Candidates selecting German Law 

for Second Examinations. 21 

Candidates selecting English Law 

for First Examinations. 116 

Candidates selecting French Law 

for First Examinations. 30 

Candidates selecting German Law 

for First Examinations. 18/ 

Candidates, for Third Examina- 

37 



Politics 



V 



tions. 

Candidates for Second Exami- 
nations. 54 

Candidates for First Examina- 
tions. 106 



335 



197 



Elective Students 16 

College of Med ici ne 

Post-graduates » . • • 4 

Students undergoing Graduation Examina- 
tions 23 



276 



STUDENTS ON THE ROLL. 325 

Medicine 143 

Pharmacy 7 

Elective Students 63 

State Medicine 36 

College of Engineering 345 

Post- Graduates 5 

Civil Engineering 100 

Mechanical Engineering 65 

Naval Architecture 28 

Technology of Arms 3 

Electrical Engineering 51 

Architecture n 

Applied Chemistry 21 

Mining nnd Metallurgy 58 

Elective Students 3 

College of Literature 248 

Post Graduates 4 

Philosophy 61 

Japanese Literature 16 

Chinese Literature 26 

Japanese History 43 

History 46 

Comparative Philology 6 

English Literature 22 

German Literature 8 

French Literature 4 

Elective Students 12 

College of Science 106 

Post-Graduates 3 

Mathematics 13 

Astronomy 5 

Physics , 33 



326 NUMBER OF GAKUSHI AND GRADUATES. 

Chemistry 19 

Zoology and Botany 6 

Zoology 5 

Botany 2 

Geology 14 

Elective Students 6 

College of Agriculture 219 

Post-graduates 4 

Agriculture 21 

Agricultural Chemistry 14 

Forestry 14 

Veterinary Medicine 3 

Eelective Students 4 

* 

Subsidiary Course in Agriculture 88 

„ Forestry 42 

,, ,, Veterinary Medicine. 29 
Grand Total 1895 



99 



NUMBER OF GAKUSHI AND GRADUATES. 

Hogakushi 714 

Horitsugakushi * 58 

Igakushi 511 

Seiyakushi 34 

Yakugakushi 12 

Kogakus hi 57 2 

Bungakushi 191 

Rigakushi 254 

Ndgakushi ; 1 37 

Nogeikagakushi 36 

Ringakushi 78 

Juigakushi 79 



NUMBER OF GAKUSHI AND GRADUATES. 327 

Jun-igakushi 6 

Graduates not gakushi of the Late Tokyo 

Hogakko 4 

Graduates of the Medical College having 

not yet received diploma formally i 

Graduates not gakushi of the late Kobu 

Daigakko 15 

Graduates not gakushi of the Agriculture 

Course 38 

Graduates not gakushi of the Forestry 

Course 26 

Graduates not gakushi of the Veterinary 

Medicine Course 12 

Grand Total 2778 

Counted more than once 7 

Actual Number 2771 

Deceased 199 



The Journals of the Medical and Science 
Colleges, the Memoirs of the Literature College 
and the Bulletins of the Agricultural College, 
all of which have been published since 1887, 
contain the followiug articles : ' 



INHALT. 

DER 

MITTHEILUNGEN AUS DER MEDICINISCHEN 

FACULAT. 

Band. 1. 

Das Contagium der Syphilis^ von Dr. J. Disse, Professor der 
pathologischen Anatomic und Dr. K. Taguchi, Professor der 
normalen Anatomie an der Kaiserlichen Uniyersitat zu Tokio. 

Zur Kenntniss der Chylurie, (aus der medicinischen Klinik der 
Herrn Professor Bjelz) von Dr. K. Murata, Assistentarzt der in- 
neren Klinik an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Lage desinnerenOhres, vonTsuKANU Imad\, Assistant-Professor 
der Anatomie der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

UAtersuchnngen tiber die Wirkung des Macleyin's auf 
den thierischen Organismus. Erste Abhandliing von 

Dr. Y. Inoko, Assistent an dem Pharmacologischen Institut an 
der Kaiserl'chen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Das Nervensystem bei fibrinOser Peneumonie, von Dr. 

. £. Bjelz^ Professor der Klinischen Medicin an der Kaiserlichen 
Unixerjj lat zu Tokio. 



2 INHALT. 

Eln Beitrag zur Kenntniss der Samen von Fharbitis 

triloba "NLieA, von K. Hirano, Assistent an dem pharmaceuti- 
schen Institut an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 
Ueber Vier Koreaner Sch&del^ von Dr. Koganei, Professor der 
Anatomie an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Beitr£lge zur Constitution des Scopoletinst von Dr. Taka- 

HASHi, Professor der Pharmacologic an der Kaiserlichen Univer- 
sitat zu Tokio. 

Arbeiten aus dem pbarmacologisichen Institut* I Un- 
tersuchungen tiber die pupillenerweiternde Wirkung 

der ESphedrins^ von Dr. D. Takahashi, Professor der Pharma- 
kologie und Dr. M'iura, Assistant der inneren Klinik an der 
Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Toxikologiscbes tlber einen japanischen Giftscbwamm, 

von Dr. Y. Inoko, Assistent an dem Pharmacologischen Institut 
an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Arbeiten aus dem pbarmacologiscben Institut- II. Un- 
tersuchungen tiber einen Bestandtheil der Scutel- 
laria lanceolaria, von Dr. Takahashi, Professor der Pharma- 
cologie an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Ueber die giftigen Bestandtbeile und Wirkungen des 
japanischen Fantherschwammes (Amanita panthe- 

rina)^ von Dr. Y. Inoko, Assistent-Professor der Pharmacologic 
an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Ueber die Einfltlsse einiger Thierblutarten auf Mill- 

brandbacillen^ (Aus dem hygienischen Institut) von Dr. M, 
Ogata, Professor an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio, und 
Yasuhara. 

Ueber die japanische Baldrianwurzel^ (Kisso) von Dr. Y. 

Shimoyama, und K. Hirano. Mittheilung aus dem pharmaceu- 
tischen Institute an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Ueber Ficrasma eilantoides Flanch, von Dr. Y. Shimoyama, 

Professor der Pharmacie an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio 
und K. Hirano (Assistent). 

Ueber den Narcotingehalt einiger einheimischen Opiu- 

msorten^ von K. Uyeno (Pharmaceut). 

Untersucbungen tiber die Kost Studenten der Kaiserli- 
chen UniVCrsit&t zu TokiO^ (aus dem hygienischen Institut) 



INHALT. 3 

von Dr. J. Tsuboi Assistent-Professor an der Kaiserlichen Uni- 
versitat zu Tokio, uud Dr. H. Murata Militararzt der Armee. 

TJeber die Einfltlsse einiger Thierblutarten auf einige 

pathologene Bacterien, (Aus dem hygienischen Institut) von 
Dr.M. Ogata, Profesror der Hygiene an der Kaiserlichen Uni- 
versilat zu Tokio, und Yasuhara. 

Beitr^e zur Kenntniss des Fugngifbes, von Dr. d. Taka- 

HASHi, und Dr. Y. Inoko, Assistent- Professor an der Kaiserlichen 
Universitat zu Tokio, 

Zur Kenntniss von einer neuen^ ungesftttigten Feft- 

safire^ von Dr. Y. Shimoyama, Professor der Pharmacie an der 
Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Ueber die Alkaloide von Datura alba nees, von Dr. Y 

Shimoyama, Professor der Pharmacie an der Kaiserlichen Univer- 
sitat und T. KojiMA {Pharmaceut). 

Ueber das Vorkommen des Thymels im setherischen 

Oele von Mosula japonica^ von Dr. Y. Shimoyama, Profes- 
sor der Pharmacie an der Kaiserlichen Universitat und H. Ono 
{Pharmaceut) 

Band II. 



Bei»:rage zur physischen An*:hropologie der Aino- I. 

UntersUCbungen am Skelet- Von Dr. Koganei, Professor 
der Anatomic an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 

Beitrage zur physischen Anthropologie der Aino. II' 

UntersUChungen an Lebenden, Von Dr Koganei, Pro- 
fessor der Anatomie an der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 



Band III. 



Kephrophages Sangainarius, ein neuer menschlicher 
Parasit in Urogenitalapparat, Von Dr. H. Miyake, As- 

sistentarzt und Dr. J. ocriba, Professor aus der Chirurgischen 
KUnik der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. 



4 INHALT. 

Zvr Frage der Fettbildung aus Eiweiss im ThierkOrper- 

Von Dr. M. Kumagawa, Professor der Medicinishen Chemie an 
der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokio. Unter Mitwirkung von G\ 
Kaneda, vornialigem Assistenten des Medicinisch-Chemischen 
Laboratorium an derselben Universitat. 

Mit*:heilung8n aiis dem pharmaceutischen Institute der 
Kaiserlich-Japanischen University zu Tokio (Ja- 

p!Jn) Von Dr. Y. Shimoyama, Professor der Pharmacie daselbst. 

Ueber die Sporozoa (Gregarinen) der Vaccinelymphe 
und deren Bedeutung far die Krankheit. Von Prof^ 

Masanori Ogata. Aus dem hygienischcn Institut der Universitat 
zu Tokio. 

Ueber die Festepidemie in Hcng-Kong im Jahre 1894- 

Von Dr. T. Aovama, Professor der inneren Medicin an der Kaiser- 
lichen Universitat zu TokiO. 



CCNTENTS. 

OF 

THE MEiMOIRS OF THE LITERATURE C0LLI:GE. 

No. I. 



The Language^ Mythology^ and Geological Nomencla- 
ture of Japan viewed in the Light of Aino Studies. 

B3' BasiL Hall Chambrklain, Professor of Japanese and Philolo- 
gy in the Imperial University; including " An Ainu Grammar " 
by John Batchelor, Church Missionary Society. 



CONTENTS 

OF 

THE JOURNAL OF THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

Vol. I. 
(With 29 Plates.) 



On the Life History of Ugixniya Sericaria. Rondani. By 

C. Sasaki Rigakushi^ Professor in the Agricultural and Dendro- 
logical College, TokyO. {Plates I-VI.) 

Notes on Distoma Endemicum^ Baelz. By Isao Ijima, Ph. 

D., Professor of Zoology^ Imperial University. (Plate VII,) 

Comparison of Earthquake Diagrams simultaneously 
obtained at the Same Station by two Instruments 
involving the same Principle^ and thereby proving 
the Trustworthiness of these instruments- By Sei- 

KEi Sekiya, Professor of Seismology, Imperial University. 
{Plates VIII-XI.) 

Ueber die Deformation der Metallplatten durch Schlei- 

fen. Von Dr. Phil. H. Muraoka, Professor der Physik, Erste 
Hohere Mittelschule. 
A note on Glancophane. By B. Koto, Ph, D., Professor of 
Geology, Imperial University. {Plate XII *) 

Mercury Sulphites, and the Constitution of Oxygencus 

Salts* By Edward Divers, M. D., F. R. S., Professor of 
Chemistry, Imperial Universrt)', and Tetsukichi Shimidzu, M. E.- 
of the Chemistry Section of the Department of Agriculture and 
Commerce. 

On the Reduction ef Nitrites to Hydroxyamine by 
Hydrogen Sulphide, By EdwardDivers, m. d. f. r. s" 

Professor of Chemistry, Imperial University, and Tamemasv 
Haga, M. S. C. I., Assistant- TJrofessor of Chemistry, Imperii 
University. 



CON TUNIS. 7 

Beitrage zur Theorie der Bewegung der Erdatxnosph&re 

Und der Wirbelsttlrme- Von Dr. Phil. DiRd Kitao, Professor 
fur Physik und Mathematik an der Kaiserlichen Forstlichlandwirth- 
schaftlichen Academic zu T6kyd. {HUrsu Tofel XIII.) 

On the Formation of the Germinial Layers In Chelonia- 

By K. MiTSUKURi, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology, and C. Ishikawa, 
Assistant in Zoology, Imperial University. {Plates XIV-XVII,) 

On the Caudal and Anal Fins of Gold fishes- By s. 

Watase, Nogakushiy of the Sapporo Agricultural College and of 
the Imperial University. (Plates XVIII XX.) 

Some Kotes on the Giant Salamander of Japan (Cryi>- 
tobranchus Japanicus. Van der Hoeven). By D. Sasaki, 

Rigakushi, Professor in the Agricultural and Dendrological College, 
Tdkyo. 
A Pocket Galvanometer* By A. Tanakadate, Assistant-Pro- 
fessor of Physics, Imptrial Universit)'. 

Some Occarrences of Fiedmontite in Japan- By b. Kot^, 

Ph, D., Professor of Geology, Imperial University. {Plate XXl ) 

The Severe Japan Earthquake of the 15th of January* 

1887* By S. Sekiya, Professor of Seismology, Imperial University. 
(Plates XXII-XXIV.) 

Notes on the Electric Properties of Nickel and Pal- 
ladium* By C. G. Knott, D. Sc. (Edin*), F. R. S. E., Professor 
of Physics, Imperial University. 

Note on the Constants of a Lens* By a Tanakadate, Assi- 
stant Professor of Physic, Imperial University. 

Ueber einige Tricladen Europa's. By Isao Ijima, Ph. d., 

Professor of Zoology, Imperial University. (Plate XXV.) 

A Model Showing the Motion of an Earth-Particle dur- 
ing an Earthquake. By Seikei Sekiya, Professor of Seismo- 
logy, Imperial University. (Plates XXV-XXVII). 

On Aluminium in the Ashes of Flowering Plants. By 

HikorokurO Yoshida, F. C. S., Assistant-Professor of Chemistry, 
Imperial University. 

The Effect of Dilution and the Presence of Sodium Salts 
and Carbonic Acid upon the Titration of Hydroxya- 

mine by Iodine. By Tamemasa Haga, F. C. S., Assistant- 
Professor of Chemistry, Imperial University. 



8 CONTENTS. 



Notes on a Large Crystal Sphere. Ky Cargiii G. Knott, d. 

Sc, F. R. S. E , Professor of Physices, Imperial University. 

Marine Biological Station of the Imperial Univer&ity at 

Misaki' By Kakichi Mitsukuri, Ph. D., Prefessor of Zoology 
Imperial University. {Plates XXVIII-XXIX.) 



Vol. II. 

(With 27 Plates). 



Ueber die Parstellbarkeit Willkurlicher Function durch 
Reihen die nach den wurzeln einer transcendenten 
Gleichung fortschreiten. Von Dr. Ph. R. Fujisawa. 

Rigakushi. 
On the Composition of Bird Lime- By Edward Divers, M. 
v. J F. R. S., Professor, and Michitada Kawakita, M. E., F. C. S., 
Assistant-Professor of Chemistry, Imperial University. 

On Anorthite from Miyakejima. By Yasushi Kikughi, Ri- 
gakushi, Assistant-Professor of Geology, Imperial University. 
{Plate I.) 

The Source of Bothriocephalas latus in Japan- By Isao 

IjiMA. Rigakushi, Ph. D., Professor of Zoology, Imperial University. 

£arohquake Measurements of Recent years especially 
relating to Vertical Motion- By Seikei Sekiya, Profes- 
sor of Seismology, Imperial University. 

On the so-called Crystalline Schists of Chichibu (The 

Samba-gawan Series). By BunjirO Koto, Rigakushi, Ph. 
D., Professor of Geology, Imperial University, {Plates II -V.) 
On thePlantsof Sulphur Island- By SamurO OkubO Assistant- 
Professor of Botany, Imperial University. 

Some New Cases of the Occurrence of Bothriocephalus 

ligUloides Lt- By Isao Ijima, Rigakushi, Ph. D. and KentarS 
Murata, Igakushi, {Plates V, bis.) 

A Magnetic Survey of all Jepan, carried out, by order of 
the President of the Imperial University- By Cargil^ 

G. Knott, D. Sc. (Edin) F. R. S. E., Professor, and Aikitsu 
HANakadate, Rigakushi, Assistant -Professor of Physics, Imperial 
Uuiversity. {Plates VI-XV.) 



CONTENTS. 9 

^determination of the Thermal Conductivity of Marble 

By KenjirS Yamagawa, Rigakuhaktishi, Ph. B., professor of 
Physics, Imperial University. 

-Combined Effects of Torsion and Longitudinal Stress 
on the Magnetization, of Nickel. By H. Nagaoka, Ri- 

gakushi, {Plates XVI-XIX.) 

On the Magnetization and Retentiveness of Nickel 
Wire under combined Torsional and Longitudinal 

Stresses* By H. Nagaoka, Rigakushi, (Plates XX-XXIV.) 

Specific Volume of Camphor and of Bomeol determined 
• with Proximate Accuracy. By mitsuru Kuhara, Rigaku- 

shi. Ph. D. 

Beitrage zur Theorie der Bewegung der ErdatmosphSre 

Und der Wirbelsttirme. Von Dr. Phil. DirO Kitao, Profes- 
sor fur Physik und Mathematik an der Kaiserlichen Forstlich- 
landwirthschaftlichen Academie zu T6ky6. (Hierzu Tafel XXV- 
XXVI.) 

Note on the Specific Volumes of Aromatic Compounds. 

By J5ji Sakurai, F. C. S., Professer of Chemistry, Imperial 
University. 



Vol. III. 

(With 30 Plates.) 



Jurassic Plants from Kaga, Hida^ and Echizen. By 

Matajiro Yokoyama, Rigakushi. {Plates I-XIX.) 

On Froxenic Components in certain Volcanic Rocks 

from Bonin Island. By Yasushi Kikuchi, Rigakushi^ As- 
sistant-Professor of Geology, Imperial University. {Plates XIV. 
bis,) 
The Eruption of Bandaisan* By S. Sekiya, Professor of Seis- 
mology and Y. Kikuchi, Rigakushi, Assistant-Professor of Geolo- 
gy, Imperial, University. {Plates XV-XXIV,) 

On Magnetic Lagging and Priming in Twisted Iron and 

Nickel Wires. By Cargill G. Knott. D. Sc. (Edin.). F. R, 
S. E., Professor of Physics, Imperial University. {Plate XXV- 
XXVI,) 



lO CONTENTS. 

Effecb of Twist on the Magnetization of Nickel and 

Iron* Ky H. Nagaoka, Rigakushiy Imperial University. {Plate 
XXV 11.) 

Ozyamidosulphonates and their Conversion into Hypo- 

ni'irites. By Edward Divsrs, M. D., F. R. S., Professor, and 
Tamemasa Haga, F. C. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Im- 
perial University. 

On a Condensation Product of Acstone and Aldehy- 

dammonia* By Mitsuru Kuhara, Ph. D. 

Capillary Attraction in Relation to Chemical Composi- 
tion, on the Basis of R. Schiff's Data- By K. Ik^da 

Rigakushij Imperial University. 

Determination of the Elements of the Sun's Spin. By- 

S. HiRAVAMA, Rigakushi, Imperial University. 

On the Fineness of the One Yen Silver Coin. By Yoshi, 

MASA KOOA, Rigakiishi, F. C. S., and Osamu Yamagata, Rigaku- 
shiy Assayers in the Imperial Mint at Osaka. 

On Cordierite as Contact Mineral. By Yasushi KiKucHir 

Rigakuskl Assistant-Professor of Geology, Imperial University. 
(Plate XXVIII.) 

Transient Elective Currents produced by twisting 
Magaetized Iron, Steel and Nickel wires- By H. 

Nagaoka, Rigakushiy Imperial University. (Plates XXIX-XXX,) 



Vol. IV. 

(With 40 Plates.) 



On the FoBtal Membranes of Chelonia (Contributions 
to the Embryology of Reptilia II-). By K. Mitsukuri, 

Ph. D., Rigakuhakushi, Professor of Zoology, Imperial University* 
(Plates I'X.) 

On the Development of Araneina- By Kamakichi Kishino- 

UYE, Rigakushif Science College, Imperial University. (Plates 
X-XVI.) 

Observations on Fresh- Water Polyzoa- (Pccttinatella geia- 

tiosa, nov. Sp.) by A. Oka, Imperial University. (Plates XVII- 
XX,) 



CONTENTS. II 



On Diolozoon Nipponicum, N. Sp. By Seitaro Got«, Ri. 

grnkushi. Post Graduate Student in Zoology, Imperial University. 
(Plah's XXI'XXIII.) 

A New Species of Hymenomycetoars Fungus Injurious 
to the Mulberry Tree. By Nobujiro Tanaka. (Plates 

XXIV'XXVII.) 

Notes on the Irrit:abilif; of the Stigma. By M. Miyoshi, 

Rigakushi, {Plates XXVIII-XXIX.) 

Notes on the. Development of the Suprarenal Bodies in 

the Mouse. By Masamaro Inaba, Rigakushi, (Plates XXX- 
XXXI,) 

On Some Fossil Plants from the Coal-bearing Series of 

NagatO* By MatajirO Yokoyama, Bigakuhakushif Professor of 
Geology, Imperial University. (Plates XXXI 1 1 -XXXIV.) 

Comparison of Earthquake Measurements made in a 
Pit and on the Surface on the Ground. By s. Sekiya, 

Rigakuhakushiy Professor and F. Omori, Rigakushi^ Assistant of 
Seismology, Imperial University. 
Laboratory Notes- By C. G. Knott, Dr. Sc, F. R. S. E., Profes- 
sor of Physics, Imperial University. 

Difiraction Phenomena produced by an Aperture on a 

Curved Surface. By H. Nagaoka, Rigakushi Assistant- Pro- 
fessor of Physics Imperial University. 

Effect cf Magnetization on the Permanent Twist of 

Nickel Wire. By H. Nagaoka, Rigakushi^ Assistant-Profes- 
sor of Physics, Imperial University. (PlateXXXVIII.) 

On Certain Thermoelectric Effects of Stress in Iron^ 

By C. G. Knott, D. Sc, F. R. S. E., Professor of Physicr*, and S. 
KiMURA, Rigakushi f Imperial University. (Plate XXXIX,) 

On some Cretaceous Fossils from Shikoku- By Matajiro 

YoKOYAMA, Rigaknhakushiy Professor of Geology, Imperial Uni- 
versity (Plate XL,) 



Vol. V. 

(With 35 Plates.) 



Studies on Reproduc»:ive Elements, i. Spermatogenesis, 



12 CONTENTS- 

Ovogenesis, and Fertilization in Diplomus sp. By C. Ishikawa., 
Ph D., Rigakuhhkushi^ Professor of Zoology, Agricultural College, 
Imperial University. (Plate 7.) 

Farther Studies on the Formation of the Germinal 

Layers in Chelonia {Contributions to the Embryology of 
Reptilia III.) By K. Mitsukuri, Ph. D., Rigakuhakushi Professor 
of Zoology, Science College, Imperial University. (Plates II-IVJ) 

On the Development of Limolns Longispina. By Kama- 

KicHi KisHiNouYE, /?/^nJtM5/i/, Science College, Imperial University 
(PlatesV-XL) 

On the Lateral Eyes of the Spider. By Kamakichi Kishino- 

UYE, Rigakushi^ science College, Imperial University. 

Notes on a Collec»:ion of Birds from Tsushima. By I. 

IjiMA, Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Plate XII.) 

On the Formation of the Germinal Layers in Petromy- 

ZOn. By S. Hatta, Zoological Laboratory, Science College. 
(Plates XIII-XIV.) 

The Disturbance of Isomagnetics attending the Mino- 

Owari Earthquake of 189L By A. Tanakadate, Rigaku- 
hakushi, F. R. S. E., Professor of Physics, and H. Nagaoka, 
Rigakushi, Assistant- Professor of Physics, College of Science, 
Imperial University. (Plates XV -XXI I.) 
Optical Note* By K. Takizawa. 

The Archaean Formation of the Abukuma Blateau- By 

B. Koto, Ph. D., Rigakuhakushi, Professor of Geology, College 
of Science, Imperial University. (Plates XXII-XXVII.) 

On the Cause of the Great Earthquake Lin Central 

Japan^ 189L By B. Koto, Ph. D- Rigakuhakushi, Professor of 
Geology, College of Science, Imperial University. Plates XXVIII- 
XXXV.) 

Vol. VI. 

(With i8 Plates.) 



Detnrmination of the Temperature of Steam arising 
from Boiling Salt Solutions- By j. Sakurai, f. c. s.,. 

Professor of Chemistry, Science Collage, Imperial University 
(Plate I,) 



CONTENTS. 13 

Notes on an Observation by Gerlach of the Boiling 
Point of a Solution of Glauber s Salt By j. Sakurai, 

F. C. S., Professor of Chemistry, Science College, Imperial Uni- 
versity. 

Modification of Backmann's Boiling Method of deter- 
mining Molecular Weights of Substances in Solution. 

By J. Sakurai, F. C. S., Proferssor of Chemistry, Science College, 
Imperial University. 

A Simple Experiment in Chemical Kinetics. By. K. Ikeda, 

Rigakushi. 
Imidosulphonates. By E. Divers, M. D., F. R. S., Professor, and 
T. Haga, F. C. S., Assistant Professor, Imperial University. 

On the Anatomy of Magnoliacese. By s. Matusda, Science 

College, Imperial University. (Plates II-V.) 

Researches on the Multiplication of Elliptic Functicns. 

By R. FujiSAWA, Professor of Mathematics, Imperial University. 

On the Process of Gastralation in Chelonia. (Contribution 

to the Embryology of Reptilia IV.) By K. Mitsukuri, Ph. D., 
Rigakuhaktiihi^ Professor of Zoology, College of Science, Imperial 
University. (Plates VI -VI 1 1,) 

Note on the Eyes of Cardium Muticum Reeve. By K. 

KiSHiNOUYE, Rigakushi f Zoologist to the Department of Agriculrure 
and Commerce. (Plate IX.) 

Note on the CoBlomic Cavity of the Spider. By K. Kishi- 

NOUYE, Rigakushi, Zoologist to the Department of Agriculture and 
Commerce. (Plate X.) 

Studies of Reproductive Elements, n. Noctiiuca miiiaris, 

Sur.; its Division and Sporeformation. By C. Ishikawa, Ph. D.^ 
Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Professor of Zoology, Agricultural 
College, Imperial University. (Plates XI-XIV,) 

On the Sero-Ammotic Connection and the Foetal Me- 
mbranes in the Chick. By S. Hirota, Rigakushiy Zoological 
Institute, Imperial University. (Plates XV-XVII,) 

On a New Human Tape- Worm (Bothriocephalus Sp.) By 

I. IjiMA, Ph. D. Rigakushi, Rigakuhakushi, Professor of Zoology, 
Imperial University, and T. Kurimoto, Igakttshi, Professor in the 
Fifth Higher Middle School, Nagasaki. (Plate XVIII.) 



14 CONTENTS. 

Vol. VII. 

(With 29 Plates.) 
The Manufac»:ure of Calomel in Japan. By e. divers, m. 

D., F. R. S. Professor, Imperial University. {Plates I-III,) 

Ozimidosulphonates or Sulpbazotates. By E. Divers, m. 

D., F. R. S and T. Haga, F. C. S., Rigakuhakushi, 

Constitu*:ion of GlycocoU and its DerivaUves. (Appendix : 

General theory and Nomenclature of Amido-acids ) By J. Sakurai. 
F. C. 3., Rigakuhakushi f Professor of Chemistry, Imperial, Uni- 
versity. 

On the After shocks of Earthquakes. By F. Omori, Rlgakushi, 

(Plates IV -XIX,) 

IMEesozoic Plants from Kdzuke Kii^ Awa, and Tesa. By 

Matajiro Yokoyama, Rigakushij Rigakuhakushi, Professor of 
Palaeontology, Imperial University. {Plates X-XXVIII.) 

On some Organic Remains from the Tertiary Limestone 

near Sagara, Totomi. By Kvu Nishiwada. {Plate xxix.) 

Mercury and Bismuth Hypohosphi'ies. By Seihachi Hada, 

Rigakushi, College of Science, Imperial University. 

The Acid Sulpha»:e of Hydrozylamine. By Edward Divers, 

M. D., F. R. S., Professor, Imperial University. 

l^ecomposition of Sulphates by Ammonium Chloride in 
Analysis according to Presenius. By Masumi Chikashige, 

Rigakushiy College of Science, Imperial University. 

Ewart Johnstone's Way to prepare Nitric Oxide. By 

Masumi, Chikashige, Rigakushi, College of Science, Imperial 
University. 

The Acidimetry of Hydrogen Fluoride. By Tamemasa 

Haga, F. C. 3., Rigakuhakushi , Assistant Professor, and Yukich^ 
Osaka, Rigakushl, Imperial University. 

On the Poisonous Ac^on of Alcohols upon Different 

Organisms. By M. Tsukamoto, NOgakushl, 

Formulae for sn 9u. By o. Sudo. 

Formulse for sn lOu, en lOu dn lOu in terms of sn a. By E, 

Sakai, Student y College of Science, Imperial University. 



CONTENTS. 15 

The Diagram of thesemi-desfiruotiye Earthquake of June 

20th; 1394 (TokyG). By S. Sekiya, Rigakukakuski, Professor 
of Seismology* and F. Omori, Rigakushi^ Impcial University. 

Beitr&ge znr Theroie der Bewegung der Erdatmosphftre 

Und Wirbelsttlrme. Von Diro Kitao, Dr, PhiU, Professor 
fur Physik und Mathematik an der landwirthschafilichen Facultat 
der Kaiserlichen Universitat zu TOkyO. 



Vol. VIII. 

(With 36 Plates) 



Studies on the Ectoparasitio Trematodes of J^apan. By 

Seitaro Goto, Rigakushi^ Science College, Imperial University, 
{Plates I -XX VI I.) 

On Some new Japanese Land Leeches. By Asajiro Oka. 

Ph. D,, Rigakuhakushiy Science CoUegs^ Imperial University, 
Tokyo. ( With Plates XXVII I-XXX,) 

B*:udes sur la P^condation et I'Embryogenie du Ginkgo 

Blloba. Par Sakugoro Hirase, Rigakushi, Assistant an Collegs 
des Scirnces de 1 Universite imperiale de Tokyo. {With Plates 
XXXI'XXXII.) 

l>escription of Opistho ten this depressa n. sp. By i. 

IjiMA, Ph., D., Rignkuhakiishi, and S. Ikeda, Science College, 
Imperial University, Tokyo. {With Plate XXXIII,) 

On the so called Excretory Organ of Freshwater Poly- 

ZOa. By AsAjiRO Oka, Ph., D., Rigakuhakiishi, Science College, 
Imperial University, TokyO. {With Plates XXXIV-XXXV,) 

On the Dentritic Appendage of the Urogenital Papilla 

OfaSiluroid. By S. Hirota, /?/^aA«5A/, Zool, Inst., Science 
College, Imperial University, Tokyo. {With Plate XXXVI.) 



l6 CONTENTS. 



Vol. IX., Pt. I. 



On a Certain Class of Fraunhofer's Diffraction Pheno- 
mena. By H. Nagaoka, Rigakuhakushi. 

Lines of Egnal Intensity about the Point of Intersec- 
tion of Fraunhofer's Diffraction Bands. By H. Naga. 

AOK, Rigakuhakushi, 

Note on Tinfoil Grating as a Detector for Electric 

Waves. By T. MizuNo, Rigakuzhi, Professor of Physics, Daiichi 
Koto Gakko. 

The Thermo-electric Eflfec^s of Longi»:udinal Shress in 

Iron. By K. TsuRUTA, Rigaktishi, Assist Prof, of Physics, 
Science College, Imperial University. 

Therm o-elac*:ric Effects of Longitudinal Tension in 

Different Metals. By K. Tsuruta, Rigakushi, Assist Prof, 
of Physics, Science College, Imperial University. 

Notes on the Topaz from Mino. By T. Hiki, Rigakuski, 

Science College Imperial University. 
Mercury Perchlorates. By M. Chikashige, Rigakushi, Science 

College, Imperial University. 
Potassium nitrosOSUlphate. By E. Divers, M. D., F. R. s.. 

Prof, and T. Haga, F. C. S., Rigakuhakushi, Assist. Prof., Science 

College, Imperial University. 
Sodium nitrOSOSUlphate. By E. Divers, M. D., F. R. S., Prof. 

and T. Haga, F. C. S., Rigakuhakushi, Assist, Prof., Science 

College Imperial University. 

The Constitution of the Nitrososulphates. By E. Divers, 

M. D., F. R S., Prof, and T. Haga, F. C. S., Rigakuhakushi Assist, 
Prof., Science College Imperial University. 



CONTENTS 

OF 

THE BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF 

AGRICULTURE. 

Vol. I 



Fertilizer Experiments with Rice. By c. c. Georgeson, 

Professer of Agriculture, 

Researches on the Composition and Digestibility Of 
Japanese Feeding Stuffs. By Cr. o. Kellner, Professor of 

Agricultural Chemistry. 

Researches on the Composition, Treatment^ and Appli- 
cation of Night-soil as a Manure. By Dr. o. Kellner 

and Y. Mori. 

On the Valuation of Japanese Fertilizers. By Dr. Kellner, 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

Researches on the Composition of Several Japautiese 

Fertilizers. By Dr. O. Kellner, Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Researches on the Distribution of Animal and Vege- 
table Nutrients over the Produc*:s obtained from 

Rice by Whitening (Cleaning). Carried out in Conjunc- 
tion, with S. Tanaka and Kobayashi by Dr. O. Kellner, Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

On the Manufacture, Composition, and Properties of 

"Koji.*' By Y. Mori and M. Nagaoka. 

Researches on the Manufacture and Composition of 

''MisO." Carried out in Conjunction with M. Nagaoka and Y. 
KuRASHiMA by Dr. O. Kellner, Professor of Agricultural Chems- 
try. 

Experiments on the Effect of Several Nitrogenous Fer^ 

tilizers on Crops. By Dr. O Kellner, Y. Kozai, Y. Mori, 
and M. Nagaoka, > 

Researches on the Manufacture ef Various Kinds of 
Tea, and on the Nitrogenous Non-Albuminous Con- 



l8 CONTENTS. 

stitnents ef Bamboo Shoots- By Y. Kozai, Assistant in 

the Agricultural Chemical Laboratory. 

Manuring Experiments with Paddy Rice, (with 4 piatesy 

By Dr. O. Kelloner, Y. Kozai, Y. Mori and M. Nagaoka. 

Researches on the Action of Lime as Manure, with 
Special Regard to Paddy Fields- By H. Sakano, d. 

Sato, and S. ShinjO, and by Dr. O. Kelloner, Professor of Agri- 
cultural Chemistry. 

Experiments on the Cultivation of Lespedeza Bicolor, 
Turez- (Hagii as a Forage Crop. By Dr. o. Kellner, 

T. YosHii, and Nagaoka. 

Manuring Experiments with Paddy Rice- (Second 

Year, 1890 ) By Dr. O. Kellner, V. Kozai, Y. Mori, and M. 
Nagaoka. 

Manuring Experiments with Paddy Rice* (Third Year, 

189L) By Dr. O. Kellner, Y. Kozai, Y. Mori, and M. Naga- 
oka. 

Comparative Experiments of the Eflfect of Various Phos- 
phatic Manures on Upland Soil- By Dr. o. Kellner, y. 

Kozai, Y. Mo:a and M. Nagaoka. 
Analysis of Rice Grain* Carried out in Conjunction with S. 
Machida, by Dr. O. Kellner and M. Nagaoka. 



Vol. II, No. 1. 



The Energy of the Living Protoplasm, (i)* By Dr. Oscar 

LOEW, Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

On the Poisonous Action of Di-cyanogen* By o. Loew, 

and M. Tsukamoto. 



Vol. IL No. 2. 



The Energy of the Living Protoplasm. (2) By Oscar Loew, 

Ph. D., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural College, 
Imperial University. 



CJNTENTt, 19 

On the Vegetable Cheese, Natto- By k. Yabe, Nogakushi. 
On the Poisonous Action of the Hydroxyl derivatives of 
Bensol upon Yeast and Bacteria* By K. Yabe, Nogakushi. 

On theQuantity of Wood gum (Xylose) contained in Different 
kinds of Wood, By J Okumura, Nogakushi. 

On the Reserve Protein in Plants- By G. Daikuhara, No- 
gakushi, 

On the Occurrence of Mucin in Plants- By j. Ishu, no^ 

f:^akuihi, 

Mannane as a Reserve Material in the Seeds of 

DiaspyrOS Kaki, L- By J. Ishu, Nogakmhi. 

Mannane as an Article of Human Pood- By c. Tsuji, 

Nogakushi. 



Vol. II, No. 3. 



On the Scale Insect of Mulberry Trees (Diaspls Potelli* 

formiS; n- Sp-) (Plates I-II.) By C. Sasaki, Rigakuhakushi, 
Professor of Entom:)logy, Agricultural College, Imperial Univer- 
sity. 

On the Spermatogenesis of the Silk-Worm. {Plates 

IIJ-IV.) By K. Toyama, Assistant in the Zoological Institute 
Agricultural College, Imperial University. 



Vol. II, No- 4. 



The Energy of the Living Protoplasm. By Dr. Oscar 

LoEW, Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Agriculturl College, 
Imperial University. 

On the Reserve Protein in Plants. II. By G. Dairuhara, 

Nogakushi, 

On the Comsumption of Asparagine in the Natritlon 

of Plants. Bv Y. KiNOSHiTA, Nogakushi. 

On the Assimilation of Nitrogen from Nitrates and 



20 CONTENTS, 

Ammonium Salts by Phaenogams. By Y. Kinoshita, 

Nogakushi, 

On the Presence of Asparagine in the Root ef Nelumbo 

nUCifcra. By Y. Kinoshita, Nogakushi, 

On the Occurrence cf Two Kinds of Mannan in the 

Root of Conophallus konyaku. By Y. Kinoshita, No- 
gakushim 

Note the on Chemical Composition of some Mucilages. 

By R. Yoshimurny Nogakushi, 

The Preparation and Chemical Composition of Tofh. 

By M. IifONE, Nogakushi, 
Note on Nukamiso. By M. Inoue, Nogakushi. Preliminary Note 
ON THE Sake Yeast. By K. Yabe, Nogakushi, 

Note on the Behavoior of Hippuric Acid in Soils. By K. 

\'osHiMURA, Nogakushi. 

Does Hybrogen Peroxide occur in Plants ? By j. Cho. 



Vol II, No- 5. 



Die Japanischen LaubbOlzer im Winterzustande, 

BestimmungStabellen. Von H. Shirasawa, Ringakushi. 

Untersuchungen tlber das Klemmen der technisch 
wich'igsten Japanischen Holzarten. Von F. Koide^ 

Ringakushi, 



Vol. II, No. 6. 



Ertragstiafel und Znwachsgesetz far Sugi (Cryptomeria 
Japonica) Zum Gebranch far die Japanischen Porst-r 

m&nner. Vor. Seiroku Honda, Ringakushi et Dr. Oec, Pub.A 
a. o. Professor fur Forstwissenschaft an der Kaiserlichen Univer- j 
sitat zu Tokyo. : 

\ 



CONTENTS. 21 

Uber den Einfluss wechselnder Mengen von Kalk und 
Magnesia auf die Entwickelung der Nadelb&ume 

Von Dr. Oscar Loew, Professor der Agricultur-Chemie an der 
Kaiserlichen Universitat zu Tokyo und Dr. Seiroku Honda. 

Uber die Entstchung der VerkrUmmungen an Yotsu- 

yamaruta (Sugi-Stangenhclz). Von Dr. Seiroku Honda. 

Besitzen die Kiefemadeln ein mehrjahriges WachstumP 

Von Dr. Seiroku Honda. 









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